Year 10

WORK EXPERIENCE [NWS Year 10]

All students in Year 10 participate in a compulsory one-week Work Experience placement at the end of Term 2.

Aims

  • To assist students to learn in a practical way about a particular job and also about the place of work in society
  • To give students experience in coping with new situations and people – thus developing their self-confidence, initiative and independence
  • To give students an opportunity to explore their employment or career options
  • To provide opportunity for parents and children to discuss students’ future.
  • To allow students to observe the use made of skills taught in school subjects

School Work Experience programs are stringently controlled by various legal Requirements. These cover such areas as length of placements; payment of Work Experience students; age of students; prohibited tasks and jobs; injury to students, etc. No Work Experience arrangement can be made without the signed consent of parent, student, school and employer.  Students are also required to complete Occupational Health and Safety Training at the College prior to commencing placements.

To maximise the benefit of the program, students have been encouraged to choose areas that are consistent with both their aptitudes and interests. The DEEWR Job Guide For Victoria is particularly helpful in this respect – go online to www.jobguide.deewr.gov.au.

Students have been asked to take the responsibility for finding their own placements. This may be done through personal contacts of parents, letters seeking work experience, interviews, etc. Where difficulty is experienced in finding a placement, the College will seek to help.

Waverley Christian College students on Work Experience are expected to:

  • Perform the tasks and duties of the job in which they are placed to the best of their ability
  • Follow instructions and abide by all the rules and regulations that apply to full-time employees
  • Dress suitably and behave appropriately
  • Ask questions and make observations concerning their particular job and the place of work in society
  • Carry out the tasks set by the school, i.e., complete and return the Work Placement Report Book, take part in an evaluation of the program afterwards and ensure the school copy of the evaluation sheet is returned to the school

 

 

YEAR 10 [NWS Year 10]

The Year 10 students continue with the additional studies and activities, both curricular and extra-curricular, introduced the previous year. The curriculum is designed to draw together the skills and knowledge gained over the previous years.

Core subjects are used to prepare students for both the content and the system of the VCE. The emphasis in all core subjects is on learning to evaluate and utilise the contents of the previous years’ courses. Specialist subject selections provide a range of choices through which students gain a solid foundation for future VCE courses. Year 10 students have the opportunity to accelerate by studying a VCE subject in Year 10. 

Successful completion of Year 10 is a fine preparation for a life of service to the community and the Lord. For those students planning to study VCE, staff are available for consultation and counsel. The following procedures are suggested:

  • Consult with WCC Staff about possible career paths, requisite courses and subjects. (Information available from Careers Co-ordinator and Library).
  • Discuss subject options with VCE teachers.
  • Make use of Term 1 Parent/Teacher interviews (update on progress).

Staff are also willing to counsel students seeking apprenticeships or employment after Year 10, with a view to assisting each one to find the most fulfilling way of using their God-given abilities.

Waverley Christian College has a rich extra-curricular program, with many opportunities for enrichment and engagement. We encourage all students to get involved in activities of interest to them.

VCE Accelerated Study Program

As well as being able to complete a range of elective subjects at Year 10, we also offer students the opportunity to commence studies in a limited range of VCE studies. These studies include:

  • Business Management Units 1 and 2
  • Health and Human Development Units 1 and 2
  • Media Units 1 and 2
  • Psychology Units 1 and 2

Reasons for Commencing VCE in Year 10

In recent years many of our senior students have taken the option to accelerate in a particular VCE study and have met with success and experienced great benefit (personal and academic) for having done so. The reasons why we offer a VCE fast track program at Waverley Christian College include:

  • Catering for individual needs and interests
  • Maintaining motivation for learning (lack of boredom) extension and challenge
  • Opportunity for senior students to have a preliminary experience of the VCE processes
  • Have the option to pick up an extra VCE unit (10% bonus for ENTER for their fifth and/or sixth studies)
  • A greater sense of ownership and control of their own learning – effective independent learners
  • Subject Selection Rules

Please Note: Once the students have selected subjects, there will only be four electives and two VCE subjects.

 

 

BIBLICAL STUDIES Core Subject [NWS Year 10]

“A thorough knowledge of the Bible is worth more than a college education.” Theodore Roosevelt

Overview

In Year 10 Biblical Studies, students explore the Christian Biblical Worldview. Students are shown how to look at life issues through the lens of scripture. In the Book of Acts unit, the students explore the development and expansion of the early church. Students are given the opportunity to find their place in the local church by discovering their spiritual gifts. They also look at the powerful role of the Holy Spirit in the spread of the church

Aims

  • To continue to build the discipline of Bible reading in the life of the student
  • For students to gain an understanding of the Christian Biblical Worldview
  • Challenge students to be part of the local church and spread of the Gospel

Topics Include

  • SEMESTER 1: Christian Biblical Worldview
  • SEMESTER 2: Book of Acts

Time Allocation

  • 2 periods per cycle

Requirements

  • Any full translation of the Bible
  • Booklist Items

Assessment

  • Bible Reading Plans
  • Research Assignments
  • Oral Presentations
  • Tests

“But in your hearts set apart Christ as Lord. Always be prepared to give an answer to everyone who asks you to give the reason for the hope that you have” 1 Peter 3:15

 

 

CAREER EDUCATION [NWS Year 10]

“We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give” Winston Churchill

Overview

The overall goal of Career Education is to assist young people in their career development process. The program consists of the following components:

  • Self-awareness - activities that help students identify their personal attributes
  • Opportunity awareness - activities that involve students in investigating, exploring and experiencing the world of work and the various pathways within it
  • Decision learning – learning to make decisions regarding Career development
  • Transition planning – planning for the stages necessary in their career pathway

Aims

  • To develop a general understanding and appreciation of the world of work
  • To create an opportunity to identify, explore, expand and test career choices before the end of Year 10
  • To provide opportunities for students to gain confidence and better workplace communication skills
  • To introduce students to self-reflection regarding their skills, knowledge and attitudes towards future career choice
  • To develop students understanding of key competencies and employability skills
  • To help students develop job seeking skills
  • To assist students towards exploring pathways beyond Year 10
  • To reinforce the creational mandate from God to be involved in productive work

Topics Include

  • Career Pathways Planning
  • The Nature of Work
  • Work Experience
  • Job Seeking Skills
  • Introduction to VCE and Subject Selection
  • Building Your Workplace Skills
  • A Christian view of work

Time Allocation

  • 3 periods per cycle

Requirements

  • Students will need to organise their Work Experience placements with guidance from their class teacher and the Work Experience Coordinator

Assessment

  • Career Pathways Activities
  • Occupational Health and Safety Testing
  • Seminar Reflections
  • Resume and Letter of Application
  • Work Experience Journal

“Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as though you were working for the Lord and not for men” Colossians 3:23

 

 

ENGLISH Core Subject [NWS Year 10]

“We must contemplate the import of ignoring the printed word. If you cannot read, you can do only what you are told.” Joseph P. Bean

Overview

SEMESTER 1: Students analyse both written and film texts, utilising their knowledge of text construction including film elements and language devices. Exploring themes of ambition, revenge, freedom, reality and the effects of media, students consider multiple viewpoints on these issues and how they align with a Christian perspective. Students aim to sharpen and hone their vocabulary and expression to present their arguments with sophisticated precision in both written and verbal tasks.

SEMESTER 2: Students employ their analytical skills to compare two texts, considering their construction, themes, approach, style and language. Commenting on themes of mankind’s sinful nature and understanding the other, students consider the impact of these issues on the world from a Christian perspective. Building on their understanding of argument construction, they present a reasoned interpretation of a pair of texts as well as analyse the approach taken by persuasive authors in regard to their audience, purpose and context. Using these same persuasive techniques, students consider how to defend their own viewpoint in today’s world, presenting a persuasive oral on a current event.

Aims

  • To explore different perspectives on complex issues through reading and viewing a range of texts
  • To draw on a repertoire of strategies to maintain understanding through dense or extended texts
  • To experiment with knowledge of linguistic structures and features
  • To convey detailed information and explore different perspectives on complex, challenging issues through writing for specific and general audiences
  • To consider the contexts in which texts were or are created and how these are reflected in texts
  • To use the God-given gifts of creativity and discernment

Topics Include

  • Shakespeare’s world and texts
  • Shakespearean language
  • Creative writing
  • Issues orals
  • Analysing persuasive language and images in newspapers
  • Analysing themes and structure in texts
  • Exploring context and its relevance in selected texts
  • Comparing texts and their themes
  • Oral activities

Time Allocation

  • 9 periods per cycle

Requirements

  • Booklist Items

Assessment

  • Text questions and essays
  • Oral presentations
  • Creative writing
  • Class participation
  • Issue analysis
  • Examinations

“They read from the Book of the Law of God, making it clear and giving them meaning so that the people could understand what was being read” Nehemiah 8:8

 

 

HISTORY Core Subject [NWS Year 10]

“What are all histories but God manifesting himself, shaking down and trampling under foot whatsoever he hath not planted.” Oliver Cromwell

Overview

The focus of this course is Australia in the modern world from WWII to the present. It looks at Australia’s role in World War II as well as those events from an opposing perspective. It works through issues of national identity and the reasons behind global conflicts.  Finally, the course looks at Australia’s position in social movements that have swept the world in the 20th century particularly focusing on the Civil Rights movement in the United States of America and Australia.

Aims

  • To examine the impact of major world events on society
  • To develop an understanding of why individual groups and societies have interpreted history in different ways
  • To analyse effects of major values and beliefs on world affairs
  • To evaluate positive and negative aspects of change
  • To use knowledge about the past to explain contemporary events
  • To develop the intellectual skills of inquiry and critical thinking, and apply knowledge to develop and communicate understandings
  • To develop independent research skills in using a variety of sources, including learning technologies
  • To understand that God has a plan to accomplish His ultimate will and purpose for the nations, and is always in control.

Topics Include

  • The fight for rights and freedoms in 20th Century and today
  • Popular culture in Australia
  • Australia’s role in World War II, Nazism and the Holocaust
  • World War II in the Pacific and Europe
  • Civil Rights movement in the USA and Australia

Time Allocation

  • 4 periods per cycle, for a semester

Requirements

  • Booklist Items

Assessment

  • Research assignments or reports, including oral and multimedia presentations
  • Document Analysis
  • Tests / Exams
  • Class participation and group work

“Write on a scroll what you see and send it to the seven churches: to Ephesus, Smyrna, Pergamum, Thyatira, Sardis, Philadelphia and Laodicea.” “Write, therefore, what you have seen, what is now and what will take place later.” Revelation 1:11,19

 

 

MATHEMATICS Core Subject [NWS Year 10]

“God uses mathematics in everything He makes. He makes things in multiples of sevens, elevens, and forties. Everything that God does, He does according to mathematics: the writing of His Bible, the making of Arcturus and establishing the circuit of the earth. He imparts some of that wonderful knowledge to us that we may know something about His grace and love for us is this respect.” Asa Sparks

Overview

Mathematics incorporates skills practice, standard applications, extended problem solving, project work and testing. Students are expected to have access to and become proficient in the use of a CAS calculator. Students are generally expected to complete the coursework designated for their year level; and are encouraged to utilise their talents faithfully. However, it is recognised that there are different levels of mathematical ability. Hence, students may undertake modified work Requirements in some cases in order to consolidate fundamental mathematical skills whereas other students may work on an advanced program which develops a deeper understanding of set topics and extends students to provide access to more complex applications. This will enable greater access to advanced mathematics options in senior year levels.

Aims

  • To develop each student to their fullest mathematical potential according to their unique God-given talent
  • To appreciate the way in which mathematics reflects the order in God’s Creation
  • To appreciate the historical development of Mathematical concepts
  • To develop the students’ understanding of the concepts of number and space and their inter-relationship
  • To deepen the students’ awareness and understanding of mathematics as a functional tool in solving everyday problems

Topics Include

  • CAS calculator use
  • Indices
  • Algebra and equations
  • Coordinate geometry
  • Simultaneous linear equations and inequalities
  • Trigonometry
  • Surface area and volume
  • Quadratic expressions
  • Quadratic equations
  • Non-linear relationships
  • Deductive geometry
  • Probability
  • Univariate data
  • Bivariate data
  • Financial maths
  • Real numbers
  • Polynomials
  • Functions and relations
  • Circle geometry

Time Allocation

  • 8 periods per cycle, streamed according to previous achievement

Requirements

  • CAS Calculator
  • Booklist Items

Assessment

  • Assignments / Projects
  • Classwork
  • Topic Tests
  • Semester Examinations
  • Problem Solving Tasks

“He determines the number of the stars and calls them each by name” Psalm 147:4


 

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT Core Subject [NWS Year 10]

“All men have their frailties; and whoever looks for a friend without imperfections, will never find what he seeks. We love ourselves notwithstanding our faults, and we ought to love our friends in like manner.” Cyrus the Great, founder of the Persian empire

Overview

This subject is structured to capture the enthusiasm of Year 10 students. Topics covered vary from year to year, according to group needs and interests. Students are encouraged to consider their own relationship with the Lord, as well as general areas such as the Gospel, testimonies and missions work. Highlights of the course are the open forums where various topical questions are considered.

Aims

  • To enable students to develop spiritually and emotionally
  • To develop Christian character qualities
  • To encourage growth in relationships with the Lord Jesus Christ
  • To give Biblical guidelines for various areas of development
  • To enable students to grow in confidence through sharing ideas in a group setting
  • To understand Christian character is the product of the Holy Spirit’s work in us
  • To develop a healthy Christian worldview

Topics Include

  • Mental Health
  • Drugs
  • Rites of Passage

Time Allocation

  • 2 periods per cycle

Requirements

  • Bible
  • Booklist Items

Assessment

  • Students are expected to be actively involved in class discussions and activities

“Teacher, which is the great commandment in the Law?” Jesus replied, “‘Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind.’ This is the first and greatest commandment. And the second is like it: ‘Love your neighbour as yourself.’ Matthew 22:36-39


 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION Core Subject [NWS Year 10]

“The world would have us believe that winning or success is measured by points on a scoreboard or by dollar signs. The Christian realises that winning or success is determined by whether or not a goal has been achieved, and that goal is to bring glory to God.” Thomas M. Boqdon

Overview

Students participate in small-sided games, where they develop a Christian perspective towards cometition with a view to promoting sportsmanship and co-opeartion. The program Aims to develop co-ordination, skill and tactical play in more complex situations using a ‘game based’ approach. Promoting fitness for life is an integral part of the program and is addressed by exposing students to a range of different activities and sports from different cultures. Through the Sports Education unit on Basketball, student’s learn the importance of working collaboratively in various roles to create overall success in team sports

Aims

  • To improve skill levels under competitive pressure
  • To improve transfer of skills across games
  • To improve decision-making
  • To improve the use of space in games
  • To develop teamwork and cooperation
  • To develop leadership skills
  • To maximize participation
  • To increase fun, enjoyment and motivation

Topics Include

  • Australian Rules Football
  • Bat Tennis
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Fitness
  • International Sports
  • Touch Rugby

Time Allocation

  • 3 periods per cycle

Also

  • House Sports: Athletics, Ball Sports, Badminton, Cross Country, Swimming
  • Interschool Sports: football, Basketball, Handball, Soccer, Netball, Tennis, Super 8’s Cricket, Badminton, Table-Tennis, 5-a-side Soccer, Volleyball
  • WCC Activities: Aerobic Fitness, Gold, Indoor Cricket, Lawn Bowls, Self-defense, Tenpin Bowling

Requirements

  • Physical Education uniform as per College Handbook
  • A mouth-guard is recommended to be used for activities that involve a higher level of physical contact
  • Interschool sport where student is selected will result in additional invoice during the year
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Attitude and Application
  • Fitness
  • Skill Acquisition

“Do you not know that in a race all the runners run, but only one gets the prize? Run in such a way as to get the prize. Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever. Therefore, I do not run like someone running aimlessly; I do not fight like a boxer beating the air. No, I strike a blow to my body and make it my slave so that after I have preached to others, I myself will not be disqualified for the prize.” 1 Corinthians 9:24-27

 

 

SCIENCE Core Subject [NWS Year 10]

“The Christian faith of the early scientists gave them more than presuppositions; it also gave them motivation. They believed that in studying nature they were discovering the wisdom and power of the Creator and were thus honouring Him.” James F. Jekel

Overview

Students will extend their knowledge of the natural world and the Laws that govern Creation, from atoms to galaxies. They will extend their understanding of Chemistry by studying the Periodic Table and investigating a range of chemical reactions. They will gain an appreciation of Biology, encompassing the role that DNA and genetics play in storing information and the immensely complex instruction manual that has been majestically designed. Students will be empowered to describe all forms of movement and motion using Newton's Laws. Most importantly, students will be reminded of our responsibility to be good stewards of the creation that God has entrusted to us.

Aims

  • To give students experience in developing a production
  • To prepare students for VCE Drama or VCE Theatre Studies
  • To cultivate enthusiasm for performance in the students and the school community

Topics Include

  • Chemistry and the Periodic Table
  • Origins, Creation and Evolution
  • Biology and Genetics
  • Physics, Force, Movement and Mass
  • The Universe
  • Global Systems

Time Allocation

  • 8 periods

Requirements

  • Levy Cost
  • Booklist Items

Assessment

  • Topic Unit Tests
  • Assignments
  • Semester examinations
  • Practical investigations and reports

“But ask the animals, and they will teach you, or the birds in the sky, and they will tell you; or speak to the earth, and it will teach you, or let the fish in the sea inform you. Which of all these does not know that the hand of the Lord has done this? In his hand is the life of every creature and the breath of all mankind.” Job 12:7-10

 

 

 

ACTING PRODUCTION (Semester 2)Elective Subject [NWS Year 10]

“Thinking cannot be clear till it has had expression. We must write, or speak, or act our thoughts, or they will remain in a half torpid form. Our feelings must have expression, or they will be as clouds, which, till they descend as rain, will never bring up fruit or flower. So it is with the inward feelings; expression gives them development.” Henry Ward Beecher

Overview

Following on from the Semester 1 course, Acting Production (Semester 2) continues to build on practical drama skills and their application in creating and producing a drama show. Central to course curriculum are character development, creativity, innovation, team work, attendance, preparation and effort. As with Acting Production (Semester 1), the Semester 2 elective culminates in a live performance evening.

Aims

  • To give students experience in developing a production
  • To prepare students for VCE Drama or VCE Theatre Studies
  • To cultivate enthusiasm for performance in the students and the school community

Topics Include

  • Stanislavski Training
  • Choosing and casting the play
  • Rehearsal – Documented by journal entries and group participation
  • Performance – Preparation for maximising audience impact

Time Allocation

  • 4 periods per cycle

Prerequisites

  • Prior Drama experience in Years 8 or 9 is desirable but not essential

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • In-Class Performance Tests
  • Journal
  • Professionalism
  • Final Performance

“No-one ever spoke the way this man does.” John 7:4


 

CHINESE I Elective Subject [NWS Year 10]

A man who is ignorant of foreign languages is ignorant of his own. Johann Goethe

Overview

The Year 10 Chinese course have two streams---Chinese Culture (I & II) and Chinese Language(I & II). Students can choose either or both of the streams.

Chinese Language builds on topics covered in Years 8 and 9 and includes such topics as school life, leisure life, travelling, and sickness. Students continue to develop and refine their reading in Chinese characters and character writing skills through exposure to a range of documents in the Chinese script and structured study of grammar. Listening and speaking skills are developed through activities such as role-plays, pair work, interviews, and the use of multimedia and technologies such as CDs and DVDs, IPads, and laptops. A student’s progress is assessed in the outcome strands of listening and responding, and speaking; viewing, reading and responding; and writing. Students are taught in mixed ability groups and may choose to continue their studies into Years 11 and 12.

Chinese Culture is for students who have passion and would like to explore more of the Chinese culture and society. Students without previous Chinese learning experiences are welcome. Study of culture is an integral part of the curriculum. Students will form into a better understanding of Chinese culture through many hands-on activities, such as cooking and handcraft.

Aims

  • Students will have some understanding of what the Bible has to say about language. How God’s Word and our own experience that language and thought are inseparable, and that as a result what we say reflects our heart, our inmost being
  • Students learn about the rich and varied culture of China and Chinese speaking communities around the world. To give the students an understanding of one of our neighbouring nations, its culture, traditions and values
  • Students understand and use Chinese within the world of teenage experience and demonstrate comprehension of factual information from topics of interest

Topics Include

CHINESE LANGUAGE (I&II)

BEGINNER LEVEL STREAM

  • Asking school subjects, tests, class
  • Getting around, modes of transport
  • Leisure activities
  • Describing appearances
  • Travel, holidays
  • Feeling sick
  • Celebrations

ADVANCED LEVEL STREAM

  • My Family
  • My Dream
  • Travel
  • Learning Chinese
  • Chinese Cuisine
  • Food and Health

CHINESE CULTURE (I&II)

  • Chinese Traditional Festivals
  • Food and Drink
  • Arts and Leisure
  • Lifestyles of the Chinese

Time Allocation

  • 4 periods per cycle

Prerequisites

Chinese Language (I&II)

  • Recommended prior study: Year 9 LOTE Chinese
  • For students who have not taken Chinese in Year 9: Teaching and learning will support and cater for mixed abilities

Chinese Culture (I&II)

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

CHINESE LANGUAGE (I&II)

  • Oral and written communication activities
  • Classroom work and activities, workbook/games/role-plays
  • Ability to respond to Chinese instructions

CHINESE CULTURE (I&II)

  • Classroom participation
  • Critical thinking

“The Lord said, “If as one people speaking the same language they have begun to do this, then nothing they plan to do will be impossible for them. Come, let us go down and confuse their language so they will not understand each other.” That is why it was called Babel – because there the Lord confused the language of the whole world. From there the Lord scattered them over the face of the whole earth.” Genesis 11:6-7, 9

 

 

DYNAMIC DESIGN Elective Subject [NWS Year 10]

“The world is God’s epistle to mankind – His thoughts are flashing upon us from every direction” Plato, 427-347 BC

Overview

The Design Studio study examines the way visual language can be used to convey ideas, information and messages in the fields of communication, environmental and industrial design. Students develop the skills to communicated ideas through manipulation and organisation of design elements, design principles, selected media, materials and methods of production. During their study students have the opportunity to investigate the work and practices of contemporaty designers. Through their research they build an understanding of the important role of visual communication design within society. Students will learn skills of digital are, model-making and 3D drawing.

Aims

  • To develop visual thinking and expression through drawing
  • To develop an awareness of appropriate visual representation for different audiences
  • To incorporate effective use of design elements and principles in environmental design tasks
  • ICT skills – Computer Aided Design (CAD) using Sketch up, Adobe Illustrator & Autodesk Fusion 360
  • To develop an awareness of appropriate visual representation in design and marketing
  • To develop skills using hand and digital graphic software with increasing competence
  • To be able to select, combine and manipulate elements and principles of design relevant to a brief
  • To create digital works which explore and communicate themes, issues and ideas

Topics Include

  • Communication Design
  • Designing to a brief
  • Environment Design
  • Industrial design
  • Analysis

Time Allocation

  • 4 periods per cycle, year long

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • All class work – ideas, development and final presentations of digital artwork
  • Digital folio

“Let the favor of the Lord our God be upon us; establish the work of our hands for us - Yes, establish the work of our hands.” Psalm 90:17


 

DESIGN TECHNOLOGY: Engineering Elective Subject [NWS Year 10]

“I never understood how the Son of God who created electricity chose to come to earth at a time when He had to go to bed by candle-light, or how He who understood all the principles of aerodynamics and spacecraft was willing to travel from place to place riding on a donkey.” Major Ian Thomas

Overview

Students in Engineering Design are immersed in the creative process of solving problems by identifying needs and then developing solutions. Depending on the problem, the solution may be a product, a technique, and structure, a process or a combination of multiple elements. This course is intended to stimulate students’ ingenuity, creative and critical thinking and practical skills in devising solutions to engineering design problems. Students use the engineering design process to investigate, design, plan, test, produce and evaluate solutions. Students will be challenged with problems they have not seen before, giving them practice experimenting, working through uncertain, breaking problems down into smaller parts, taking risks and playing with their own ideas. The Engineering elective is a practical course, which provides opportunities for students to develop knowledge, understanding and skills in relation to general engineering concepts. Students will explore board topics in Systems, Electrical, Mechanical and Software engineering.

Aims

  • Provide students with opportunities to apply maths, geometry and reasoning skills in practical, relevant and contextualised ways
  • Students will explore computational skills through coding, programming, electronics and robotics
  • Develop Technological, problem-solving and hands-on practical skills
  • To solve an engineering problem, the students would need to design parts, build them, write code and then evaluate their success. This problem solving process will allow them to be inventors of both hardware and software in creative and exciting ways
  • Explore many career fields; including engineering, science, mathematics, computer aided design (CAD) and electronics
  • CAD drawing and designing: Using Autodesk Fusion 360

Topics Include

  • Problem Solving Simulations – Real world scenarios
  • Computational Thinking - Algorithms, Encription and Ciphers
  • Computer Science - Python programming
  • Engineering Design Process
  • Inquiry Project - Mouse Trap Vehicle using CAD and Laser Cutting

Time Allocations

  • 4 periods per cycle for a whole year

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy cost

Assessment

  • Use of technology and equipment
  • Engineering design process - logbook
  • Creative and critical thinking
  • Classroom participation

“Looks also at ships: although they are so large and are driven by fierce winds, they are turned by a very small rudder wherever the pilot desires. Even so the tongue is a little member, and boasts great things.” James 3:4-5

 

 

DESIGN TECHNOLOGY: Engineering - VEX Robotics Elective Subject [NWS Year 10]

“I never understood how the Son of God who created electricity chose to come to earth at a time when He had to go to bed by candle-light, or how He who understood all the principles of aerodynamics and spacecraft was willing to travel from place to place riding on a donkey.” Major Ian Thomas

Overview

Students in this course will be introduced to the field of robotics and explore how they are used in our world. The VEX Robotics Design System, combined with Robot C software, teach students how different aspects of engineering are used in the field of robotics. Students learn how to build, wire and program their robot as they explore how the hardware is entirely controlled by commands they create in software. Students will engage in solving abstract problems in computer programming activities as well as practical hands on engineering tasks. Together, these will provide opportunities for them to develop, practice and demonstrate creative and critical thinking skills in all aspects of their work.

Aims

  • Provide students with opportunities to apply maths, geometry and reasoning skills in practical, relevant and contextualised ways
  • Students will explore computational skills through coding, C+ programming, electronics and robotics
  • Develop technological, problem-solving and hands-on practical skills
  • To solve an engineering problem, the students would need to design parts, build them, write code and then evaluate their success. This problem solving process will allow them to be inventors of both hardware and software in creative and exciting ways
  • Explore many career fields; including engineering, science, mathematics, computer aided design (CAD), electronics
  • CAD drawing and designing: Using Autodesk Fusion 360

Topics Include

  • C+ programming and coding
  • VEX robotics – designing and creating a robot
  • Robot wars – Challenge
  • Engineering Challenge
  • Inquiry Project - Mechanical Advantage

Time Allocations

  • 4 periods per cycle for a whole year

Pre requisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy cost

Assessment

  • C+ Programming & Coding
  • Robot Design
  • Design Process
  • Robot Challenge
  • Team Collaboration

“Looks also at ships: although they are so large and are driven by fierce winds, they are turned by a very small rudder wherever the pilot desires. Even so the tongue is a little member, and boasts great things.” James 3:4-5

 

 

FRENCH LANGUAGE I Elective Subject [NWS Year 10]

A man who is ignorant of foreign languages is ignorant of his own. Johann Goethe

Overview

This unit gives students an opportunity to further develop their ability to communicate in French, by developing their oral and written skills. The techniques employed for language learning will continue to be used and modified according to the context and topic. This unit will highlight the differences between French and Australian ways of life. As a result, students will have a much broader understanding of customs and culture in general. The unit also encourages students to comprehend the French language framework and structure at a deeper level and will provide a greater satisfaction in being able to communicate more effectively.

Students intending to continue French in Year 11 must undertake two units of French in Year 10.

Aims

  • Students will have some understanding of what the Bible has to say about language. How God's Word and our own experience that language and thought are inseparable, and that as a result what we say reflects our heart, our inmost being
  • Students learn about the rich and varied culture of France and Francophone communities around the world. To give the students an understanding of one of our neighbouring nations, its culture, traditions and values
  • Students understand and use French within the world of teenage experience and demonstrate comprehension of factual information from topics of interest

Topics Include

  • Meilleurs copains – Paris landmarks and culture: describe yourself and other people, talk about your own personality traits as well as those of your best friends, discuss what activities you want to do, talk about how you get on with others, describe your ideal family and friends.
  • Quelle histoire! Talking about the past: describe what things were like, say what you used to do, share good memories and bad experiences with others.
  • Vivre écolo -  The environment: discuss environmental issues and solutions, such as sustainable living, talk about future events, talk about chores and routines, discuss volunteering experiences, analyse and choose menu options
  • Projets d’avenir – School and beyond: discuss education and career choices, say what you would, could or should do, talk about your study experience, give advice and consider options, prepare your CV and interview for a job, discuss historical connections.

Time Allocation

  • 4 periods per cycle

Prerequisites

  • Recommended prior study: Year 9 French
  • For students who have not taken French in Year 9: Teaching and learning will support and cater for mixed abilities.

Requirements

  • Booklist Items
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Writing, listening, speaking, reading comprehension and cultural knowledge and understanding tasks
  • Classroom tasks, projects and activities (workbook/role-plays)
  • Weekly Spelling / Vocabulary tests
  • Topic Tests

“The Lord said, “If as one people speaking the same language they have begun to do this, then nothing they plan to do will be impossible for them. Come, let us go down and confuse their language so they will not understand each other.” That is why it was called Babel – because there the Lord confused the language of the whole world. From there the Lord scattered them over the face of the whole earth.” Genesis 11:6-7, 9


 

FRENCH LANGUAGE II Elective Subject [NWS Year 10]

A man who is ignorant of foreign languages is ignorant of his own. Johann Goethe

Overview

This unit gives students an opportunity to further develop their ability to communicate in French, by developing their oral and written skills. The techniques employed for language learning will continue to be used and modified according to the context and topic. This unit will highlight the differences between French and Australian ways of life. As a result, students will have a much broader understanding of customs and culture in general. The unit also encourages students to comprehend the French language framework and structure at a deeper level and will provide a greater satisfaction in being able to communicate more effectively.

Students intending to continue French in Year 11 must undertake two units of French in Year 10.

Aims

  • Students will have some understanding of what the Bible has to say about language. How God's Word and our own experience that language and thought are inseparable, and that as a result what we say reflects our heart, our inmost being
  • Students learn about the rich and varied culture of France and Francophone communities around the world. To give the students an understanding of one of our neighbouring nations, its culture, traditions and values
  • Students understand and use French within the world of teenage experience and demonstrate comprehension of factual information from topics of interest

Topics Include

  • Vivre écolo -  The environment: discuss environmental issues and solutions, such as sustainable living, talk about future events, talk about chores and routines, discuss volunteering experiences, analyse and choose menu options
  • Projets d’avenir – School and beyond: discuss education and career choices, say what you would, could or should do, talk about your study experience, give advice and consider options, prepare your CV and interview for a job, discuss historical connections.

Time Allocation

  • 4 periods per cycle

Prerequisites

  • Recommended prior study: Year 9 French
  • For students who have not taken French in Year 9: Teaching and learning will support and cater for mixed abilities.

Requirements

  • Booklist Items
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Writing, listening, speaking, reading comprehension and cultural knowledge and understanding tasks
  • Classroom tasks, projects and activities (workbook/role-plays)
  • Weekly Spelling / Vocabulary tests
  • Topic Tests

“The Lord said, “If as one people speaking the same language they have begun to do this, then nothing they plan to do will be impossible for them. Come, let us go down and confuse their language so they will not understand each other.” That is why it was called Babel – because there the Lord confused the language of the whole world. From there the Lord scattered them over the face of the whole earth.” Genesis 11:6-7, 9


 

FRENCH THROUGH FILM Elective Subject [NWS Year 10]

A man who is ignorant of foreign languages is ignorant of his own. Johann Goethe

Overview

Many French learners already know that watching movies is one of the best and most enjoyable ways to learn through immersion. Through the study of French film, students will enhance their language skills and further appreciate French culture. Films are authentic materials that expose students to the real language used by native speakers in daily life. They are also a great source of social, cultural and civilizational information.

Students intending to continue French in Year 11 must undertake two units of French in Year 10.

Aims

  • Studetns will improve listening skills through films viewed and topics discussed
  • Students will improve conversation skills through films viewed and topics discussed
  • Students become familiar with diverse accents and speaking patterns of various regions of France and French-speaking countries
  • Students learn common gestures and facial expressions used in communication
  • Students develop more confidence in speaking skills through conversations generated by films viewed and topics discussed
  • Students practice written expression via worksheets and projects
  • Students will broaden vocabulary while learning new idiomatic and/or slang expressions and understanding the context in which they may be used
  • Students review major grammar points as observed being used in context and put them into practice
  • Students acquire a greater understanding of the history of film in general and the history of French film in particular
  • Students acquire a greater understanding of the French historical, social and cultural context which constitute the background of the films studied

Topics Include

Films will be carefully selected based on a number of factors:

  • Appropriate language level
  • Appropriate content for the age range of the students
  • Simulating content

Here are some examples of films which maybe covered during the unit of study:

  • Le petit prince
  • Ratatouille
  • The 100 Foot Jouney and 
  • Le Petit Nicolas

Time Allocation

  • 4 periods per cycle

Prerequisites

  • Recommended prior study: Year 9 French
  • For students who have not taken French in Year 9: Teaching and learning will support and cater for mixed abilities.

Requirements

  • Booklist Items
  • Levy Cost

 

Assessment

  • Writing, listening, speaking, reading comprehension and cultural knowledge and understanding tasks
  • Classroom tasks, projects and activities (workbook/film review)
  • Vocabulary tests
  • Topic Test

“The Lord said, “If as one people speaking the same language they have begun to do this, then nothing they plan to do will be impossible for them. Come, let us go down and confuse their language so they will not understand each other.” That is why it was called Babel – because there the Lord confused the language of the whole world. From there the Lord scattered them over the face of the whole earth.” Genesis 11:6-7, 9


 

FRESHWATER ECOLOGY Elective Subject [NWS Year 10]

“The Christian faith of the early scientists gave them more than presuppositions; it also gave them motivation. They believed that in studying nature they were discovering the wisdom and power of the Creator and were thus honouring Him.” James F. Jekel

Overview

Students investigate the structure and complexities of freshwater ecosystems. They seek to understand the responsible management of fisheries, preserving organisms at each trophic level to ensure that our local ecosystems are sustainable. Throught the unit, students run their own acqaculture unit, measure water chemistry and develop an understanding of how it affects species’ survival. By understanding the complexities of ecological requirements for life, students witness the magnitude of the Creator’s design and comprehend the importance of our mandate to be caretakers of Creation.

Aims

  • Give an understanding of how scientists use data to sustainable assist management of natural resources
  • Demonstrate the effect that aquaculture can have on developing countries
  • Encourage God’s awesome creation of the underwater world
  • Logbook keeping skills

Topics Include

  • Tanks and water quality
  • Conservation and sustainability
  • Ecosystems
  • Flow of energy within freshwater ecosystems
  • Effects of polution on freshwater ecosystems

Time Allocation

  • 4 periods per cycle for Semester 2

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy cost

Assessment

  • Practical work and scientific journal
  • Poster presentation
  • Ecosystem diarama

“But ask the animals, and they will teach you, or the birds in the sky, and they will tell you; or speak to the earth, and it will teach you, or let the fish in the sea inform you. Which of all these does not know that the hand of the Lord has done this? In his hand is the life of every creature and the breath of all mankind.” Job 12:7-10


 

GEOGRAPHY Elective Subject [NWS Year 10]

God left His fingerprints all over creation. Byron Snapp

Overview

There are two units of study in the Year 10 curriculum for Geography: Environmental Change and Management and Geographies of Human Wellbeing. Environmental Change and Management focuses on an overview of the environmental functions that support all like, the major challenges to their sustainability and how people perceive and respond to these challenges. Students investigate a specific type of environment and environmental change in Australia and one other country. Geographies of human wellbeing focuses on investigating global, national and local differences in human wellbeing between places. This unit examines the different concepts and measures of human wellbeing, and the causes of global differences in these measures between countries. Students explore programs designed to reduce the gap between differences in wellbeing. 

Aims

  • To help students to understand their role in the management of the human and natural environment and resources, especially as God’s stewards on the Earth
  • To understand the causes and consequences of change in places and environments and how can this change be managed
  • To help students understand the complexity of biophysical, managed and constructed environments
  • To evaluate the state of our planet today and in the future and the impact of human activities on the environment
  • To consider how worldviews influence decisions on how to manage environmental and social change and how humanity should respond to change / inequality

Topics Include

  • Environmental Change and Management in
  • Human environments (e.g. cities)
  • Natural environments (e.g. marine or inland waters) 
  • Global Wellbeing and improving living conditions 

Time Allocation

  • 4 periods per cycle, for one semester

Requirements

  • Booklist item

Assessment

  • Environment Change Case Study
  • Fieldwork Report
  • Data Analysis
  • Global Wellbeing Case Study
  • Examination

“The earth is the Lord’s, and everything in it, the world, and all who live in it”. Psalm 24:1

 

 

LET’S PARTY Elective Subject [NWS Year 10]

“Look to your health; and if you have it, praise God and value it next to a good conscience; for health is the second blessing that  we mortals are capable of – a blessing that money cannot buy; therefore value it, and be thankful for it.” Isaak Walton

Overview

Students have the opportunity to demonstrate love for others through the sharing of food and fellowship around shared food and experiences. Students develop skills in the preparation and service of a wide range of foods suitable for a variety of functions, as they follow the directive in Scripture to offer hospitality. The subject is highly practical with theory components relating to food service and hospitality. During practical work, the emphasis is on developing a very high standard of organisational skills, food handling and presentation.

Aims

  • To develop a deeper understanding of all types of practical cookery
  • To understand food components and their use in cookery
  • To begin practising hospitality through menu planning and preparation
  • To understand God’s concern for our need for food
  • To understand the functional properties of food
  • To understand planning requirements for functions and special events

Topics Include

  • Kitchen skills
  • Hygiene
  • Function planning
  • Menus and meal preparation
  • Food presentation
  • Organisation and time management

Time Allocation

  • 4 periods a cycle

Requirements

  • Booklist items
  • Suitable container to transport food
  • Levy costAssessment
  • Practical work and written evaluations
  • Assignment
  • Tests

“Everything that lives and moves will be food for you. Just as I gave you the green plants, I now give you everything”  Genesis 9:3


 

LITERATURE Elective Subject [NWS Year 10]

“We must contemplate the import of ignoring the printed word. If you cannot read, you can do only what you are told.” Joseph P. Bean

Overview

Year 10 Literature encourages students to foster a love of reading and writing, developing an appreciation for the aesthetic merit and beauty of texts.  Students consider how texts are a reflection of the world in which they are written and how deeply embedded they are in social, historical and cultural contexts. Through close analysis of texts, students consider how literary elements and techniques construct meaning. Students engage in close reading of texts, using critical thinking to respond to texts analytically and creatively. They consider different ways of reading texts as informed by the views and values of the reader. Year 10 Literature provides students with opportunities to examine the complexity of human experience as represented in a wide range of texts.

Aims

  • To develop an enjoyment and appreciation of literature
  • To develop creative, innovative and critical thinking through analysis and creation of a range of texts
  • To demonstrate an understanding of how the views and values of the reader and author shape interpretation of text
  • To examine how literary elements and techniques shape interpretation of texts

Topics Include

  • Ancient Literature (including the parables and poetry of the Bible)
  • Victorian Literature

Time Allocation

  • 4 periods a cycle
  • This unit is offered in both Semester 1 and 2

Requirements

  • Booklist items
  • Levy cost

Assessments

  • Writing folio
  • Oral presentation
  • Creative and analytical essays 

“They read from the Book of the Law of God, making it clear and giving them meaning so that the people could understand what was being read” Nehemiah 8:8


 

 

MARINE ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY Elective Subject [NWS Year 10]

“The Christian faith of the early scientists gave them more than presuppositions; it also gave them motivation. They believed that in studying nature they were discovering the wisdom and power of the Creator and were thus honouring Him.” James F. Jekel

Overview

Students undertake investigation tasks studying marine animals as well as the diverse biotic and abiotic factors thay they encounter in their environments. Throughout their studies, students keep a logbook of experimental notes and practise key laboratory skills associated with applied studies of Biology. Identification of structural, physiological and behavioral adaptations of marine organisms to observe and appreciate intelligent design in the created world around us as well as management strategies to assist students in being good stewards God’s Creation.

  • Aims
  • Investigate the current animal classification system
  • Give an understanding of how scientists use data to assist management of natural resources
  • Encourage God’s awesome creation of the underwater world
  • Investigate adaptations in marine organisms
  • Logbook keeping skills 

Topics Include

  • Characteristics of the animal classifications
  • Conservation and sustainability
  • Marine organism adaptations

Time Allocation

  • 4 periods per cycle for Semester 1

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy cost

Assessment

  • Practical work and scientific journal
  • Poster presentation

“But ask the animals, and they will teach you, or the birds in the sky, and they will tell you; or speak to the earth, and it will teach you, or let the fish in the sea inform you. Which of all these does not know that the hand of the Lord has done this? In his hand is the life of every creature and the breath of all mankind.” Job 12:7-10


 

MEDIA ARTS: Photography Elective Subject [NWS Year 10]

“God’s creative activity went far beyond the minimum Requirements for getting the job done. Butterflies in the rain forest seldom seen by human eyes are creatures of breathtaking beauty. The delicate transparency of the man-of-war and the hummingbird’s wing are inimitable …” Le Roy Koopman

Overview

In this unit, students will develop the ability to produce high quality photographs using digital technology. They will understand the scope and nature of digital photography, along with its many career possibilities. Students will learn about selecting camera equipment, lenses and other accessories to further enhance their images, including the selection of suitable post processing techniques using Adobe Lightroom software. They will explore different elements of composition in order to create more interesting photographs and further develop their understanding of camera settings whilst working in manual mode. Students will work through the production process for each of their major productions, including creating design boards and meeting client briefs. Students will gain exposure to the experience of working as a marketing manager and producing social media content to represent a brand in a professional capacity, whilst developing an appreciation for and understanding of responsible media practices in this industry.

Aims

  • To learn about various photographic equipment and studio set up methods
  • To explore different elements of composition to improve general photo quality, including shooting on manual mode to adjust shutter speed, aperture and ISO settings
  • To understand what it means to work to a design brief and produce a folio of photographs for a client, just as a professional would do
  • To improve general photographic editing skills in Adobe Lightroom and final presentation of a piece, including some interaction with Adobe Illustrator

Topics Include

  • Modernised Landscape Photography
  • Monochrome and Macro Photography
  • Creative Composition
  • Marketing, Advertising and Responsible Social Media Practices
  • Flatlay Photographic Masterclass with Industry Professional
  • Portrait Studio and Lighting Set Up
  • Stop Motion Animated Marketing for Business Social Media Profiles

Time Allocation

  • 4 periods per cycle
  • This unit can be taken in addition to the correspoinding unit Media Arts: Film offered in the subsequent semester.

Prerequisites

  • Ideally, the student will have studied Year 8 or 9 Media Arts for a basic understanding of aperture, shutter speed and composition, however this is not absolutely essential. Some experience with using a digital camera will be beneficial.

Requirements

  • Minimum 8GB SD Card
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Practical projects including shooting and editing techniques
  • Photographic and media productions
  • Projects will mostly be completed during class time, however, occasionally work will need to be completed outside of school hours

"Listen to this, Job; stop and consider God's wonders.” Job 37:14


 

MEDIA ARTS: Film Elective Subject [NWS Year 10]

“God’s creative activity went far beyond the minimum Requirements for getting the job done. Butterflies in the rain forest seldom seen by human eyes are creatures of breathtaking beauty. The delicate transparency of the man-of-war and the hummingbird’s wing are inimitable …” Le Roy Koopman

Overview

In this unit, students will develop the ability to extend their videography and filmmaking skills by creating short films and animations using digital technology. They will understand the scope and nature of filmmaking and its various career opportunities with the opportunity to connect with professionals in this field. Students will learn about selecting camera equipment, recording sound, suitable lense choice and other skills required to further produce final media products. Post processing software will include iMovie, Adobe Premiere Pro and students with more advanced skills will have the opportunity to experiment with Adobe After Affects. Students will explore different elements of composition and solidify their understanding of shot types and camera morement in order to create more interesting films. Students will work through the production process for each of their major productions, including creating design boards and fulfilling the pre and post production processes required for senior VCE Media Studies. They will also learn and analyse responsible media practices in this industry.

Aims

  • To learn about various videography equipment and recording tehniques
  • To explore different elements of composition including shot types and camera movements to improve general video quality, including the use of manual aperture
  • To improve general editing skills in Adobe Premiere Pro and an introduction to the capabilities of Adobe After Affects.

Topics Include

  • Continuity Editing
  • Careers in Filmmaking
  • Creative Composition
  • Marketing, Advertising and Responsible Social Media Practices
  • Pre and Post Production Processes to prepare for VCE Media

Time Allocation

  • 4 periods per cycle
  • This unit can be taken in addition to the correspoinding unit Media Arts: Photography offered in the subsequent semester.

Prerequisites

  • Ideally, the student will have studied Year 8 or 9 Media Arts for a basic understanding of filmmaking and videography, however this is not absolutely essential. Some experience with using a digital camera will be beneficial.

Requirements

  • Minimum 8GB SD Card
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Practical projects including shooting and editing techniques
  • Video and Media Final Productions including Film Analysis Tasks
  • Projects will mostly be completed during class time, however, occasionally work will need to be completed outside of school hours

"Listen to this, Job; stop and consider God's wonders.” Job 37:14

 

 

MUSIC PERFORMANCE 10.0 Elective Subject [NWS Year 10]

“The aim and final reason of all music should be nothing else but the glory of God and the refreshment of the spirit.” Johann Sebastian Bach

Overview

In this Semester 1 subject, students refine their skills on their chosen instrument and work on both solo and group performance tasks. Students gain greater performance experience in both the classroom and at College events. Musicianship is further explored and used as a basis for music making, creating and arranging. Students musically produce their own digital recording track, combining live instruments with electronic sounds. Enrolment in both semester courses is advised as a precursor to VCE Music studies.

Aims

  • To play music that students enjoy
  • To develop students’ musical performance skills on their chosen instrument
  • To gain a broader knowledge of popular music genres
  • To combine the elements of music in creating and making music
  • To be able to digitally produce music using audio recording software and hardware
  • To improve music theory and aural skills
  • To prepare for VCE Music studies

Topics Include:

  • Music Performance
  • Music Theory
  • Popular Music Genres
  • Digital Music Producing

Time Allocation:

  • 4 periods per cycle for one semester

Requirements:

  • Booklist items
  • Estimated Levy $50.00

Assessments

  • Solo and Group performances
  • Music Theory and Aural testing
  • Music Genres project
  • Music Technology recording project

“Praise the Lord, Praise God in his sanctuary; praise him in his mighty heavens. Praise him for his acts of power; praise him for his surpassing greatness. Praise him with the sounding of the trumpet, praise him with the harp and lyre, praise him with tambourine and dancing, praise him with the strings and flute, praise him with the clash of cymbals, praise him with resounding cymbals. Let everything that has breath praise the Lord. Praise the Lord” Psalm 150


MUSIC PERFORMANCE 10.1 Elective Subject [NWS Year 10]

“The aim and final reason of all music should be nothing else but the glory of God and the refreshment of the spirit.” Johann Sebastian Bach

Overview

This second semester of Music is specially designed to buildon the foundations laid in Semester 1 and is especially suited for students wanting to prepare for VCE Music. Students  who love playing and performng music will especially enjoy this course,which focuses on playing different genres of music and performance skills. Both group and solo playing is integral to the course, with performance goals and technical skills further mastered.. Students who select this unit must be able to sing confidently or play an instrument Elements of song-writing and arranging are also further explored.

Aims

  • To develop student’s musical ability on their instrument
  • To foster appreciation of music
  • To develop ability to identify and use musical elements
  • To gain greater music theory knowledge
  • To be able to play and perform different styles of music
  • To develop student’s understanding and ability in songwriting and arranging

Topics Include

  • Music Theory/ Aural Studies
  • Group Performance
  • Individual Peformance Project
  • Song writing and Arranging

Time Allocation

  • 4 periods per cycle, Semester 1

Requirements

  • Booklist items
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Analysis Project
  • In class Solo and Group Instrument Performance
  • Theory worksheets and Tests
  • Song Writing and Arranging

“Praise the Lord, Praise God in his sanctuary; praise him in his mighty heavens. Praise him for his acts of power; praise him for his surpassing greatness. Praise him with the sounding of the trumpet, praise him with the harp and lyre, praise him with tambourine and dancing, praise him with the strings and flute, praise him with the clash of cymbals, praise him with resounding cymbals. Let everything that has breath praise the Lord. Praise the Lord” Psalm 150


 

OUTDOOR EDUCATION: Silver Elective Subject [NWS Year 10]

“The world is God’s epistle to mankind – His thoughts are flashing upon us from every direction.” Plato, 427-347 B.C.

Overview

Outdoor and Environmental Studies examines some of the ways in which humans understand and relate to nature through experiences of outdoor environments. The focus is on individuals and their personal responses to and experiences of outdoor environments. In addition to this, students will begin to investigate the different types of Outdoor Environments and the impacts we as humans have on them. Students will also be given the opportunity to complete an appropriate level of the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award which is an internationally recognized program that provides the motivation to undertake a variety of voluntary and challenging activities. The award program has 3 levels; Bronze, Silver and Gold. Each of these three levels is comprised of four sections covering Service, Skill, Adventurous Journey and Physical Recreation. In Outdoor Education Silver, students will complete their Silver award and develop leadership skills that they can take in all aspects of life.

Aims

  • Develop leadership skills for all aspects of life
  • Students should be able to describe motivations for participation in and personal responses to outdoor environments, with reference to specific outdoor experiences
  • Students should be able to describe ways of knowing and experiencing outdoor environments and evaluate factors that influence outdoor experiences, with reference to specific outdoor experiences
  • Understand different types of Outdoor Environments and the impacts we can have on them

SERVICE - Minimum of  6 months

SKILL - Minimum of  6 months

ADVENTUROUS JOURNEY - 2 expeditions. Length: minimum of 3 days and 2 nights

PHYSICAL RECREATION - Minimum of 6 months

One of service, skill or physical recreation must be extended for a minimum total of 12 months if Bronze not completed

Time Allocation

  • 4 periods a cycle

Prerequisites

  • It is recommended that students have completed either Year 8 Outdoor Education or Year 9 Duke of Edinburgh before taking on this subject as they provide an introduction to basic camp-craft skills, hiking food, map reading, first aid, and care of the environment, route planning and proper use of hiking equipment.

Requirements

  • Booklist items
  • Levy cost

Assessments

  • Campcraft Skills practical demo
  • Camp Report
  • Award Progress
  • Leadership Course
  • Investigating Outdoor Environments Presentation
  • Impacts on Outhdoor Enviornments Test

“The heavens declare the glory of God; and the firmament shows His handiwork.” Psalm 19:1


 

SPORTS SCIENCE I Elective Subject [NWS Year 10]

“The world would have us believe that winning or success is measured by points on a scoreboard or by dollar signs. The Christian realises that winning or success is determined by whether or not a goal has been achieved, and that goal is to bring glory to God.” Thomas M. Boqdon

Overview

Students explore the characteristics of the three major energy systems and their role in energy production. They will investigate the relative contribution and interplay of each energy system during performance in physical activity. Student discuss the uniqueness of the human body and its ability to perform under stress as an excellent celebration of our creator God.  Students explore the causes of fatigue and consider different strategies used to postpone fatigue and promote recovery. Students will participate in various practical classes where they will be required to analyse and apply their understanding of the energy systems, fatiguing factors and recovery strategies.

Aims 

  • To explore the characteristics of the three energy systems
  • To discuss the interplay of energy systems
  • To identify key factors responsible for causing fatigue
  • To apply appropriate physiological or dietary recovery strategies

Topics Include

  • Energy systems
  • ATP-PC Energy System
  • Anaerobic Glycolysis Energy System
  • Aerobic Energy System
  • Energy System Interplay
  • Fatigue
  • Metabolic by-products
  • Elevated body temperature
  • Fuel depletion
  • Recovery strategies
  • Dietary
  • Physiological

Time Allocation

  • 4 periods per cycle

Requirements

  • Levy Costs – Recovery Strategies Excursion to Axis and METS VO2 Max Lab Incursion

Assessment

  • Energy Systems Test – 30%
  • Progressive Workbook Assignment – 40%
  • Reflective Folio of Participation in Practical Activities – 30%

“Do you not know that in a race all the runners run, but only one gets the prize? Run in such a way as to get the prize. Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever. Therefore I do not run like someone running aimlessly; I do not fight like a boxer beating the air. No, I strike a blow to my body and make it my slave so that after I have preached to others, I myself will not be disqualified for the prize.” 1 Corinthians 9:24-27


 

SPORTS SCIENCE II Elective Subject [NWS Year 10]

“The world would have us believe that winning or success is measured by points on a scoreboard or by dollar signs. The Christian realises that winning or success is determined by whether or not a goal has been achieved, and that goal is to bring glory to God.” Thomas M. Boqdon

Overview

Students explore a variety of methods to analyse skill frequencies, movement patterns, heart rates and work to rest ratios to determine the requirements of an activity. This information can be utilised to direct training and lead to improved performance. Students use a variety of tools and techniques to analyse movement skills and apply biomechanical principles to improve and refine movement patterns in physical activity, sport and exercise. They use practical activities to demonstrate how correct application of these principles can lead to improved performance in physical activity and sport.

Aims

  • To understand the various methods of data collection to aid activity analysis
  • To utilise data collection to direct training and improve performance
  • To understand biomechanical principles and their application in real life sporting activities
  • To undertake a biomechanical analysis to improve performance
  • To explore the role of biomechanics in improving safety and performance in sport

Topics Include

  • Activity analysis
  • Skill frequencies
  • Movement patterns 
  • Heart Rate analysi
  • Work-to-rest ratio
  • Observation techniques
  • Technology assisted (apps and monitors)
  • Link between training and performance
  • Biomechanics
  • Newton’s laws, Impulse, Projectile motion (Magnus), Momentum, Levers, Friction, Force & Stability

Time Allocation

  • 4 periods per cycle

Requirements

  • Levy costs – Sports Science Experience BioLab Incursion and Activity Analysis at the State Basketball Center ($40)

Assessment

  • Reflective folio of involvement in activity analysis practical sessions – 35% 
  • Biomechanics Test – 25% 
  • Research assignment on Biomechanical advancements in sport – 40% 

“Do you not know that in a race all the runners run, but only one gets the prize? Run in such a way as to get the prize. Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever. Therefore I do not run like someone running aimlessly; I do not fight like a boxer beating the air. No, I strike a blow to my body and make it my slave so that after I have preached to others, I myself will not be disqualified for the prize.” 1 Corinthians 9:24-27


 

STUDIO ART LAB Elective Subject [NWS Year 10]

“God’s creative activity went far beyond the minimum Requirements for getting the job done. Butterflies in the rain forest seldom seen by human eyes are creatures of breathtaking beauty. The delicate transparency of the man-of-war and the hummingbird’s wing are inimitable …” Le Roy Koopman

Overview

This course is designed to give students a broad experience and knowledge of skills, techniques and processes. In the “Studio Art Lab” students will be able to interact, collaborate and share ideas with fellow classmates whilst at the same time independently exploring the world of creative art. Whether you’re an accomplished artist or an art novice this course will help you improve your drawing skills and unleash your inner creativity. The course will prepare students for further studies in the areas of VCE Art and Visual Communication Design, by giving students a variety of skills and techniques which can be applied in both areas of Study. By the end of the course, students will complete a portfolio demonstrating the application of skills and techniques learnt.

This course is highly recommended for those students who are considering studying VCE Art & Visual Communication Design.

Aims

  • To gain a knowledge of the nature of materials, techniques and working methods
  • To manipulate art elements and principles to effectively realise students’ ideas
  • To demonstrate a level of technical competence in the use of skills, techniques and processes
  • To develop artworks which reflect personal art responses to specific tasks
  • To document thinking and working practices

Topics Include

  • Drawing inspired by traditional and contemporary methods
  • Digital Printmaking using Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop
  • Mixed-Media techniques using painting, printmaking and collage
  • Acrylic painting on canvas
  • Sculptural exploration
  • Art Appreciation

Time Allocation

  • 4 periods per cycle, Semester 1

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy cost

Assessment

  • Art folio work
  • Written work/ Art analysis

"Listen to this, Job; stop and consider God's wonders. Job 37:14


 

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT [NWS VCE Subject]

Overview

As the Christian leaders of tomorrow, both in the church and in business, it is important that our students have a strong understanding of what it means to lead and manage. Business Management examines the ways in which people at various levels within a business organisation manage resources to achieve the objectives of the organisation. The study recognises that there is a range of management theories. In each unit, students examine some of these theories and through exposure to real business scenarios and direct contact with business, compare them with management in practice.

Content

Businesses of all sizes are major contributors to the economic and social wellbeing of a nation. Therefore, how businesses are formed and the fostering of conditions under which new business ideas can emerge are vital for a nation’s wellbeing. Taking a business idea and planning how to make it a reality are the cornerstones of economic and social development. In this unit students explore the factors affecting business ideas and the internal and external environments within which businesses operate and the effect of these on planning a business.

UNIT 1: PLANNING A BUSINESS AREAS OF STUDY

The Business Idea

In this area of study students investigate how business ideas are created and how conditions can be fostered for new business ideas to emerge. New business ideas are formed through a range of sources, such as identifying a gap in the market, technological developments and changing customer needs. Students explore some of the issues that need to be considered before a business can be established.

External Environment

The external environment consists of all elements outside a business that may act as pressures or forces on the operations of a business. Students consider factors from the external environment such as legal, political, social, economic, technological, global and corporate social responsibility factors and the effects these may have on the decisions made when planning a business. Students investigate how the internal environment relates to the external environment and the effects of this relationship on planning a business.

Internal Environment

The internal environment affects the approach to and success of business planning. The owner will generally have more control over the activities, functions and pressures that occur within a business. These factors, such as business models, legal business structures and staffing, will also be influenced to some extent by the external environment. Students explore the factors within the internal environment and consider how planning decisions may have an effect on the ultimate success of a business.

UNIT 2: ESTABLISHING A BUSINESS AREAS OF STUDY

Legal requirements And Financial Considerations

It is essential to deal with legal and financial matters when establishing a business. In this area of study students are introduced to the legal requirements and financial considerations that are vital to establishing a business. They also consider the implications for the business if these requirements are not met.

Marketing a Business

Establishing a strong customer base for a business is an important component of success. In this area of study students develop their understanding that marketing encompasses a wide range of management practices, from identifying the needs of the target market and establishing a brand presence, through to considerations on price, product features and packaging, promotion, place, people, physical evidence and processes. They also consider effective public relations strategies and the benefits and costs these can bring to a business.

Staffing a Business

Staff are one of the business’s greatest assets and are an important consideration when establishing a business. The quantity and quality of staff has a direct link to business productivity and the achievement of business objectives. In this area of study students examine the staffing requirements that will meet the needs and objectives of the business and contribute to productivity and effectiveness. They research the processes undertaken by the business with relation to the recruitment, selection and induction of staff. Students consider the opportunities that the skills and capabilities of staff can contribute to the business, the legal obligations that must be addressed and the relationship between employers and employees within a business.

Biblical Perspective

Biblical leadership principles are examined as students consider the application of management styles and skills to their own lives and to possible careers in a business environment. In addition, students will evaluate social responsibility and ethics in examining change in large organisations. The application of conflict resolution strategies (see Matt 18:15 and 1 Corinthians 6) will be considered. God has created us to be in relationship both with Himself and with our fellow human beings. Therefore, students must consider how strong, Christ-centred relationships can be developed and maintained as an integral part of harmonious interactions within the business organisation.

Assessment Units 1 & 2

  • Suitable tasks for Assessment may be selected from the following:
  • A case study analysis
  • A business research report
  • Development of a business plan and/or feasibility study
  • An interview and a report on contact with business
  • A school-based, short-term business activity
  • A business simulation exercise
  • An essay
  • A business survey and analysis
  • A media analysis

Assessment Unit 1

  • Assessment tasks for these units are selected from the following:
  • Case study analysis
  • Business research (print and online)
  • Development of a marketing and/or public relations plan
  • Interview and report on contact with business
  • Business simulation exercise
  • Essay
  • Test
  • Computer applications and simulations
  • Business survey and analysis
  • Analytical exercises
  • Media analysis
  • Report (written, visual, oral)

 

 

HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT [NWS VCE Subject]

Overview

This study is designed to enable students to:

  • Understand the complex nature of health and wellbeing, and human development
  • Develop a broad view of health and wellbeing, incorporating physical, social, emotional, mental and spiritual dimensions, and biological, sociocultural and environmental factors
  • Examine how health and wellbeing may be influenced across the lifespan by the conditions into which people are born, grow, live, work and age
  • Develop health literacy to evaluate health information and take appropriate and positive action to support health and wellbeing and manage risks
  • Develop understanding of the Australian healthcare system and the political and social values that underpin it
  • Apply social justice principles to identify health and wellbeing inequities and analyse health and wellbeing interventions
  • Apply the objectives of the united nations’ sustainable development goals to evaluate the effectiveness of health and wellbeing initiatives and programs
  • Propose and implement action to positively influence health and wellbeing, and human development, outcomes at individual, local, national and/or global levels

Content

UNIT 1: UNDERSTANDING HEALTH AND WELLBEING AREAS OF STUDY

Health perspectives and influences

This area of study takes a broad, multidimensional approach to health and wellbeing. Such an approach acknowledges that defining and measuring these concepts is complicated by a diversity of social and cultural contexts. Students consider the influence of age, culture, religion, gender and socioeconomic status on perceptions of and priorities relating to health and wellbeing. They look at measurable indicators of population health, and at data reflecting the health status of Australians. With a focus on youth, students enquire into reasons for variations and inequalities in health status, including sociocultural factors that contribute to variations in health behaviours.

Health and nutrition

This area of study explores food and nutrition as foundations for good health and wellbeing. Students investigate the roles and sources of major nutrients and the use of food selection models and other tools to promote healthy eating. They look at the health and wellbeing consequences of dietary imbalance, especially for youth, and consider the social, cultural and political factors that influence the food practices of and food choices made by youth. They develop strategies for building health literacy and evaluating nutrition information from various sources, including advertisements and social media.

Youth health and wellbeing

In this area of study students focus on the health and wellbeing of Australia’s youth, and conduct independent research into a selected area of interest. Students identify major health inequalities among Australia’s youth and reflect on the causes. They apply research skills to find out what young people are most focused on and concerned about with regard to health and wellbeing. Students inquire into how governments and organisations develop and implement youth health programs, and consider the use of health data and the influence of community values and expectations. Students select a particular focus area and conduct research, interpret data and draw conclusions on how the health and wellbeing of Australia’s youth can be promoted and improved.

UNIT 2: MANAGING HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENT AREAS OF STUDY

Developmental transitions

This area of study examines the developmental transitions from youth to adulthood, with a focus on expected changes, significant decisions, and protective factors, including behaviours. Students consider perceptions of what it means to be a youth and an adult and investigate the expected physical and social changes. They inquire into factors that influence both the transition from youth to adulthood and later health status. They consider the characteristics of respectful, healthy relationships. Students examine parenthood as a potential transition in life. With a focus on the influence of parents/carers and families, students investigate factors that contribute to development, health and wellbeing during the prenatal, infancy and early childhood stages of the lifespan. Health and wellbeing is considered as an intergenerational concept (that is, the health and wellbeing of one generation affects the next).

Health care in Australia

This area of study investigates the health system in Australia. Students examine the functions of various entities that play a role in our health system. They inquire into equity of access to health services, as well as the rights and responsibilities of individuals receiving care. Students research the range of health services in their communities and suggest how to improve health and wellbeing outcomes and health literacy in Australia. They explore a range of issues associated with the use of new and emerging health procedures and technologies such as reproductive technologies, artificial intelligence, robotics, nanotechnology, three-dimensional printing of body parts and use of stem cells.

Biblical Perspective

1 Corinthians 6:19 – 20 “Or didn't you realize that your body is a sacred place, the place of the Holy Spirit? Don't you see that you can't live however you please; squandering what God paid such a high price for? The physical part of you is not some piece of property belonging to the spiritual part of you. God owns the whole works. So let people see God in and through your body.” (The Message translation)

The central focus of the Health and Human Development study is to examine the factors that promote wellbeing in individuals, families and the community. This study aims to develop an understanding of the relationship between health and the various aspects of human development. It incorporates the truth that all life originates in God and that our health and wellbeing are important to Him as our Creator. The study explores the physical, social, emotional and mental aspects of health and development, beginning with the individual and progressing to family, local community and finally to the global stage. With the change in values in our society, students will be challenged to assess their responsibilities, and those of the community, in considering God’s word and developing a sense of stewardship and positive interaction for self, family and the community.

This study recognises that health and human development are influenced by lifestyle, environment, behaviour, politics, genetics and many other factors and the way these factors interact. It is hoped that students will learn to analyse and filter the information presented to them in a godly way and begin to use these principles to influence our society.

Assessment Units 1 & 2

  • All assessments at Units 1 and 2 are school-based. Procedures for assessments of levels of achievement in Units 1 and 2 are a matter for school decision.
  • Suitable tasks for assessments in this unit may be selected from the following:
  • A short written report, such as a media analysis, a research inquiry, a blog or a case study analysis
  • Oral presentation, such as a debate or a podcast
  • A visual presentation such as a graphic organiser, a concept/mind map, an annotated poster, a digital presentation
  • Structured questions, including data analysis

 

 

MEDIA [NWS VCE Subject]

Overview

We interact with the media every day, and the way we use the media is always changing.  The media influences the way in which people spend their time and how people perceive themselves and others, both positively and negatively.  This study encourages students to analyse and evaluate media products, production processes and policies through studying media forms which include traditional media forms such as radio, film, print media and television, as well as digital and social media. This study encourages students to consider the media they consume and create with greater intentionality and thoughtfulness.

Content

UNIT 1: MEDIA FORMS, REPRESENTATIONS AND AUSTRALIAN STORIES

In this unit, students develop an understanding of audiences and the core concepts underpinning the construction of representations and meaning in different media forms. They explore media codes and conventions and the construction of meaning in media products. Students analyse how representations, narrative and media codes and conventions contribute to the construction of the media realities audiences engage with and read. Students gain an understanding of audiences as producers and consumers of media products. They develop research skills to investigate and analyse selected narratives focusing on the influence of media professionals on production genre and style. Students develop an understanding of the features of Australian fictional and non-fictional narratives in different media forms. Students work in a range of media forms and develop and produce representations to demonstrate an understanding of the characteristics of each media form, and how they contribute to the communication of meaning.

Outcome 1: MEDIA REPRESENTATIONS

On completion of this unit, the student should be able to explain how media representations in a range of media products and forms, and from different periods of time, locations and contexts, are constructed, distributed, engaged with, consumed and read by audiences.

Outcome 2: MEDIA FORMS IN PRODUCTION

On completion of this unit, the student should be able to use the media production process to design, produce and evaluate media representations for specified audiences in a range of media forms.

Outcome 3: AUSTRALIAN STORIES

On completion of this unit the student should be able to analyse how the structural features of Australian fictional and non-fictional narratives in two or more media forms engage, and are consumed and read by, audiences.

UNIT 2: NARRATIVE ACROSS MEDIA FORMS

Fictional and non-fictional narratives are fundamental to the media and are found in all media forms. Media industries such as journalism and filmmaking are built upon the creation and distribution of narratives constructed in the form of a series of interconnected images, sounds and/or words, and using media codes and conventions. New media forms and technologies enable participants to design, create and distribute narratives in user-generated content, which challenges the traditional understanding of narrative form and content.

In this unit, students further develop an understanding of the concept of narrative in media products and forms in different contexts. Narratives in both traditional and newer forms include film, television, sound, news, print, photography, games, and interactive digital forms. Students analyse the influence of developments in media technologies on individuals and society, examining in a range of media forms the effects of media convergence and hybridisation on the design, production and distribution of narratives in the media and audience engagement, consumption and reception. Students undertake production activities to design and create narratives that demonstrate an awareness of the structures and media codes and conventions appropriate to corresponding media forms.

OUTCOME 1: NARRATIVE, STYLE AND GENRE

On completion of this unit the student should be able to analyse the intentions of media creators and producers and the influences of narratives on the audience in different media forms.

Outcome 2: NARRATIVES IN PRODUCTION

On completion of this unit the student should be able to apply the media production process to create, develop and construct narratives.

Outcome 3: MEDIA AND CHANGE

On completion of this unit the student should be able to discuss the influence of new media technologies on society, audiences, the individual, media industries and institutions.

UNIT 3: MEDIA NARRATIVES AND PRE-PRODUCTION AREAS OF STUDY

Narrative and Ideology

Narratives are fundamental to the relationship between the media and its audiences. Ideologies in society frame the nature, form and structure of narratives. Audiences and the media together frame the nature, form and development of discourses in society through the construction, distribution, reception and consumption of narratives that implicitly or explicitly comment on, reflect on, develop, reject or ignore ideologies.

Media narratives are the product of creative and institutional practices that represent ideas through media codes and conventions. The use of media codes and conventions influences audience engagement, consumption and reading of narratives. Other influential factors include the social, cultural, ideological and institutional contexts relating to the period of time and location in which the media narrative was produced, the purpose of the media narrative, the genre, style, content, particulars of distribution and consumption and reception. Students examine fictional narratives in the form of two feature length films.

On completion of this unit the student should be able to analyse how narratives are constructed and distributed, and how they engage, are consumed and are read by the intended audience and present day audiences.

Media Production Development

Media productions develop out of that which has come before. Media creators and producers frequently reference ideas and techniques that have been developed by others. Collecting, acknowledging and building upon ideas, structures, aesthetics and techniques informs the direction of media productions and an understanding of how audiences are engaged.

Students investigate and research a selected media form to inform the development of their proposed production. This research contributes to the direction of their production design. Students conduct an investigation of aspects of the media form in which they will work, developing knowledge of narrative, genre, style, media codes and conventions and aspects of the works of media practitioners relevant to their proposed production. Students develop production skills that inform the production, design and development of a media product. They record their learning in documented research, annotated production activities, experiments, exercises and reflections.

Media Production Design

Media production designs are a set of written and visual documents that detail the stages of production of a proposed product. The production design communicates both creative vision and thorough planning. Audience engagement consumption and reception is at the heart of media production. Audiences may be delineated by demographic or social factors, identified by their interests and experience in media works, forms, genres or styles, or created by media institutions or individual producers for a particular purpose. Detailed articulation of audience/s and how they will be engaged underpins all aspects of a media production design. Informed by their learning in Area of Study 2, students use industry specific design and planning, both in written and visual documentation, to complete a media production design. The design incorporates a clear fictional and/ or non-fictional narrative for a specified audience in a selected media form as outlined below. Students take into account the relevant media codes and conventions of the selected media form. The production design is developed for one of the following media forms:

  • A video or film production of 3–10 minutes in length
  • An animated production of no more than 10 minutes in length
  • A radio or an audio production of a minimum of 8 minutes in length
  • A digital or an analogue photographic presentation, sequence or series of a minimum of 10 original sourced images shot, processed and edited by the student
  • A digital or traditional print production of a minimum of 8 pages produced and edited by the student 

UNIT 4: MEDIA PRODUCTION AND ISSUES IN THE MEDIA AREAS OF STUDY

Media Production

The production, post-production and distribution stages of a media product are a natural progression from the pre-production stage of the media production process. Students move from production into post-production where the manipulation, arrangement or layering of the ideas and material generated in pre-production and production leads to the realisation of their production design.

Media creators and producers reflect on and work with others to gain insight into whether their products communicate their planned intent, refining their products in the production and post-production stages. Students undertake personal reflection and seek feedback on their work, developing, refining and resolving their product as a result. They document iterations of their production after considering the factors that have influenced the development, refinement of materials, technologies and processes, the resolution of ideas and the effect they have had on the final product.

The creation and production of the media product is an individual undertaking. On completion of this unit the student should be able to produce, refine and resolve a media product designed in Unit 3.

Agency and Control in and of the media

The relationship between the media and audiences has never been more complex. The contemporary media landscape poses issues and challenges for the way that academics and commentators have traditionally theorised the nature of communication. The media has always been considered to have the capacity to influence, but now the balance of power is shifting and arguments around who influences who have become highly contested. The media and its audiences are now both thought to exercise agency; the capacity to act and exert power.

Today the media not only produces and distributes content to audiences, it also generates and sustains social networks, which have, in turn, enabled new modes of production, distribution, consumption and reception based on the sharing of commercial and user-generated content.

As the media increasingly crosses national borders, governments struggle to maintain control over the laws and policies created for their jurisdictions. These issues pose challenges for managing and regulating the use of the media by globalised media institutions, governments and the individual.

On completion of this unit the student should be able to discuss issues of agency and control in the relationship between the media and its audience.

 

Biblical Perspective

The media's influence upon society has been profound.  In teaching students to analyse and evaluate the media, this study encourages students to critically examine the media from a Christian worldview. God has also designed us to be creative beings, and students are encouraged to use their God-given creativity to produce thoughtful, inspired media products.

Assessment Units 1 & 2

Assessment tasks are selected from:

  • Audiovisual or video sequences
  • Radio or audio sequences
  • Photographs
  • Print layouts
  • Sequences or presentations using digital technologies
  • Posters
  • Written responses
  • Oral reports

UNIT 3

School-Assessed Coursework

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks Allocated*

Outcome 1

Analyse how narratives are constructed and distributed, and how they engage, are consumed and are read by the intended audience and present day audiences.

Short responses

Structured questions

40

TOTAL MARKS

40

*School–assessed coursework for Unit 3 contributes 8% to the study score

School-Assessed Task

Outcomes

Components of the school-assessed task

Marks Allocated

Outcome 2

Research aspects of a media form and experiment with media technologies and media production processes to inform and document the design of a media production.

A research portfolio and accompanying documentation examining aspects of the selected media form

Production exercises with accompanying documentation that demonstrate a range of skills in the use of media technologies and production processes relevant to the student selected media form

The School-assessed Task for Units 3 and 4 will contribute 40% to the study score

Outcome 3

Develop and document a media production design in a selected media form for a specified audience.

A media production design plan based on the selected media form identified in Unit 3, Outcome 2.

The School-assessed Task for Units 3 and 4 will contribute 40% to the study score

UNIT 4

School-Assessed Coursework

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks Allocated*

Outcome 2

Discuss issues of agency and control in the relationship between the media and its audience.

Short responses

Structured questions

40

TOTAL MARKS

40

*School –assessed coursework for Unit 4 contributes 12% to the study score

School-Assessed Task

Outcomes

Components of the school-assessed task

Marks allocated

Outcome 1

Produce, refine and resolve a media product for an identified audience from the media production design plan prepared by the student in Unit 3

A media product developed from the media production design produced in Unit 3

The School-assessed Task for Units 3 and 4 will contribute 40% to the study score

External Assessment

The level of achievement for Units 3 and 4 is also assessed by an end-of-year examination, which will contribute 40%.

 

 

PSYCHOLOGY [NWS VCE Subject]

Overview

This study enables students to:

  • Apply psychological models, theories and concepts to describe, explain and analyse observations and ideas related to human thoughts, emotions and behaviour
  • Examine the ways that a biopsychosocial approach can be applied to organise, analyse and extend knowledge in psychology
  • Understand the cooperative, cumulative, evolutionary and interdisciplinary nature of science as a human endeavour, including its possibilities, limitations and political and sociocultural influences
  • Develop a range of individual and collaborative science investigation skills through experimental and inquiry tasks in the field and in the laboratory
  • Develop an informed perspective on contemporary science-based issues of local and global significance
  • Apply their scientific understanding to familiar and to unfamiliar situations, including personal, social, environmental and technological contexts
  • Develop attitudes that include curiosity, open-mindedness, creativity, flexibility, integrity, attention to detail and respect for evidence-based conclusions
  • Understand and apply the research, ethical and safety principles that govern the study and practice of the discipline in the collection, analysis, critical evaluation and reporting of data
  • Communicate clearly and accurately an understanding of the discipline using appropriate terminology, conventions and formats.

Content

UNIT 1: HOW ARE BEHAVIOUR AND MENTAL PROCESSES SHAPED? AREAS OF STUDY

How Does The Brain Function?

Advances in brain research methods have led to new ways of understanding the relationship between the mind, brain and behaviour. In this area of study students examine how our understanding of brain structure and function has changed over time and how the brain enables us to interact with the external world around us. They analyse the roles of specific areas of the brain and the interactions between different areas of the brain that enable complex cognitive tasks to be performed. Students explore how brain plasticity and brain damage can affect a person’s functioning.

What Influences Psychological Development?

The psychological development of an individual involves complex interactions between biological, psychological and social factors. In this area of study students explore how these factors influence different aspects of a person’s psychological development. They consider the interactive nature of hereditary and environmental factors and investigate specific factors that may lead to development of typical or atypical psychological development in individuals, including a person’s emotional, cognitive and social development and the development of psychological disorders.

Student-Directed Research Investigation

In this area of study students apply and extend their knowledge and skills developed in Areas of Study 1 and/or 2 to investigate a question related to brain function and/or psychological development. Students analyse the scientific evidence that underpins the research in response to a question of interest. They then communicate the findings of their research investigation and explain the psychological concepts, outline contemporary research and present conclusions based on the evidence.

UNIT 2: HOW DO EXTERNAL FACTORS INFLUENCE BEHAVIOUR AND MENTAL PROCESSES? AREAS OF STUDY

What Influences A Person’s Perception Of The World?

Human perception of internal and external stimuli is influenced by a variety of biological, psychological and social factors. In this area of study students explore two aspects of human perception – vision and taste – and analyse the relationship between sensation and perception of stimuli. They consider how biological, psychological and social factors can influence a person’s perception of visual and taste stimuli, and explore circumstances where perceptual distortions of vision and taste may occur.

How Are People Influenced To Behave In Particular Ways?

A person’s social cognition and behaviour influence the way they view themselves and the way they relate to others. In this area of study students explore the interplay of biological, psychological and social factors that shape the behaviour of individuals and groups. They consider how these factors can be used to explain the cause and dynamics of particular individual and group behaviours, including attitude formation, prejudice, discrimination, helping behaviour and bullying. Students examine the findings of classical and contemporary research as a way of theorising and explaining individual and group behaviour.

Student-Directed Practical Investigation

In this area of study students design and conduct a practical investigation related to external influences on behaviour. The investigation requires the student to develop a question, plan a course of action to answer the question, undertake an investigation to collect the appropriate primary qualitative and/or quantitative data, organise and interpret the data and reach a conclusion in response to the question. The investigation relates to knowledge and skills developed in Areas of Study 1 and/or 2 and is undertaken by the student using either quantitative or qualitative methods, including experiments, surveys, questionnaires, observational studies and/or rating scales.

Biblical Perspective

To better understand ourselves in order to further develop our God-given potential

To have a better understanding of the behaviour of others in order to relate more effectively in personal and professional life

Through an understanding of “scientific” Psychology, to appreciate its relevance to Biblical principles

Assessment Unit 1

Outcome 1: Test

Outcome 2: Empirical Research Activity on Piaget’s Theory of Development

Outcome 3: Report of an investigation

Assessment Unit 2

Outcome 1: Test and Visual perception annotated presentation

Outcome 2: Social behaviour media analysis

Outcome 3: External influences on behaviour scientific poster