Year 8

YEAR 8 [WS Year 8]

All Secondary subject courses are written into a four year curriculum framework, so students can use and develop the skills of previous years, as they prepare for VCE studies, and their future.

The Year 8 curriculum is divided into 2 sections – Core subjects and Elective subjects, and is designed to allow students to begin to exercise choice and experience a wide selection of sub learning opportunities. Teachers recommend that students consider their elective choices in the light of:

  • Personal interests
  • Individual giftings and talents
  • Possible career choices

At this year level, Electives are designed to give foundational skills, and to encourage interest and participation. If a student chooses to continue studying an Elective in Year 9, these skills will be further developed.

Waverley Christian College has a rich extra-curricular program, with many opportunities for enrichment and engagement. We encourage all students to get involved in activities of interest to them. See ‘Co-curricular Activities’ for a list of available options.

 

 

BIBLICAL STUDIES Core Subject [WS Year 8]

“A thorough knowledge of the Bible is worth more than a college education.” Theodore Roosevelt

Overview

Year 8 Biblical Studies covers The Kings & Prophets of Israel. It focuses on an area of the Bible that students need to understand if they are to be able to read and learn from the books that are contained within it.

Aims

  • To help students master the timeline and historical detail of the Kings and Prophets of Israel
  • To help students grow in their appreciation and awareness of the Biblical Prophets
  • To continue to build the students understanding of the unfolding revelation of God that climaxes in the life and death of Jesus
  • For students to read and be thoroughly versed in the text of the Book of Revelation
  • For students to be able to explain and find links between the text of Revelation and the situation of the late first century church.
  • To continue to build the discipline of Bible reading in the life of the student

Topics Include

  • Kings and Prophets of Israel

Time Allocation

  • 3 periods per cycle

Requirements

  • NIV or any full translation of the Bible

Assessment

  • Bible Reading Plans
  • Research Assignments
  • Tests

“Consequently, faith comes from hearing the message, and the message is heard through the word about Christ.” Romans 10:17

 

 

ENGLISH Core Subject [WS Year 8]

“We must contemplate the import of ignoring the printed word. If you cannot read, you can do only what you are told.” Joseph P. Bean

Overview

SEMESTER 1: Students will focus on the elements of text analysis, analysing a film text to discover the purpose and meaning conveyed. Through analysing this text, students will focus on elements and construction of characters; and how characters are used to tell stories. Students will be asked to consider character traits that are biblically important as compared to those that are valued by a secular society. Students will also increase their understanding of persuasive language and be asked to critically examine different articles and the messages that they are trying to convey. Students will engage in both writing and oral tasks that require them to utilise persuasive techniques.

SEMESTER 2: Students will examine the importance of signifiacnt historical events and how they affect us. Through the use of a historical narrative students will engage in understanding how authors draw inspiration from real world events in order to inform their writing. Through this narrative students will be encouraged to examine how faith can be seen even in the darkest of times. Students will focus on both writing analytically and comparatively, and further developing the required skills for both. Throughout the text study we will consider themes of family, forgiveness, friendship and how ultimately it is Jesus that is the hope of the world. Students will also have an opportunity to further explore the elements of poetry, both in reading poetic texts and creating their own poetry. Students will be encouraged to engage with the creation of poetry as a form of worship, as we examine selected biblical texts.

Aims

  • To develop the ability to appraise the content of written work
  • To teach reasoning and clear thinking skills
  • To teach the basics of presenting arguments – written and spoken
  • To develop research and reporting techniques
  • To encourage enjoyment in both reading and listening
  • To teach effective oral communication skills
  • To use the God-given gifts of creativity and discernment

Topics Include

  • Film Text: Hook
  • Novels: Once
  • Australian short stories and poetry
  • Written expression: essays, descriptive writing, predictions
  • Issues:  role plays, opinion writing
  • Oral Presentations

Time Allocation

  • 8 periods per cycle

Requirements

  • Booklist Items

Assessment

  • Spelling and grammar
  • Reading and studying texts
  • Writing folio
  • Issues
  • Speaking and listening
  • Examinations

“They read from the Book of the Law of God, making it clear and giving them meaning so that the people could understand what was being read” Nehemiah 8:8

 

 

GEOGRAPHY Core Subject [WS Year 8]

God left His fingerprints all over creation. Byron Snapp

Overview

There are two units of study in the Year 8 curriculum for Geography: Landforms and Landscapes and Changing nations. Landforms and Landscapes focuses on investigating geomorphology through a study of landscapes and their landforms. This unit examines the processes that shape individual landforms, the values and meanings placed on landforms and landscapes by diverse cultures, hazards associated with landscapes, and management of landscapes. Changing nations investigates the changing human geography of countries, as revealed by shifts in population distribution. The unit explores the process of urbanisation and draws on a study of a country of the Asia region to show how urbanisation changes the economies and societies of low and middle-income countries. It investigates the reasons for the high level of urban concentration in Australia, one of the distinctive features of Australia’s human geography and then examines issues related to the management and future of Australia’s urban areas.

Aims

  • To enable students to use further develop understanding and analysis of various geographic data
  • To recognise the reliance of humans upon the natural environment and its processes and how humans change and impact the environment
  • To understand that natural resources belong to God and we are stewards of the earth and responsible to care for it
  • To develop students’ understanding of the concept of environment and enable them to explore the significance of landscapes to people
  • By the end of the unit, students will have a greater understanding of the types and scales of interactions that occur between humans and natural environments

Topics Include

  • Landforms and landscapes, including coastal and volcanic landscapes
  • Changing nations, including urbanisation and migration
  • Analysing geographic / visual data

Time Allocation

  • 6 periods per cycle for one semester

Requirements

  • Booklist Items
  • Coastal fieldwork report
  • Landforms and landscapes assignment
  • Changing nations task
  • Examination
Assessment

“The earth is the Lord’s, and everything in it, the world, and all who live in it”. Psalm 24:1

 

 

HISTORY Core Subject [WS Year 8]

“What are all histories but God manifesting himself, shaking down and trampling under foot whatsoever he hath not planted.” Oliver Cromwell

Overview

This course aims to develop in students an appreciation of the life and times of medieval societies by examining how medieval values, ideas, laws and the rise of Christianity have impacted the world today.  Students are encouraged to think critically and evaluate various aspects of medieval societies in both Europe and Asia, and will investigate the world of knights, castles, chivalry, Renaissance and Reformation through activities such as class discussions, model construction, projects and Internet investigations.  Depth studies include Medieval Europe and Feudal Japan.

Aims

  • To describe key features of life in medieval society
  • To examine how religious beliefs and practices influenced medieval societies
  • To identify features of the Feudal system
  • To examine medieval tradition and to identify its links to the modern world
  • To identify how Renaissance ideas have impacted the modern world
  • To develop the intellectual skills of inquiry and critical thinking, and apply knowledge to develop and communicate understandings
  • To develop independent research skills in using a variety of sources, including learning technologies
  • To understand that God is sovereign and ultimately in control; no man or nation can over-rule Him

Topics Include

  • Feudal Japan
  • Medieval Europe
  • Renaissance and Reformation

Time Allocation

  • 6 periods per cycle for one semester

Requirements

  • Booklist Items

Assessment

  • Research Tasks
  • Projects and Posters
  • Models
  • Role-plays
  • Source Analysis
  • Tests & Examination

“Write on a scroll what you see and send it to the seven churches: to Ephesus, Smyrna, Pergamum, Thyatira, Sardis, Philadelphia and Laodicea.” “Write, therefore, what you have seen, what is now and what will take place later.” Revelation 1:11,19

 

 

LOTE: Chinese Core Subject [WS Year 8]

A man who is ignorant of foreign languages is ignorant of his own. Johann Goethe

Overview

The Chinese Program promotes awareness of the culture of China and the multi-cultural nature of Australia. It is a sequential program, which fosters a student’s ability to communicate in speech and writing, as well as developing effective listening and reading skills in the Chinese language. The main topics include pets, nationalities and languages, sports, descriptions of a friend, and food and drinks.

Aims

  • To introduce the students to the structure and flow of Chinese
  • To lay a foundation for further studies in Chinese
  • To give the students an understanding of China, its culture, traditions and values
  • To encourage students to develop a competence in the usage of Chinese in both spoken and written form
  • To help the student understand the multilingual and multicultural Australian society

Topics Include

  • Sports and activities
  • At school
  • Food and shopping
  • Dates and birthdays

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle

Requirements

  • Booklist Items
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Participation in communication activities (oral)
  • Completion of set tasks
  • Participation in classroom activities
  • Ability to understand and follow instructions
  • Examination

“The Lord said, “If as one people speaking the same language they have begun to do this, then nothing they plan to do will be impossible for them. Come, let us go down and confuse their language so they will not understand each other.” That is why it was called Babel – because there the Lord confused the language of the whole world. From there the Lord scattered them over the face of the whole earth.” Genesis 11:6-7, 9


 

LOTE: French Core Subject [WS Year 8]

A man who is ignorant of foreign languages is ignorant of his own. Johann Goethe

Overview

Students understand that language originates from God, by studying French they gain insight into the world that God has given us and that he has commanded us to care for. Students continue to use written and spoken French to interact with teachers, peers and others and exchange experiences, opinions and views. They use strategies such as emphasis, repetition and summary to support fluency and expression in performances and discussions. They plan, draft and present imaginative and informative texts, using simple and compound sentences. Students use regular (-er) verbs in the Present Tense form independently as well as high-frequency irregular verbs (être & avoir). They can use verbs in affirmative and negative forms. Students begin to make appropriate language choices when communicating, in various contexts, in French.

Aims

  • To introduce the students to the structure and flow of French
  • To lay a foundation for further studies in French
  • To give the students an understanding of France, its culture, traditions and values
  • To encourage students to develop a competence in the usage of French in both spoken and written form
  • To help the student understand the multilingual and multicultural Australian society

Topics Include

  • My house, my bedroom
  • Schooling / School, subjects, classroom materials, grades and timetables
  • Pastimes and leisure activities
  • Directions (asking and giving directions)
  • In town

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle

Requirements

  • Booklist Items
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Participation in communication activities (oral)
  • Completion of set tasks
  • Participation in classroom activities
  • Ability to understand and follow instructions
  • Examination

“The Lord said, “If as one people speaking the same language they have begun to do this, then nothing they plan to do will be impossible for them. Come, let us go down and confuse their language so they will not understand each other.” That is why it was called Babel – because there the Lord confused the language of the whole world. From there the Lord scattered them over the face of the whole earth.” Genesis 11:6-7, 9

 

 

MATHEMATICS Core Subject [WS Year 8]

“God uses mathematics in everything He makes. He makes things in multiples of sevens, elevens, and forties. Everything that God does, He does according to mathematics: the writing of His Bible, the making of Arcturus and establishing the circuit of the earth. He imparts some of that wonderful knowledge to us that we may know something about His grace and love for us is this respect.” Asa Sparks

Overview

Mathematics incorporates skills practice, standard applications, problem solving, project work and testing. Students are generally expected to complete the coursework for their designated year level; however, although students should utilise their talents faithfully, they have been given different levels of gifting by God. Hence, students may undertake modified work requirements in some cases in order to consolidate fundamental mathematical skills whereas other students may work on an advanced program which develops a deeper understanding of set topics and extends students to provide access to more complex applications, enabling greater access to advanced mathematics options in senior year levels.

Aims

  • To develop students to their fullest mathematical potential according to their unique God-given talent
  • To appreciate the way in which mathematics reflects the order in God’s Creation
  • To develop the students’ understanding of the concepts of number and space and their inter-relationship
  • To deepen the students’ awareness and understanding of mathematics as a functional tool in solving everyday problems
  • To appreciate the historical development of Mathematical concepts

Topics Include

  • Algebra
  • Cartesian Graphs
  • Directed Numbers
  • Geometry
  • Indices
  • Linear Equations
  • Measurement
  • Percentages & Money
  • Probability & Statistics
  • Problem Solving
  • Ratios

Time Allocation

  • 8 periods per cycle, streamed according to ability

Requirements

  • Booklist Items
  • Calculator

Assessment

  • Assignments and Projects
  • Classwork including Online Tasks and Problem Solving Tasks
  • Topic Tests
  • Semester Examinations

“He determines the number of the stars and calls them each by name” Psalm 147:4

 

 

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT Core Subject [WS Year 8]

“All men have their frailties; and whoever looks for a friend without imperfections, will never find what he seeks. We love ourselves notwithstanding our faults, and we ought to love our friends in like manner.” Cyrus the Great, founder of the Persian empire

Overview

Personal Development aims to equip students to deal with issues, in line with Christian values. Throughout their time in secondary school, students will be encouraged to maintain a focus on personal reflection, goal setting for growth and making a difference in the world. Personal Development provides support and a forum to discuss and process issues of importance to their age group.

Aims

  • To assist students in their spiritual and emotional development
  • To promote Christian character development
  • To give a Biblical framework for various issues confronting students
  • To enable students to grow in confidence through sharing ideas in a group setting
  • To develop a biblical Christian worldview
  • To see students equipped to make a difference in their world

Topics Include

Throughout the year the following topics will be covered:

  • Goal setting
  • Grief
  • Peer-pressure
  • Smoking
  • Community Service
  • Body Image
  • Relationship with others
  • Communication
  • Revision techniques
  • Addiction
  • Mind Matters Resiliency
  • Resiliency
  • Pornography

Time Allocation

  • 2 periods per cycle

Assessment

  • Students are expected to be actively involved in class discussions and activities

“Teacher, which is the great commandment in the Law?” Jesus replied, “‘Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind.’ This is the first and greatest commandment. And the second is like it: ‘Love your neighbour as yourself.’ Matthew 22:36-39

 

 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION Core Subject [WS Year 8]

“The world would have us believe that winning or success is measured by points on a scoreboard or by dollar signs. The Christian realises that winning or success is determined by whether or not a goal has been achieved, and that goal is to bring glory to God.” Thomas M. Boqdon

Overview

Students investigate a number of different strategies using a ‘game sense’ approach, where the focus is not only on technical proficiency, but a greater emphasis is placed on the development of tactics and decision-making. Students will expolore a range of activities that will enhance the development of previously learnt skills, improve physical fitness and promote a healthy lifestyle. Through involvement in the small-sided games, students develop a Christian perspective towards cometition with a view to promoting sportsmanship and coopration

Aims

  • To improve skill level under competitive pressure
  • To improve transfer of skills across games
  • To improve decision-making
  • To improve use of space in games
  • To develop teamwork and cooperation
  • To develop leadership skills
  • To maximize participation
  • To increase fun, enjoyment and motivation

Topics Include

  • Australian Rules Football
  • Racquet Sports (Bat Tennis)
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Fitness
  • Touch Rugby
  • International Sports (Lacrosse and Gaelic Football)
  • House Sports: Athletics, Ball Sports, Bat Tennis, Cross Country, Swimming
  • Interschool Sports: Football, Basketball, Soccer, Netball, Tennis, Super 8’s Cricket, Badminton, 5-a-side Soccer, Volleyball, Lawn Bowls
  • Interschool Carnivals: Athletics, Cross Country, Swimming

Time Allocation

  • 3 periods per cycle

Requirements

  • Physical Education uniform as per College Handbook
  • A mouth-guard is recommended to be used for activities that involve a higher level of physical contact
  • A sport levy is charged via the College Fees for Interschool Sport and activities

Assessment

  • Attitude and Effort
  • Game-Sense Rubrics
  • Fitness level against Age and Gender norms

“Do you not know that in a race all the runners run, but only one gets the prize? Run in such a way as to get the prize. Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever. Therefore, I do not run like someone running aimlessly; I do not fight like a boxer beating the air. No, I strike a blow to my body and make it my slave so that after I have preached to others, I myself will not be disqualified for the prize.” 1 Corinthians 9:24-27


 

SCIENCE Core Subject [WS Year 8]

“The Christian faith of the early scientists gave them more than presuppositions; it also gave them motivation. They believed that in studying nature they were discovering the wisdom and power of the Creator and were thus honouring Him.” James F. Jekel

Overview

Science seeks to develop the students’ abilities to ask questions and to find answers about aspects of God’s creation. The laws which govern Creation have many applications in our daily lives. Students will practically investigate, verify and apply these laws and shall identify and resolve, where possible, the problems associated with our physical world which have occurred as a result of the fallen state of humanity. Consequently, students are reminded of the moral responsibility of God’s children to serve Him faithfully as stewards of the resources and the materials which He has made available to us. A range of career-based and domestic applications of the study of science will be covered to better equip students to serve God with greater understanding.

Aims

  • To retain awe and wonder when contemplating God’s marvelous Creation
  • To foster and develop curiosity about all aspects of the earth and the universe
  • To emphasise both the potential of science as well as its limits
  • To help students co-discover many facts, laws and principles that have been previously discovered by earlier investigators of nature and the cosmos
  • To increase students’ powers of observation
  • To develop abilities to design and carry out experiments and analyse the resultant data
  • To develop abilities to evaluate evidence and solve problems

Topics Include

  • Body Systems
  • Cells and Microscopes
  • Atomic Theory and Chemistry
  • Energy
  • Geology
  • Sustainability
  • Reproduction
  • Experimental Research
  • Practical investigation

Time Allocation

  • 6 periods per cycle

Requirements

  • Booklist Items

Assessment

  • Unit Tests
  • Assignments
  • Notebooks
  • Practical Investigation and Reports
  • Semester Examinations
  • Homework

“But ask the animals, and they will teach you, or the birds in the sky, and they will tell you; or speak to the earth, and it will teach you, or let the fish in the sea inform you. Which of all these does not know that the hand of the Lord has done this? In his hand is the life of every creature and the breath of all mankind.” Job 12:7-10

 

 

ART: Sketch, Draw, Paint Elective Subject [WS Year 8]

“For the Christian, God is the supreme artist … God looked at His creation as it progressed and saw that it was good; when He had completed it, He said it was ‘very good’… The Great Artist was evidently much pleased with His world.” Clyde S. Kilby (Christianity and Aesthetics)

Overview

Art provides opportunities for the development of a visual language through artistic practice using a range of art materials. Students learn to apply tone and form effectively through the study of drawing. Watercolour and acrylic painting explore the art element of colour and development skills in brush mark making. They demonstrate the use of skills, techniques, and processes to express ideas and convey meaning in their artworks. Students are encouraged to make creative and personal responses to specific tasks and are provided opportunities for imaginative exploration, development and refinement of ideas. Students identify and describe artworks from different times and places and how ideas are interpreted by audiences.

Aims

Creating and making

  • To manipulate arts elements and principles effectively
  • To demonstrate a level of technical competence in the use of skills, techniques and processes – drawing and painting
  • To develop artworks which reflect personal art responses to specific tasks
  • Exploring and responding
  • To research and critically analyse and interpret artworks using appropriate arts language

Topics Include

  • Drawing: contour, tone
  • Colour theory and research
  • Watercolour and Acrylic Painting
  • Collage

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle for Semester 2

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Booklist Items
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • All class work; research and developmental work, practical projects and finished artworks
  • Written work and assignments

“He has made everything beautiful in its time. He has also set eternity in the human heart; yet no one can fathom what God has done from beginning to end.” Ecclesiastes 3:11

 

 

ART: Sketch, Draw, Print Elective Subject [WS Year 8]

“For the Christian, God is the supreme artist … God looked at His creation as it progressed and saw that it was good; when He had completed it, He said it was ‘very good’… The Great Artist was evidently much pleased with His world.” Clyde S. Kilby (Christianity and Aesthetics)

Overview

Art provides opportunities for the development of a visual language through artistic practice using a range of art materials. Students explore scraperboard, pastel drawing and stencil design. They learn a variety of skills, techniques, and processes to express ideas and convey meaning in their artworks. Students are encouraged to make creative and personal responses to specific tasks and are provided opportunities for imaginative exploration, development and refinement of ideas. Students identify and describe artworks from different times and places and how ideas are interpreted by audiences.

Aims

Creating and making

  • To manipulate arts elements and principles effectively on scraperboard, paper and fabric
  • To demonstrate a level of technical competence in the use of drawing skills, techniques and printing processes
  • To develop pastel artworks which reflect personal art responses to specific tasks
  • Exploring and responding
  • To research and critically analyse and interpret artworks using appropriate arts language
  • To describe the stylistic, technical, expressive and aesthetic features of artworks

Topics Include

  • Scraperboard
  • Tone and texture drawing using dry pastels and oil pastels
  • Colour Theory
  • Printmaking
  • Painting

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle for Semester 1

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Booklist Items
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • All class work; research and developmental work, practical projects and finished artworks
  • Written work and assignments

“He has made everything beautiful in its time. He has also set eternity in the human heart; yet no one can fathom what God has done from beginning to end.” Ecclesiastes 3:11

 

 

DESIGN TECHNOLOGY: Engineering Elective Subject [WS Year 8]

“In a small way human creative hands imitate this profusion of God, going beyond the minimum requirements of getting the job done. Creative hands are not content to spread on the frosting; they must make a tasteful arrangement of swirls and colour. They don’t just apply a coat of varnish; they polish the surface until it glows like satin.  Creative hands do more than plant seeds; they place them in a tasteful and eye-pleasing garden arrangement.” LeRoy Koopman

Overview

Students in Engineering Design are immersed in the creative process of solving problems by identifying needs and then developing solutions. Depending on the problem, the solution may be a product, technique, structure, process or a combination of multiple elements. This course is intended to stimulate student’s ingenuity, creative and critical thinking and practical skills in devising solutions to engineering design problems. Students use the engineering design process to investigate, design, plan, test, produce and eveluate solutions. Students will be challenged to break problems down into smaller parts, taking risks and playing with their own ideas. The Engineering elective is a practical course which provides opportunities for students to develop knowledge, understanding and skills in relations to general engineering concepts. Students will explore broad topics in Electrical, Structural and Software engineering.

Aims

  • Provide students with opportunities to apply maths, geometry and reasoning skills in practical, relevant and contextualised ways
  • Students will explore computational skills through coding, programming and electronics
  • Develop Technological, problem-solving and hands-on practical skills
  • To solve an engineering problem, the students would need to design parts, build them, write code and then evaluate their success. This problem solving process will allow them to be inventors of both hardware and software in creative and exciting ways
  • Explore many career fields; including engineering, science, mathematics, computer aided design (CAD) and electronics
  • CAD drawing and designing: Using Autodesk Fusion 360

Topics Include

  • Soldering - Simon Says kit/electronics kit
  • Computer Science - Unity Game Development
  • Computer Aided Design (CAD): Autodesk Fusion 360
  • Bridge Building
  • Engineering Design Process

Time Allocation

  • 4 periods for the whole year

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Use of technology and equipment
  • Engineering design process - logbook
  • Creative and critical thinking
  • Classroom participation

“The Lord said to Moses, “See I have chosen Bezalel and I have filled him with the Spirit of God, with skill, ability and knowledge in all kinds of crafts – to make artistic designs for work in gold, silver and bronze, to cut and set stones, to work in wood, and to engage in all kinds of craftsmanship. Moreover, I have appointed Oholiab to help him. Also I have given skills to all the craftsmen to make everything I have commanded you.” Exodus31:1

 

 

DESIGN TECHNOLOGY: Wood and Composites Elective Subject [WS Year 8]

“In a small way human creative hands imitate this profusion of God, going beyond the minimum requirements of getting the job done. Creative hands are not content to spread on the frosting; they must make a tasteful arrangement of swirls and colour. They don’t just apply a coat of varnish; they polish the surface until it glows like satin.  Creative hands do more than plant seeds; they place them in a tasteful and eye-pleasing garden arrangement.” LeRoy Koopman

Overview

Design and Technology aims to introduce and develop a systematic and creative approach to generating technological solutions. Students will gain the ability to apply knowledge and skills by using a variety of equipment, tools and materials while incorporating the elements of design.Activities may include: designing and producing practical projects using wood as the main material; discussions and demonstrations on safe workshop practices; developing skills and knowledge of hand and power tools.Technology is more than a tool or a machine; its meaning is much broader than that. There is creativity, patience and skills in a process that starts with a human need and ends with the realization of a designed solution.  It is central to being human and integral to civilization. If we understand Technology in this way then not only does it include tools and techniques but also organizational and cultural aspects defined by our Christian values and beliefs.

Aims

  • To understand and use the design process
  • To gain knowledge on the properties and characteristics for various timbers
  • To produce creative projects
  • To develop skills in using tools, machinery and equipment while producing practical work
  • To understand and follow the correct safety procedures in the workshop
  • To develop design and drawing skills

Topics Include

  • Designing and making creative wood projects
  • Workshop safety
  • Crafting techniques – manual and mechanical

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle
  • This unit is offered in both Semesters 1 and 2

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Booklist Items
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Marks assigned to workshop skills
  • Classroom activities
  • Completed projects
  • Safety in the workshop

“Let the favor of the Lord our God be upon us; establish the work of our hands for us. Yes, establish the work of our hands.” Psalm 90:17

 

 

DRAMA: Beginning Acting Elective Subject [WS Year 8]

“Thinking cannot be clear till it has had expression. We must write, or speak, or act our thoughts, or they will remain in a half torpid form. Our feelings must have expression, or they will be as clouds, which, till they descend as rain, will never bring up fruit or flower. So it is with the inward feelings; expression gives them development.” Henry Ward Beecher

Overview

This unit aims to provide varied opportunities for students to perform and create dramatic works. Students will be introduced to the basic elements of the art of performance. The emphasis in this unit is on developing communication, confidence, commitment and cooperation.

Aims

By the completion of this unit students will have enhanced their:

  • Communication skills and Social co-operation
  • Confidence and self esteem
  • Commitment and co-operation
  • Ability to project their voice
  • Stage presence
  • Improvisational skills

Topics Include

  • Projection: The ability to perform in a number of different situations and be heard and understood by the audience
  • Expression: The ability to draw an audience and use your body to express most effectively what it is you are trying to communicate, as well as increase the effectiveness other performers on stage
  • Improvisation: The ability to think on one’s feet, especially in performance scenarios, to the effect of increasing the actor’s instincts
  • Group Interactions: The skill of responding, giving place to, and enhancing scenes with other actors on stage, knowing when to fall to the background or take centre stage and everything in between
  • Theatre Styles: Learning about comedy and its various forms within them through observation and practical workshops

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle for Semester 1

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Booklist Items

Assessment

  • Individual participation in class activities
  • Group participation on set class tasks including live performances
  • Written responses and research tasks on a variety of theatre styles

“No-one ever spoke the way this man does.” John 7:4


 

DRAMA: The Stage and the Body Elective Subject [WS Year 8]

“Thinking cannot be clear till it has had expression. We must write, or speak, or act our thoughts, or they will remain in a half torpid form. Our feelings must have expression, or they will be as clouds, which, till they descend as rain, will never bring up fruit or flower. So it is with the inward feelings; expression gives them development.” Henry Ward Beecher

Overview

This unit aims to provide varied opportunities for students to perform and create dramatic works. Students will be introduced to basic elements of performance art. The emphasis in this unit is on developing communication skills and confidence. Written reflections on their own work and on the performances of others are also a part of this unit of study.

Aims

  • Communication skills through body language
  • Social co-operation, confidence and self esteem
  • Commitment and co-operation
  • Understanding styles, forms and conventions of dramatic presentations
  • Evaluate content, purpose and themes of selected drama and theatre
  • To enhance communication in a public forum to convey worthwhile messages and biblical themes

Topics Include

  • Physical movement: Interpretation of poetry/biblical characters – leading to the presentation of a Monologue performance piece
  • Comedy: The study of how body language affects humour.  An investigation of mime and clowning, Commedia dell’arte
  • Greek Theatre: The use of ONLY the body to convey emotion and character
  • Stage Combat: Learning how to fight and safely ‘fall’ in theatrical situations
  • Dalcrose: The art of graceful movement

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle for Semester 2

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Booklist Items

Assessment

  • Individual participation in class activities
  • Group participation on set class tasks
  • Performance - Monologue (solo) Ensemble (large group)
  • Written Journal Entries – including class summaries and theatre reviews

“No-one ever spoke the way this man does.” John 7:4

 

 

FOOD STUDIES: Produce and Production Elective Subject [WS Year 8]

“Look to your health; and if you have it, praise God and value it next to a good conscience; for health is the second blessing that we mortals are capable of – a blessing that money cannot buy; therefore value it, and be thankful for it.” Isaak Walton

Overview

SEMESTER 2: Students learn and appreciate the origins of their foods and different processing techniques that provide us with the range of food products that are available to us. The course explores the natural abundance of God’s provision to us and how we can include this in a balanced diet. Students discover the various stages of food production from farm to fork and deepen their understanding of the food industry as a whole. During regular practical cooking activities, students examine how foods change and respond to various cooking and processing techniques, whilst continuing to extend their recipe knowledge and organisational skills.

Aims

  • To increase confidence in the use of kitchen equipment
  • To understand and demonstrate practices to prevent food poisoning
  • To establish safe and efficient work practices in the kitchen
  • To develop an understanding of the functional and nutritional properties of food
  • To understand where our food comes from and the necessary processes to make it available and accessible to consumers
  • To understand God’s concern for our health and well being

Topics Include

  • Equipment
  • Terminology
  • Food hygiene/poisoning
  • Milk and milk products
  • Cereals
  • Fruit
  • Vegetables
  • Eggs
  • Kitchen Safety

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle for Semester 2

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Booklist Items
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Practical work and written evaluations
  • Tests
  • Assignment
  • Book work

“Then Jesus declared, “I am the bread of life. Whoever comes to me will never go hungry, and whoever believes in me will never be thirsty.” John 6:35

 

 

FOOD STUDIES: Food for Health Elective Subject [WS Year 8]

“Look to your health; and if you have it, praise God and value it next to a good conscience; for health is the second blessing that we mortals are capable of – a blessing that money cannot buy; therefore value it, and be thankful for it.” Isaak Walton

Overview

SEMESTER 1: Students explore the importance of food in our everyday living. God procides us with a body and the foods on this earth to nourish it well for optimum health, performance and service to others. We apply values of loving others in the way we prepare food for others and share the kitchen resources with fellow students. Students revise and further explore the basics of food safety and hygiene, use of kitchen equipment and cooking terminology. They continue to build on basic nutrition knowledge they have by looking at healthy eating models, why we eat and meal planning. The students participate in practical and theory classes.

Aims

  • To increase confidence in the use of kitchen equipment
  • To understand and demonstrate practices to prevent food poisoning
  • To establish safe and efficient work practices in the kitchen
  • To develop an understanding of the functional and nutritional properties of food
  • To understand how our body uses nutrients in food and guides for healthy eating
  • To understand God’s concern for our health and well being

Topics Include

  • Safety and Hygiene
  • Equipment and Terminology
  • Healthy Eating and meals
  • Nutrition

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle for Semester 1

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Booklist Items
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Practical work and written evaluations
  • Tests
  • Assignment
  • Book work

“So whether you eat or drink or whatever you do, do it all for the glory of God.” 1 Corinthians 10:31

 

 

HEALTH: Healthy Choices Elective Subject [WS Year 8]

“The world would have us believe that winning or success is measured by points on a scoreboard or by dollar signs. The Christian realises that winning or success is determined by whether or not a goal has been achieved, and that goal is to bring glory to God.” Thomas M. Boqdon

Overview

Students will examine three focus areas including safety, alcohol and smoking, and nutrition. Safety addresses physical and social safety issues that students may encounter in their daily lives. They will explore the impact alcohol and smoking can have on individuals, families and communities. Students will develop knowledge, understanding and skills to make healthy, informed food choices through a focus on the macro and micronutrients. Students are encouraged to understand the value that God places on their health and consider the impact of their choices.

Aims

  • To assist students to become informed, aware and responsible in decision making that affect their health and well-being
  • To encourage an active and healthy lifestyle, students will develop an understanding of safety, drugs and nutrition

Topics Include

  • Safety
  • Alcohol and Smoking
  • Nutrition – Macronutrients and Micronutrients

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Safety Poster (sun, water or exercise) – 20%
  • The Anti-Drug Campaign Project – 40%
  • Completion of Royal Life Saving Society e-Lifesaving Course – 15%
  • Nutrition Test – 25%

“Do you not know that in a race all the runners run, but only one gets the prize? Run in such a way as to get the prize. Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever. Therefore I do not run like someone running aimlessly; I do not fight like a boxer beating the air. No, I strike a blow to my body and make it my slave so that after I have preached to others, I myself will not be disqualified for the prize.” 1 Corinthians 9:24-27

 

 

HEALTH: Healthy Perspectives Elective Subject [WS Year 8]

“The world would have us believe that winning or success is measured by points on a scoreboard or by dollar signs. The Christian realises that winning or success is determined by whether or not a goal has been achieved, and that goal is to bring glory to God.” Thomas M. Boqdon

Overview

Students will study two focus areas including mental health and wellbeing, and relationships. Mental health and wellbeing addresses how health can be enhanced and strengthened at an individual and community level. Students develop understanding and skills to support them to establish and maintain respectful relationships. They learn about the direction and advice that God gives us in the areas of maintaining positive mental health and relationships.

Aims

  • To understand how to achieve positive mental health and wellbeing
  • To help students to develop effective communication strategies to make healthy decisions in relationships
  • To learn about how the relationships we form with others can impact on our health and wellbeing

Topics Include

  • Mental Health and Wellbeing: Anxiety and Depression; Stress; Coping Mechanisms
  • Relationships: Communication; Friendships, Family and Spiritual

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Learning Matrix

“Do you not know that in a race all the runners run, but only one gets the prize? Run in such a way as to get the prize. Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever. Therefore I do not run like someone running aimlessly; I do not fight like a boxer beating the air. No, I strike a blow to my body and make it my slave so that after I have preached to others, I myself will not be disqualified for the prize.” 1 Corinthians 9:24-27

 

 

MEDIA: Introduction to Photography Elective Subject [WS Year 8]

“God’s creative activity went far beyond the minimum requirements for getting the job done. Butterflies in the rain forest seldom seen by human eyes are creatures of breathtaking beauty. The delicate transparency of the man-of-war and the hummingbird’s wing are inimitable” Le Roy Koopman

Overview

This unit aims to introduce students to digital photography. Students will develop their photography skills in areas such as portraiture, use of Photoshop, effective visual composition in photography, telling stories through still images and using the imagery and symbolism inspired by Disney to create unique images.  By the end of this elective, students should feel comfortable using a digital SLR camera, constructing effective images and utilising editing techniques.

Aims

  • To plan, structure and design media artworks to engage specific audiences
  • To analyse effective technical elements in contemporary and past photographic images
  • To develop and refine media production skills, especially in relation to using a digital camera and editing equipment such as Photoshop
  • To develop media representations to show familiar and shared cultural values and beliefs
  • To give students a practical experience of working with others to produce a media product from pre-production through to post-production and distribution
  • To experiment with the structure and organisation of ideas, conventions and genre elements in digital photography

Topics Include

  • Learning to use a digital camera
  • Visual Composition
  • Photoshop activities
  • Photography Analysis
  • Magazine production

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle
  • This unit is offered in Semester 1 only

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Photography folio
  • Photography analysis task
  • Magazine production

"Listen to this, Job; stop and consider God's wonders”. Job 37:14

 

 

MEDIA: Introduction to Video Elective Subject [WS Year 8]

“God’s creative activity went far beyond the minimum requirements for getting the job done. Butterflies in the rain forest seldom seen by human eyes are creatures of breathtaking beauty. The delicate transparency of the man-of-war and the hummingbird’s wing are inimitable” Le Roy Koopman

Overview

This unit aims to introduce students to digital video production. Students will gain the ability to plan for and create media texts for a variety of audiences, presenting ideas and values in their productions. Students will create video productions using filmic production techniques. They will also analyse the use of these production techniques in contemporary media texts. Students will develop an understanding of how media texts are created in a variety of genres, styles, traditions and cultures.

Aims

  • To develop skills in problem solving and working collaboratively to create media products
  • To understand and follow the correct safety for using digital video equipment
  • To compare, analyse, evaluate, and interpret the content, meaning and qualities in media works created in different social, cultural and historical contexts
  • To plan, structure and design media artworks to engage specific audiences
  • To develop media representations to show familiar and shared cultural values and beliefs
  • To give students a practical experience of working with others to produce a media product from pre-production through to post-production and distribution
  • To understand and use appropriate arts language related to media productions

Topics Include

  • Camera terminology such as camera angles and movement, shot sizes and sound elements
  • Filming video productions with different camera technologies
  • Pre-production planning: including storyboarding and script writing
  • Digital Video Production
  • Film Analysis

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle
  • This unit is offered in Semester 2 only

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • 8GB USB
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Film analysis activities
  • Video skills exercise
  • Short group video production

"Listen to this, Job; stop and consider God's wonders”. Job 37:14

 

 

MUSIC: Making Music Elective Subject [WS Year 8]

“The aim and final reason of all music should be nothing else but the glory of God and the refreshment of the spirit.” Johann Sebastian Bach

Overview

Having fun making music on your own or in a group, either as a singer or an instrumentalist, and building a set of vocal skills, instrumental skills, ensemble skills, or composing skills is the main aim of this unit. This unit is suitable for both beginners and advanced musicians, and class tasks will be designed to fit around each student’s musical needs, background, strength and experience. Students will learn various rudimentary musical skills that contribute to a successful performance, such as ear training, the basic music theory, and analysis. Students also will explore various genre and style of music to help them broaden their musical taste and experience. Students will learn the rudiments of composing using such entertaining digital tools as Incredibox, Garage Band, and BandLab.

Aims

  • To make music-making fun and enjoyable experience
  • To further students’ ability to play an instrument or sing
  • To foster confidence and enjoyment in performing as a soloist or as a member of an ensemble
  • To encourage students’ continuing appreciation and participation in school Music
  • To enable students to further develop their understanding of music and how it can be used in the advancement of the Kingdom of God
  • To foster better Music Literacy

Topics Include

  • Performance
  • My Favourite Music Project
  • Theory of Music
  • Ear Training
  • Composition

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle for Semester 2

Prerequisites

  • Students must be a willing singer or an instrumentalist

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Performance, Theory, and Aural

“Praise the Lord, Praise God in his sanctuary; praise him in his mighty heavens. Praise him for his acts of power; praise him for his surpassing greatness. Praise him with the sounding of the trumpet, praise him with the harp and lyre, praise him with tambourine and dancing, praise him with the strings and flute, praise him with the clash of cymbals, praise him with resounding cymbals. Let everything that has breath praise the Lord. Praise the Lord” Psalm 150

 

 

MUSIC: Making a Band Elective Subject [WS Year 8]

“The aim and final reason of all music should be nothing else but the glory of God and the refreshment of the spirit.” Johann Sebastian Bach

Overview

This unit is designed specifically for those who enjoy playing instruments with others in a group, be it a rock band, Worship band, a Jazz ensemble, Concert band, String ensemble, or even a Percussion ensemble. Students will learn about various elements that contribute to making of a good ensemble music. Students who select this subject should be willing to play an instrument or sing. The class will play music in small groups from time to time and have opportunities to perform in and out class. Students will also study the rudiments of music that are necessary for good solo and ensemble performances.

Aims

  • To experience the fun and joy of group music-making
  • To learn to work with other people and understand the dynamics of ensemble playing
  • To foster confidence and enjoyment in performing as an instrumentalist
  • To develop the various listening skills needed for a good ensemble performance
  • To analyse the use of musical elements in the creation of music
  • To further students’ ability to play an instrument
  • To understand music is God’s gift to us and is everywhere in the universe to praise God
  • To encourage students to use their talents and abilities in their community and church

Topics Include

  • Performance
  • My Favourite Project
  • Theory of Music
  • Music Literacy
  • Listening and analysis

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle for Semester 1

Prerequisites

  • Students must be willing to play an instrument or sing

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Performance, Theory, and Aural

“Praise the Lord, Praise God in his sanctuary; praise him in his mighty heavens. Praise him for his acts of power; praise him for his surpassing greatness. Praise him with the sounding of the trumpet, praise him with the harp and lyre, praise him with tambourine and dancing, praise him with the strings and flute, praise him with the clash of cymbals, praise him with resounding cymbals. Let everything that has breath praise the Lord. Praise the Lord” Psalm 150

 

 

OUTDOOR EDUCATION: Bush Elective Subject [WS Year 8]

“The world is God’s epistle to mankind – His thoughts are flashing upon us from every direction.” Plato

Overview

Students experience first-hand God’s creation by hiking and camping out overnight. They learn about the skills involved in cooking in the bush and how to pack a back-pack and assemble a tent. Students also participate in outdoor experiences such as caving, bush survival skills, river sledding and mountain bike riding. They learn the basics of orienteering and navigation and put themselves to the test in a team enviornment on the Cardinia Reservoir Park orienteering course.

Aims

  • Students will learn more about and see parts of God’s incredible and diverse creation
  • Learn how to use and care for the bush at the same time
  • This subject should give each student some skills to be able to stay overnight in the bush.
  • Learn about mountain biking, including skills and maintenance
  • Learn the skills and safety required with caving

Topics Include

  • Hiking preparation
  • Trangia and tent preparation
  • Outdoor cooking
  • Mountain bike riding
  • Caving
  • Packing a back pack
  • Orienteering
  • Environmental care

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle for Semester 2

Prerequisites

  • Must be competent on a bike and be able to ride for an extended period of time

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Adoption of camp craft practices while on overnight camp
  • Participation during outdoor experiences
  • Bike test
  • Orienteering

The heavens declare the glory of God; and the firmament shows His handiwork. Psalm 19:1

 

 

OUTDOOR EDUCATION: Coast Elective Subject [WS Year 8]

“The world is God’s epistle to mankind – His thoughts are flashing upon us from every direction.” Plato

Overview

Students experience first-hand God’s creation by hiking and camping out overnight. They learn about the skills involved in cooking in the bush and how to pack a back-pack and put up a tent. Students also participate in outdoor experiences such as, surfing, stand up paddle boarding and kayaking. Students study a prominent Australian Adventurer in pairs and present their research to the class in the form of an oral presentation. Students learn about the basics of Geocaching as well as working in a team environment to apply what they learn.

Aims

  • Students will learn more about and see parts of God’s incredible and diverse creation
  • Learn how to use and care for the bush at the same time
  • This subject should give each student some skills to be able to stay overnight in the bush
  • Learn about Surfing, Kayaking and Stand Up Paddle Boarding and the skills that are required

Topics Include

  • Hiking preparation
  • Trangia and tent preparation
  • Kayaking
  • Environmental care
  • Surfing
  • Geocaching
  • Australian Adventurers

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle for Semester 1

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirementss

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Adoption of camp craft practices while on overnight camp
  • Participation during outdoor experiences
  • Presentation of research on an Australian Adventurer
  • Surfing project

The heavens declare the glory of God; and the firmament shows His handiwork. Psalm 19:1

 

 

OUTDOOR EDUCATION: Coast Elective Subject [WS Year 8]

“The Christian faith of the early scientists gave them more than presuppositions; it also gave them motivation. They believed that in studying nature they were discovering the wisdom and power of the Creator and were thus honouring Him.” James F. Jekel

Overview

Students will learn the importance of using good scientific techniques to collect evidence from crime scenes. They will be introduced to DNA technology and how to prepare, analyse and report the finding. Students will gain a greater appreciation of the concepts of Justice and Ethics and how they are important considerations when conduction field work. Students will learn to appreciate the need for Forensic Science in a fallen world and they can play a role in ensuring justive is administered correctly.

Aims

  • To gain an appreciation of the created universe
  • To encourage skills of enquiry, hypothesis and testing
  • To promote an interest and understanding of the knowledge and processes of science
  • To understand both the benefits and limits of scientific inquiry
  • To encourage students to consider the ways in which people have used scientific knowledge and methods to meet particular needs
  • To debate controversial scientific discoveries and applications
  • To plan, design and perform experiments
  • To further investigate the principles of the major disciplines of Science: Biology, Chemistry and Physics

Topics to be selected from

  • DNA and genetics
  • CSI: Forensic techniques
  • Historical Forensics
  • Science of Conflict
  • Ethics and Justice

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle
  • This unit is offered in Semester 2 only

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirementss

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Assignments / Project Work
  • Practical Reports
  • Oral & Visual Presentations
  • Test

“But ask the animals, and they will teach you, or the birds in the sky, and they will tell you; or speak to the earth, and it will teach you, or let the fish in the sea inform you. Which of all these does not know that the hand of the Lord has done this? In his hand is the life of every creature and the breath of all mankind.” Job 12:7-10

 

 

SCIENCE: Medical Science Elective Subject [WS Year 8]

“The Christian faith of the early scientists gave them more than presuppositions; it also gave them motivation. They believed that in studying nature they were discovering the wisdom and power of the Creator and were thus honouring Him.” James F. Jekel

Overview

Students will investigate the complexities of the human body and be introduced to techniques used in Medical Science to assess the health of a person. They will be introduced to the Germ theory of Disease and the importance of hygiene procedures. Students will use aseptic techniques to assess the effectiveness of antibiotic treatments. Throughout the unit they will investigate specific Body Systems and how they work to keep a person healthy wile examining specific case studies of disease with a focus on Thalassemia. Students will appreciate the Creator’s elegant design and the requirement for life as well as learning how to practical render help to their neighbours.

Aims

  • To gain an appreciation of the created universe
  • To encourage skills of enquiry, hypothesis and testing
  • To promote an interest and understanding of the knowledge and processes of science
  • To understand both the benefits and limits of scientific inquiry
  • To encourage students to consider the ways in which people have used scientific knowledge and methods to meet particular needs
  • To debate controversial scientific discoveries and applications
  • To plan, design and perform experiments
  • To further investigate the principles of the major disciplines of Science: Biology, Chemistry and Physics

Topics Include

  • Biochemistry of the body
  • Epidemology
  • Science and Social Justice
  • Body systems
  • Disease

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle
  • This unit is offered in Semester 1 only

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Assignments / Project Work
  • Practical Reports
  • Oral & Visual Presentations
  • Test

“But ask the animals, and they will teach you, or the birds in the sky, and they will tell you; or speak to the earth, and it will teach you, or let the fish in the sea inform you. Which of all these does not know that the hand of the Lord has done this? In his hand is the life of every creature and the breath of all mankind.” Job 12:7-10

 

 

SPORTS SCIENCE: Training Elective Subject [WS Year 8]

“The world would have us believe that winning or success is measured by points on a scoreboard or by dollar signs. The Christian realises that winning or success is determined by whether or not a goal has been achieved, and that goal is to bring glory to God.” Thomas M. Boqdon

Overview

Students examine the major fitness components required to successfully perform an activity and the factors that affect them. They will learn the various training principles and training methods and how they appropriately apply to a training program that promotes improved athlete performance. Students participate in a variety of training sessions designed to improve or maintain fitness and evaluate the effectiveness of different training methods. Through this, students learn about the value that God places on looking after their physical body. Students critique the effectiveness of the implementation of training principles and methods to meet the needs of the individual.

Aims

  • To explore the major fitness components and their importance  
  • To understand the different training principles and training methods  
  • To examine how the training principles are correctly applied to effectively improve performance 
  • To be able to analyse and evaluate individual case studies relating to effective training  
  • To create and implement a personalised physical activity program  

Topics Include

  • Fitness components 
  • Training principles 
  • Training methods 
  • Personalised physical activity programs 

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Personalised Physical Activity Case Study – 40%
  • Diary of Participation in Practical activities (including fitness components and methods) – 40%
  • Topic Tests – 20%

“Do you not know that in a race all the runners run, but only one gets the prize? Run in such a way as to get the prize. Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever. Therefore I do not run like someone running aimlessly; I do not fight like a boxer beating the air. No, I strike a blow to my body and make it my slave so that after I have preached to others, myself will not be disqualified for the prize.” 1 Corinthians 9:24-27

 

 

SPORTS SCIENCE: Coaching Elective Subject [WS Year 8]

“The world would have us believe that winning or success is measured by points on a scoreboard or by dollar signs. The Christian realises that winning or success is determined by whether or not a goal has been achieved, and that goal is to bring glory to God.” Thomas M. Boqdon

Overview

Students participate in a variety of theoretical and practical classes in order to gain a better understanding of coaching principles within sport. In this course, students will explore the fundamentals behind sports coaching and organizing sporting events. Throughout this course students will complete an AIS certificate in Community Coaching, providing a solid backbone to local coaching opportunities. Students will be able to test and apply their coaching knowledge through a number of sessions they will run with a junior year level and practice the organization skills necessary to run a junior school sporting event. After the completion of this course students will have a thorough understanding of the approaches to coaching and what it takes to organize a sporting event.

Aims

  • To complete the?AIS?Community Coaching General Principles online course? 
  • To learn and apply the knowledge and practical skills necessary to be a successful coach? 
  • To coach a junior year level through a sport unit? 
  • To organise and run sporting events within the College? 

Topics Include

  • AIS?Coaching Course (online)

Coaching essentials

  • Coaching styles: Autocratic; Democratic; Laissez-faire
  • Stages of learning?
  • Approaches to coaching: Direct based; Constraints based?
  • Skill classification: Organising and running of sporting events; Coaching junior class in a sport unit

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Completion of AIS Coaching Course (online) – 10% 
  • Coaching Session Plans (Written) – 20% 
  • Junior Coaching Sessions (Practical) – 20% 
  • Organization of Prep-Grade 2 House Athletics Carnival (Written) – 30% 
  • Running of Prep-Grade 2 House Athletics Carnival (Practical) – 20% 

“Do you not know that in a race all the runners run, but only one gets the prize? Run in such a way as to get the prize. Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever. Therefore I do not run like someone running aimlessly; I do not fight like a boxer beating the air. No, I strike a blow to my body and make it my slave so that after I have preached to others, myself will not be disqualified for the prize.” 1 Corinthians 9:24-27

 

 

TEXTILES: Reimagined Fibres Elective Subject [WS Year 8]

“In a small way human creative hands imitate this profusion of God, going beyond the minimum requirements of getting the job done. Creative hands are not content to spread on the frosting; they must make a tasteful arrangement of swirls and colour. They don’t just apply a coat of varnish; they polish the surface until it glows like satin. Creative hands do more than plant seeds; they place them in a tasteful and eye-pleasing garden arrangement.” LeRoy Koopman

Overview

This subject aims to introduce students to the knowledge, understanding and skills of using textiles for product design and art making. Students will engage in the design process as they plan and manage practical projects from conception to realisation. Students will use be introduced to equipment and materials through the development to hand sewing techniques including embroidery, measuring, cutting, pinning, applique and fabric dying. Students will use the sewing machine, as well as learn how the properties of fabric can be manipulated with industry technologies. They will use the sewing machine to design and create a textile product such as a cushion cover, tote bag or soft toy.

Students will have an opportunity to work on independent projects and also contribute to a lager collaborative class unit of work. Through collaboration, students will take on the roles within a ‘design team’ to create a class textiles project. They will engage in the design process as they learn how to effectively manage their time, apply critical and creative thinking, openly discuss roles and responsibilities and evaluate their contribution. The design of the class quilt and techniques/skills used will shine light on social justice issue and be placed on displayed within the College. Students look at the economic, environmental and social impacts of the modern textile industry through the study of ancient textile traditions such as weaving; natural dyes and cotton production. Students will analyse how these ancient textile traditions sustain the needs of third world communities, as well as how we as consumers can make wise choices to support this.

Aims

  • To develop critical and creative thinking skills throughout the design process
  • To understand the global impact that textile industry has on people and the environment
  • To explore how to use creativity to establish God’s kingdom to earth
  • To generate and create a variety of design solutions
  • Students apply project management skills to document and use project plans to manage production processes
  • They independently and safely produce effective designed solutions for an intended purpose

Topics Include

  • Design process – Sewing Machine Project
  • Impacts of Modern Textile Industry
  • Ancient Textile Traditions

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle for one semester
  • This unit is offered in both Semesters 1 and 2

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Booklist Items
  • Student choice fabric

Assessment

  • Design folio and final presentation of Sewing machine project
  • Contribution to collaborative project
  • Ancient Textile Tradition project
  • Research and Analysis

Let the favor of the Lord our God be upon us; establish the work of our hands for us - Yes, establish the work of our hands. Psalm 90:17


 

VISUAL COMMUNICATION: Logos and Promotion Elective Subject [WS Year 8]

“In a small way human creative hands imitate this profusion of God, going beyond the minimum requirements of getting the job done. Creative hands are not content to spread on the frosting; they must make a tasteful arrangement of swirls and colour. They don’t just apply a coat of varnish; they polish the surface until it glows like satin. Creative hands do more than plant seeds; they place them in a tasteful and eye-pleasing garden arrangement.” LeRoy Koopman

Overview

Students are encouraged to be confident in their individual creativity as they reflect our creative God. They research and respond to the creativity and practices of communication designers with a focus on logo and poster design. They explore and apply design elements and design principles to create their own personal visual solutions using both wet and dry media. A variety of three-dimensional paper engineering techniques are used for their poster design.

Aims

  • To develop skills in 3D construction
  • To develop design and rendering skills
  • To develop skills in using a variety of media
  • To develop skills in communicating information

Topics Include

  • Monogram using gouache
  • Paper engineering
  • Elements and Principles of Design

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle for Semester 2

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Booklist Items
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • All class work; research and developmental work, practical projects and finished designs

“Now son of man, take a clay tablet, put it in front of you and draw the city of Jerusalem on it”. Ezekiel 4:1

 

 

VISUAL COMMUNICATION: Package and Illustrate Elective Subject [WS Year 8]

“In a small way human creative hands imitate this profusion of God, going beyond the minimum requirements of getting the job done. Creative hands are not content to spread on the frosting; they must make a tasteful arrangement of swirls and colour. They don’t just apply a coat of varnish; they polish the surface until it glows like satin. Creative hands do more than plant seeds; they place them in a tasteful and eye-pleasing garden arrangement.” LeRoy Koopman

Overview

Students are encouraged to be confident in their individual creativity as a reflection of our creative God. They research the practices of designers in the marketing of products and reflect on our responsibility to develop honesty and integrity of character. They explore and apply methods, media, design elements and design principles to create and present visual communications for different purposes, audiences and in response to specific needs. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional drawing, painting methods together with design elements and principles of form, hierarchy and pattern are focused on.

Aims

  • To present creative visual solutions using a variety of methods and mediums
  • To develop design and rendering skills
  • To develop an appreciation of both technical drawing and creative design

Topics Include

  • Orthogonal drawing
  • Basic and complex forms in one point and two-point perspective
  • Cityscape in two point perspective
  • Package design

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle for Semester 1

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Booklist Items
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • All class work; research and developmental work, practical projects and finished designs

“Now son of man, take a clay tablet, put it in front of you and draw the city of Jerusalem on it”. Ezekiel 4:1