Year 9

CITY EXPERIENCE [NWS Year 9]

The City Experience Program is yet another exciting opportunity to take students beyond the classroom into the diverse environment of the City of Melbourne.

Research suggests that Year 9 is a time where practical, stimulating and real-life experiences have the biggest and most positive outcomes. The City Experience is essentially a hands-on academic program that incorporates aspects of a variety of subjects, including: English, History, Geography, Commerce, Maths, Christian Living, Physical Education and the Arts, whilst retaining a civics and citizenship focus.

As part of this program students will have the opportunity to visit:

  • The Shrine of Remembrance
  • The Melbourne Magistrates Court
  • The National Gallery
  • Melbourne City Mission
  • The MCG
  • Rod Laver Arena
  • The Aquarium
  • Urban Seed
  • The Melbourne Food Experience

City Experience will also require students to grow in the areas of group-work and the development of their negotiation skills. One of the key outcomes of the program is the fostering of confidence in our students and a healthy experience of both independence and interdependence.

Students will explore two essential questions during City Experience:

  • Why are we considered to be one of the world's most liveable cities?
  • Are we just and fair in the way we govern and treat people?

We trust that students will find the experience fun and rewarding, drawing on their new insights to help shape their education throughout Year 9 and into future years.

Students will discover that many of Australia's richest resources, opportunities and diversities are found in the city. They will develop life-long skills in cooperation through group work in a real setting. They will also benefit from learning how to navigate the city and our public transport system in a safe and efficient manner. More detailed information about the City Experience Program will be provided to students and parents.

 

 

TASMANIA TRIP [NWS Year 9]

Tasmania, an isolated island state off Australia’s south coast known for its vast, rugged wilderness areas, largely protected within parks and reserves. A wonderful opportunity for students to explore, immerse and engage with Australia’s culture, nature and landmarks.

Students arrive early at the college to be transported to Melbourne Tullamarine Airport for their flight into Launceston. On arrival, we are picked up by our coach and taken to our first destination, Cataract Gorge. A unique natural formation overlooking the South Esk River. Here students are able to walk along a pathway originally built in the 1890s along the cliff face featuring beautiful views of the river. The next stop is The Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, which is the second oldest museum in Australia. However, visiting the gallery today you wouldn't know it, the gallery's collections sit in a stunning contemporary design, sensitively integrated with the museum's heritage buildings. The last stop for the day leads the group down to Hobart at the Youth Arts and Recreation Centre. It is a great place for students to unwind and get involved in an art, music and recreation workshops after a long day of sight-seeing.

On Day 2, a drive from Hobart towards the Tasman Peninsula offers glimpses of an exciting coastline, surging ocean and early morning mist on the water while passing through sleepy fishing villages. The Tasman Peninsula is known as the home of the Port Arthur Historic Site, where the tale of convictism is interpreted in a way that transports students into another time and place in history. On this visit, students are confronted and challenged by aspects of Australia's early history. The rugged sea and coastline in the area has resulted in many shipwrecks and the area received world heritage listing because it conserves a diverse array of both natural and cultural features of outstanding global significance. Here students explore unusual rock formations like the Tessellated Pavement, Tasman Arch, Devils Kitchen and the Blowhole.

Tasmania also offers the most pristine example of temperate rainforest found in Australia and makes up one of only three remaining temperate wilderness areas in the southern hemisphere. On Day 3, the group heads to the Tahune Airwalk located in the Southern Tasmanian forest. This experience offers a range of breathtaking views of the forest up to 50 metres above the river. This opportunity will challenge students to consider the impact that we have on our nave flora and fauna, and how we can improve our stewardship of the Earth. On the drive back into Hobart we stop to visit Mount Wellington towering above the city offering amazing views of the area. Wellington Park connects Hobart's urban landscape to the bush offering extensive walks and tracks that offer the opportunity to see a diverse range of fauna, including dozens of bird species and animals including possums, platypus and echidna.

On Day 4 students head back into Melbourne and are transported from the airport back to the college. The Tasmania Camp will push students out of their comfort zones and encourage new experiences. It is our hope that we will see personal growth and the chance to make lasting memories and friendships.

 

COMMUNITY SERVICE [NWS Year 9]

The Community Service Program takes place in the last week of Term 2 and provides an opportunity for Year 9 students to be personally challenged, encourage others and to develop empathy and an understanding other people's circumstances.

By actively engaging with members of their community students develop an increased sense of social responsibility – a more global view of society and heart for helping others. They are exposed to a diversity of cultural backgrounds and apply their learning to real human needs.

Community service enables students to develop life skills and knowledge while providing a service to those who need it most. It also has a lasting, positive impact on both students and the people they have served.

Students select their week long placement from a range of organisations. In the lead up to this program students will undertake OHS as well as First Aid training to help prepare them for the environment in which they will serve.

Students are accompanied by staff to their placements, and given every opportunity to discuss progress.


 

YEAR 9 [NWS Year 9]

It is widely accepted that Year 9 is a time when students need to be re-engaged with their education and be given opportunities to learn in dynamic environments. As we have planned for 20187, we have done so with a determination to improve the way we are meeting these two key needs. We have also been motivated by the challenges that youth are facing through their immersion in a culture that encourages them to be focused on themselves and has so willingly moved away from its Christian heritage.

As followers of Jesus Christ, we believe there is a need to recapture the vision for ministry, discipleship and community service that has driven Christian for millennia to impact their generation, and indeed the world, with the message of the Gospel.

The Year 9 program at Waverley Christian College is fundamentally committed to realising the academic potential of students whilst challenging them to look beyond themselves.

In short, the central aim of our Year 9 program is to encourage students to consider their place in the world and the contribution they can make to it.

The Year 9 curriculum is divided into 2 sections – Core subjects and Elective subjects, and is designed to allow students to exercise choice and take responsibility for their decisions. Teachers recommend that students consider their elective choices in the light of:

  • personal interests
  • individual giftings and talents
  • possible career choices

At this year level, Electives are designed to give foundational skills, and to encourage interest and participation. If a student chooses to study a specialist subject in Year 10, these skills will be further developed.

Waverley Christian College has a rich extra-curricular program, with many opportunities for enrichment and engagement. We encourage all students to get involved in activities of interest to them.


 

BIBLICAL STUDIES Core Subject [NWS Year 9]

“A thorough knowledge of the Bible is worth more than a college education.” Theodore Roosevelt

Overview

In Year 9 Biblical Studies, students complete two units of work: The Life of Jesus and The Book of Acts. The course provides students with the opportunity to study the life of Jesus in depth and the development and expansion of the early church. Through both of these studies students are challenged to consider what Christian discipleship looks like and to evaluate the modern church movement in light of the teaching found in these books.

Aims

  • To help students grow in their understanding of the life and teaching of Jesus Christ
  • For students to have a working knowledge of the  Gospels and their differences
  • To continue to build the discipline of Bible reading in the life of students. Students will be required to read Luke and John during the first semester for homework
  • To evaluate the modern Christian movement in light of Jesus’ call to radical discipleship
  • To expand students understanding of the early church and the context of the New Testament letters

Topics Include

  • Semester 1: The Life of Jesus
  • Semester 2: Biblical Relationships

Time Allocation

  • 2 periods per cycle
  • Booklist items

Requirements

  • Any full translation of the Bible

Assessment

  • Bible Reading Plans
  • Research Assignments
  • Oral Presentations
  • Tests

“But in your hearts set apart Christ as Lord. Always be prepared to give an answer to everyone who asks you to give the reason for the hope that you have” 1 Peter 3:15

 

 

COMMERCE Core Subject [NWS Year 9]

“To possess money is very well; it may be a most valuable servant; to be possessed by it,  is to be possessed by a devil, and one of the meanest and worst kinds of devils.” - Tyron Edwards, 1809-1894, great grandson of Jonathan Edwards

Overview

This course focuses on some practical aspects of the legal, political, economic and business environments in Australia. It also gives students some practical experience in regard to personal financial management.

Aims

  • To help students understand their rights and responsibilities as an Australian and Global Citizen
  • To teach students to be wise stewards of the resources that God entrusts to us
  • To help students understand the political structure we are under as Australians
  • To help students understand the economic structure in Australia
  • To give students some insight into business processes and the law

Topics Include

  • Citizenship, Diversity and Identity
  • Consumer and Financial Literacy
  • The Business Environment, Business Reasoning and Interpretation
  • Resource Allocation and Making Choices
  • Government and Democracy
  • Law and Citizens
  • Enterprising Behaviours and Capabilities

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle

Requirements

  • Booklist Items

Assessment

  • Classwork
  • Tests
  • Assignment/Projects
  • Oral presentations
  • Examinations

“She considers a field and buys it; out of her earnings she plants a vineyard. She sets about her work vigorously; her arms are strong for her tasks. She sees that her trading is profitable, and her lamp does not go out at night” Proverbs 31:16-18

 

 

ENGLISH Core Subject [NWS Year 9]

“We must contemplate the import of ignoring the printed word. If you cannot read, you can do only what you are told.” Joseph P. Bean

Overview

This course focuses on developing the students’ reading, writing, listening, speaking, comprehension, grammar and critical thinking skills.  The course is structured around several topics such as short stories, poetry, fairytales, immigreation and assimilation issues and understanding differences. It is assumed that students have acquired basic reasoning skills, and provides opportunity by way of discussions, essays and persuasive oral presentations for students to formulate and support personal opinions on social issues.

Aims

  • To hone the skills of argument and debate, both written and spoken
  • To use reasoning and persuasive skills to present opinions
  • To write essays, stories and poems to express feelings and thoughts
  • To plan time and work load to complete an extended assignment by the due date
  • To recognise different types of, and purposes for, writing
  • To use the God-given gifts of creativity and discernment

Topics Include

  • Craft of writing
  • Grammar and spelling
  • Media study
  • Language devices
  • Oral presentations – formal and informal
  • Poetry and short stories
  • “Romeo and Juliet” (Shakespeare)
  • Text response
  • Text form of a memoir

Time Allocation

  • 9 periods per fortnight

Requirements

  • Booklist Items

Assessment

  • Spelling and Grammar
  • Skills Tests
  • Written Assignments
  • Oral Presentations
  • Class Participation
  • Examinations

“They read from the Book of the Law of God, making it clear and giving them meaning so that the people could understand what was being read” Nehemiah 8:8

 

 

HISTORY Core Subject [NWS Year 9]

“What are all histories but God manifesting himself, shaking down and trampling under foot whatsoever he hath not planted.” Oliver Cromwell

Overview

The focus of this course is the Modern World and Australia from 1750 to 1918.  Students explore a number of significant events from around the world during this dramatic period of change such as the Industrial Revolution, British settlement of Australia, European influence in China, the French Revolution, slavery and the First World War.

Aims

  • To engender a concept of national identity
  • To present a variety of types of historical evidence
  • To teach students to assess historical sites and artifacts
  • To develop an understanding of how the past affects the future
  • To encourage the development of a sense of responsibility for our society
  • To understand that God wants us to know history and expects us to learn from a knowledge of history

Topics Include

  • The Industrial Revolution
  • The Movement of Peoples
  • China: Colonisation and Conflict
  • The First World War
  • The Slave trade

Time Allocation

  • 4 periods per fortnight

Requirements

  • Booklist Items

Assessment

  • Essays
  • Projects and posters
  • Semester Examinations
  • Oral Reports
  • Source Analysis
  • Research & Reporting
  • PowerPoint Presentations
  • Tests and Examination

“Write on a scroll what you see and send it to the seven churches: to Ephesus, Smyrna, Pergamum, Thyatira, Sardis, Philadelphia and Laodicea.” “Write, therefore, what you have seen, what is now and what will take place later.” Revelation 1:11,19

 

 

MATHEMATICS Core Subject [NWS Year 9]

“God uses mathematics in everything He makes. He makes things in multiples of sevens, elevens, and forties. Everything that God does, He does according to mathematics: the writing of His Bible, the making of Arcturus and establishing the circuit of the earth. He imparts some of that wonderful knowledge to us that we may know something about His grace and love for us is this respect.” Asa Sparks

Overview

Mathematics incorporates skills practice, standard applications, extended problem solving, project work and testing. Students are expected to have access to and become proficient in the use of a scientific calculator. Students are generally expected to complete the coursework designated for their year level; and are encouraged to utilise their talents faithfully. However, it is recognised that there are different levels of mathematical ability. Hence, students may undertake modified work requirements in some cases in order to consolidate fundamental mathematical skills whereas other students may work on an advanced program which develops a deeper understanding of set topics and extends students to provide access to more complex applications. This will enable greater access to advanced mathematics options in senior year levels.

Aims

  • To develop students to their fullest mathematical potential according to their unique God-given talent
  • To appreciate the way in which mathematics reflects the order in God’s Creation
  • To appreciate the historical development of Mathematical concepts
  • To develop the students’ understanding of the concepts of number and space and their inter-relationship
  • To deepen the students’ awareness and understanding of mathematics as a functional tool in solving everyday problems

Topics Include

  • Number skills
  • Algebra
  • Linear equations
  • Congruence and similarity
  • Pythagoras’ theorem and trigonometry
  • Linear and non-linear graphs
  • Proportion and rates
  • Indices
  • Financial mathematics
  • Measurement
  • Probability
  • Statistics
  • Functions
  • Quadratic algebra
  • Quadratic functions

Time Allocation

  • 9 periods per cycle, streamed according to previous achievement

Requirements

  • Scientific Calculator
  • Booklist Items

Assessment

  • Assignments / Projects
  • Classwork
  • Topic Tests
  • Semester Examinations
  • Problem Solving Tasks

“He determines the number of the stars and calls them each by name” Psalm 147:4

 

 

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT Core Subject [NWS Year 9]

“All men have their frailties; and whoever looks for a friend without imperfections, will never find what he seeks. We love ourselves notwithstanding our faults, and we ought to love our friends in like manner.” - Cyrus the Great, founder of the Persian empire

Overview

Personal Development aims to equip students to deal with issues, in line with Christian values. Throughout their time in secondary school, students will be encouraged to maintain a focus on personal reflection, goal setting for growth and making a difference in the world. Personal Development provides support and a forum to discuss and process issues of importance to their age group

Aims

  • To assist students in their spiritual and emotional development
  • To promote Christian character development
  • To give a Biblical framework for various issues confronting students
  • To enable students to grow in confidence through sharing ideas in a group setting
  • To develop a biblical Christian worldview
  • To see students equipped to make a difference in their world

Topics Include

  • God’s love, boundaries and relationships
  • Sexualisation in society
  • Making a difference in our community

Time Allocation

  • 1 period per fortnight

Requirements

  • None

Assessment

  • Students are expected to be actively involved in class discussions and activities

“Teacher, which is the great commandment in the Law?” Jesus replied, “‘Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind.’ This is the first and greatest commandment. And the second is like it: ‘Love your neighbour as yourself.’ Matthew 22:36-39

 

 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION Core Subject [NWS Year 9]

“The world would have us believe that winning or success is measured by points on a scoreboard or by dollar signs. The Christian realises that winning or success is determined by whether or not a goal has been achieved, and that goal is to bring glory to God.”  Thomas M. Boqdon

Overview

Through involvement in Physical Education students will build on skills learnt in their early Secondary years.  Fitness is an integral part of the course with each lesson containing a fitness component.  The course also aims to provide students with the skill base to perform competently at interschool level.

Aims

  • To develop motor skills for successful participation in a range of activities
  • To improve their level of personal fitness
  • To develop positive attitudes towards involvement in physical activity
  • To continue involvement in physical activity throughout their life
  • To develop respect for their body as a unique gift of God’s creation
  • To interact with others in a respectful, considerate and cooperative manner
  • To increase knowledge of rules and tactics in a range of activities

Topics Include

  • Athletics
  • Badminton
  • Cross Country
  • Fitness
  • Netball
  • Soccer
  • Volleyball

Time Allocation

  • 3 periods per cycle

Other Sports and Activities

  • House Sports: Athletics, Ball Sports, Badminton, Cross Country, Swimming
  • Interschool Sports: Badminton, Basketball, Netball, Soccer, 5-a-side Soccer, Super 8’s Cricket, Tennis, Table-Tennis, Volleyball
  • Interschool Carnivals: Athletics, Cross Country, Swimming
  • WCC Activities: Aerobic Fitness, Golf, Indoor Cricket, Lawn Bowls, Self-defense, Tenpin Bowling

Requirements

  • Physical Education uniform as per College Handbook
  • A mouthguard is recommended to be used for activities that involve a higher level of physical contact
  • PE/Sport levy is charged via the College Fees for a majority of excursions

Assessment

  • Attitude and Application
  • Fitness
  • Games Performance Assessment

“Do you not know that in a race all the runners run, but only one gets the prize? Run in such a way as to get the prize. Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever. Therefore, I do not run like someone running aimlessly; I do not fight like a boxer beating the air. No, I strike a blow to my body and make it my slave so that after I have preached to others, I myself will not be disqualified for the prize.” 1 Corinthians 9:24-27

 

 

SCIENCE Core Subject [NWS Year 9]

“The Christian faith of the early scientists gave them more than presuppositions; it also gave them motivation. They believed that in studying nature they were discovering the wisdom and power of the Creator and were thus honouring Him.” - James F. Jekel

Overview

The study of Science incorporates development in theory understanding, experimental skills, investigation planning, critical thinking and problem solving. In studying body coordination and disease, students gain comprehension of biological systems and the human endeavour to resolve illness. At the end of this unit, Year 9 students implement a student designed investigation in plant antimicrobials. Through the study of electricity, chemical properties and reactions, as well as plate techtonics students understand how the chemical and physical sciences are governed by set laws.

Aims

  • To study concepts and principles important to understanding science
  • To understand and use products of technology
  • To gain some understanding of the historical development of science and technology
  • To explore the limitations of scientific knowledge
  • To develop abilities to find information from a range of sources
  • To consolidate skills in carrying out experimental work

Topics Include

  • Disease and Microbes
  • Coordination and Regulation of body systems
  • Electricity
  • Chemistry
  • Plate Tectonics
  • Extended Practical Investigations

Time Allocation

  • 8 periods per cycle

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Topic Tests
  • Practical Investigations and Written Reports
  • Student Activity Book
  • Assignments
  • Semester Examination

“But ask the animals, and they will teach you, or the birds in the sky, and they will tell you; or speak to the earth, and it will teach you, or let the fish in the sea inform you. Which of all these does not know that the hand of the Lord has done this? In his hand is the life of every creature and the breath of all mankind.” Job 12:7-10

 

 

ACTING FOR THE STAGE Elective Subject [NWS Year 9]

“In a small way human creative hands imitate this profusion of God, going beyond the minimum requirements of getting the job done. Creative hands are not content to spread on the frosting; they must make a tasteful arrangement of swirls and colour. They don’t just apply a coat of varnish; they polish the surface until it glows like satin.  Creative hands do more than plant seeds; they place them in a tasteful and eye-pleasing garden arrangement.” LeRoy Koopman

Overview

Students involved in this course will be required to perform devised and scripted drama in different forms, styles and performance spaces. This will involve developing neutral scripts, determining the story, characters, settings, style and genre for each performance. Students will develop and sustain different roles and characters for given circumstances and intentions. They will collaborate in groups to plan, direct, rehearse and refine performances.

Aims

At the end of this course students will enhance their:

  • Communication skills & Social co-operation
  • Confidence and self esteem
  • Commitment and co-operation
  • Understanding of styles, forms and conventions of dramatic presentations
  • Ability to use their experiences and concentration to effectively create different characters

Topics Include

  • Blocking – A crash course in stage movement
  • The Senses – Using experiences and sense memory to recreate expressions in performance
  • The Magic If – Using hypothesis to create a visual reality
  • Improvisation – Thinking on one’s feet in order to improve instinctual responses
  • Neutral Scripts – Determining the who, what, when where, how and why

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle for Semester 1

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Booklist Items
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Individual participation in class activities
  • Group participation on set class tasks
  • Performance - Monologue (solo) Dialogue (small group) Ensemble (large group)
  • Written One Note Workbook Entries – including class summaries and theatre reviews
  • Performance analysis

“In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth” Genesis 1:1

 

 

AERODYNAMICS Elective Subject [NWS Year 9]

“The Christian faith of the early scientists gave them more than presuppositions; it also gave them motivation. They believed that in studying nature they were discovering the wisdom and power of the Creator and were thus honouring Him.” James F. Jekel

Overview

Students undertake investigations into man-made flying vehicles and the forces that they overcome. Through understanding the forces enacting on the physical world around them and how rockets, gliders and helicopters overcome them, students gain an appreciation for the complexity of these machines. Inquiry is undertaken in student designed investigations to build their own device. Greater understanding of the laws associated with motion allow students to see the order in Creation and the hand of the Creator.

Aims

  • Enhance students understanding of forces around them and how flying machines are able to overcome these.
  • Challenge students work in circuitry, extending upon their work and projects undertaken during their core studies.
  • Develop a passion for physics and the human endeavor in developing technology.
  • Intentionally design flying machines to overcome gravity

Topics Include

  • Forces
  • Air resistance
  • Thrust
  • Torque
  • Gravity
  • Circuits
  • Student Designed Investigations

Time Allocation

  • 4 periods per cycle for Semester 1

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Dynamic Kit Rocket
  • Pressure Rocket Assignment
  • Mini-Helicopter Assignment

“But ask the animals, and they will teach you, or the birds in the sky, and they will tell you; or speak to the earth, and it will teach you, or let the fish in the sea inform you.” Job 12:7-8

 

 

CHINESE I Elective Subject [NWS Year 9]

A man who is ignorant of foreign languages is ignorant of his own. Johann Goethe

Overview

This unit is an intermediate course. It gives students an opportunity to communicate at a conversational level in Chinese and develop appropriate oral and written skills. Students will be further equipped with techniques for memorisation, communication and problem solving, which will eventually open up a realm of vocational possibilities and opportunities. This course enables students to appreciate the values and ways of life in Chinese culture. It is expected that by the completion of this unit that students will also develop a greater understanding of the multi-lingual and multi-cultural aspects of Australian society.

Students who elect to study LOTE in Semester 1 are strongly encouraged to continue with the course in Semester 2. Acceptance into Year 10 Chinese will be based on the full year of LOTE study in Year 9.

Aims

  • To introduce the students to the structure and flow of Chinese
  • To lay a foundation for further studies in French
  • To give the students a better understanding of China, their cultures, traditions and values
  • To encourage the students to develop a competence in the usage of Chinese in both their spoken and written form
  • To help the students understand the multilingual and multicultural Australian society

Topics Include

BEGINNER LEVEL STREAM

  • Clothes Items and Description
  • Shopping
  • Making Phone Calls

ADVANCED LEVEL STREAM

  • My Relatives
  • Doing Housework
  • Having Pets
  • Celebrating Birthdays

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle for Semester 1

Prerequisites

  • Year 8 LOTE Chinese

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Oral and written communication activities
  • Classroom work and activities, workbook/games/role-plays
  • Ability to respond to Chinese instructions
  • Tests and exams
  • Incursion and excursion reflections

“The Lord said, “If as one people speaking the same language they have begun to do this, then nothing they plan to do will be impossible for them. Come, let us go down and confuse their language so they will not understand each other.” That is why it was called Babel – because there the Lord confused the language of the whole world. From there the Lord scattered them over the face of the whole earth.” Genesis 11:6-7, 9

 

 

CHINESE II Elective Subject [NWS Year 9]

A man who is ignorant of foreign languages is ignorant of his own. Johann Goethe

Overview

This advanced Chinese unit is consecutive to 9LOTCHI Chinese I. It is the second part of the LOTE curriculum taught at Year 9, designed to engage and inspire the students in learning Chinese. Students cannot elect to study this subject if Semester 1 Chinese has not been completed. This second semester of LOTE challenges the learner in using Chinese in a variety of personal contexts, through the medium of speech and the written word. In this unit, students will begin to learn strategies for inter-personal communication by responding to questions, information gathering and the presentation of facts and details. Students will build upon the vocabulary and structure from previous studies in Chinese.

Aims

  • To further enhance the students’ understanding of the structure and flow of Chinese
  • To lay a foundation for further studies in Chinese
  • To give the students an understanding of China, their cultures, traditions and values
  • To encourage the students to develop a competence in the usage of Chinese in both spoken and written form
  • To help the students understand the multilingual and multicultural Australian society

Topics Include

BEGINNER LEVEL STREAM

  • Eating
  • Weather

ADVANCED LEVEL STREAM

  • Celebrating Middle-Moon Festival
  • Celebrating Spring Festival
  • Asking for Direction

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle for Semester 2

Prerequisites

  • Year 8 LOTE Chinese

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Oral and written communication activities
  • Classroom work and activities, workbook/games/role-plays
  • Ability to respond to Chinese instructions
  • Tests and exams
  • Incursion and excursion reflections

“The Lord said, “If as one people speaking the same language they have begun to do this, then nothing they plan to do will be impossible for them. Come, let us go down and confuse their language so they will not understand each other.” That is why it was called Babel – because there the Lord confused the language of the whole world. From there the Lord scattered them over the face of the whole earth.” Genesis 11:6-7, 9

 

 

CONTEMPORARY ART Elective Subject [NWS Year 9]

“For the Christian, God is the supreme artist … God looked at His creation as it progressed and saw that it was good; when He had completed it, He said it was ‘very good’… The Great Artist was evidently much pleased with His world.” Clyde S. Kilby

Overview

Year 9 Art introduces students to a new range of materials, skills and techniques.  Students explore, develop and communicate ideas and are encouraged to make creative and personal responses to specific tasks.  Through imaginative experimentation of the selected materials, students develop and refine skills in traditional and contemporary practice.  The role of the Artist in society is investigated as well as the use of visual language in the creation of artworks.

Aims

CREATING AND MAKING

  • To manipulate arts elements and principles to effectively realise student’s ideas
  • To demonstrate a level of technical competence in the use of skills, techniques and processes
  • To develop artworks which reflect personal art responses to specific tasks

EXPLORING AND RESPONDING

  • To critically analyse and interpret artworks using appropriate arts language
  • To describe the stylistic, technical, expressive and aesthetic features of artworks created by a range of artists
  • To comment on the impact of the Artist in society

Topics Include

  • Traditional and Digital Painting
  • Intaglio Printmaking
  • Current textile trends, such as weaving and silk screening.
  • Artists and their artworks in society

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle

Requirements

  • Booklist Items
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • All class work; research and developmental work, practical projects and finished artworks
  • Written work and the study of artists, history and culture

“He has made everything beautiful in its time. He has also set eternity in the human heart; yet no one can fathom what God has done from beginning to end.” Ecclesiastes 3:11

 

 

VISUAL COMMUNICATION DESIGN: Dynamic Design Elective Subject [NWS Year 9]

“God’s creative activity went far beyond the miniumum requirements for getting the job done. Butterflies in the rain forest seldom seen by human eyes are creaturs of breathtaking beauty. The delicate transparency of the man-of-war and the hummingbird’s wing are inimitable” Le Roy Koopman

Overview

Students will produce works using both digital and manual methods. Through experimentation and exploration of the relationship between design element and design elements and design principles, students develop an understanding of how design elements and principles affect the visual message and the way information and ideas are read and perceived. Students will experiment with layout design and explore the connection between the visual fundamentals. The subject also explores colour theory and its importance in design. The central focus of this unit is creative and innovative explorations of given design briefs using a variety of media, materials and presentations.

Aims

This study is designed to enable students to

  • To be able to select, combine and manipulate elements and principles of design relevant to a brief
  • Develop skills in using appropriate terminology
  • Use different presentation methods, i.e. drawing, collage and computer
  • Develop an understanding of the design process

Topics Include

  • Layout design
  • Design process
  • Vector design
  • Colour theory
  • Manual method

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle

Requirements

  • Booklist Items
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • All class work
  • Ideas, development and final presentations of digital artwork
  • Digital folio

“He has made everything beautiful in its time. He has also set eternity in the human heart; yet no one can fathom what God has done from beginning to end.” Ecclesiastes 3:11

 

 

DESIGN TECHNOLOGY: Engineering Elective Subject [NWS Year 9]

“The world is God’s epistle to mankind – His thoughts are flashing upon us from every direction.” Plato, 427-347 B.C.

Overview

Students in Engineering Design are immersed in the creative process of solving problems by identifying needs and then developing solutions. Depending on the problem, the solution may be a product, a technique, and structure, a process or a combination of multiple elements. This course is intended to stimulate students’ ingenuity, creative and critical thinking and practical skills in devising solutions to engineering design problems. Students use the engineering design process to investigate, design, plan, test, produce and evaluate solutions, Students will be challenged with problems they have not seen before, giving them practice experimenting, working through uncertainty, breaking problems down into smaller parts, taking risks and playing with their own ideas. The Engineering elective is a practical course, which provides opportunities for students to develop knowledge, understanding and skills in relation to general engineering concepts. Students will explore broad topics in systems, electrical, mechanical and software engineering.

Aims

  • Provide students with opportunities to apply maths, geometry and reasoning skills in practical, relevant and contextualised ways
  • Students will explore computational skills through coding, programming, electronics and robotics
  • Develop Technological, problem-solving and hands-on practical skills
  • To solve an engineering problem, the students would need to design parts, build them, write code and then evaluate their success. This problem solving process will allow them to be inventors of both hardware and software in creative and exciting ways
  • Explore many career fields; including engineering, science, mathematics, computer aided design (CAD) and electronics
  • CAD drawing and designing: Using the 3D printer software

Topics Include

  • Problem solving simulations - Real world scenarios
  • Computer Science - Python Programming via GROK
  • Computer Aided Design (CAD): Autodesk Fusion 360
  • Engineering Design Process
  • Inquiry Project - Co2 3D printed Dragster

Time allocations

  • 5 periods per cycle for the whole year

Pre requisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Use of technology and equipment
  • Engineering design process - logbook
  • Creative critical thinking
  • Classroom participation

The heavens declare the glory of God; and the firmament shows His handiwork. Psalm 19:1

 

 

DESIGN TECHNOLOGY: Engineering VEX Robotics Elective Subject [NWS Year 9]

“The world is God’s epistle to mankind – His thoughts are flashing upon us from every direction.” Plato, 427-347 B.C.

Overview

Course Description

Students in this course will be introduced to the field of robotics and explore how they are used in our world. The VEX Robotics Design System, combined with Robot C software, teach students how different aspects of engineering are used in the field of robotics. Students learn how to build, wire and program their robot as they explore how the hardware is entirely controlled by commands they create in software. Students will engage in solving abstract problems in computer programming activities as well as practical hands on engineering tasks. Together, these will provide opportunities for students to develop, practice and demonstrate creative and critical thinking skills in all aspects of their work.

Aims

  • Provide students with opportunities to apply maths, geometry and reasoning skills in practical, relevant and contextualised ways
  • Students will explore computational skills through coding, C+ programming, electronics and robotics
  • Develop technological, problem-solving and hands-on practical skills
  • To solve an engineering problem, the students would need to design parts, build them, write code and then evaluate their success. This problem solving process will allow them to be inventors of both hardware and software in creative and exciting ways
  • Explore many career fields; including engineering, science, mathematics, art, graphic design, computer aided design (CAD), electronics
  • CAD drawing and designing: Using Autodesk Fusion 360

Topics Include

  • C++ programming and coding
  • VEX robotics - Design and creating a robot
  • Robot Wars - Challenge
  • Engineering Challenge  

Time allocations

  • 5 periods per cycle for a whole year

Pre requisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • C+ Programming and Coding
  • Robot Design
  • Engineering Design Process
  • Robot Challenge
  • Team Collaboration

The heavens declare the glory of God; and the firmament shows His handiwork. Psalm 19:1

 

 

ELECTROMAGNETISM Elective Subject [NWS Year 9]

“The Christian faith of the early scientists gave them more than presuppositions; it also gave them motivation. They believed that in studying nature they were discovering the wisdom and power of the Creator and were thus honouring Him.” James F. Jekel

Overview

Students develop their understanding of electromagnetic waves and the practical uses of electromagnets. Throughout their work with electromagnets, students discover the relationship between electrical current and magnetic fields. Work in electromagnetic waves enables students to understand how light energy is transferred around them. Study in the interconnecting relationships of energy in the universe helps students understand the complexity of Creation and the intelligent design of the Creator.

Aims

  • Enrich students understanding of electromagnetism from core science
  • Develop students understanding experimental procedures
  • Extend Scientific numeracy skills including graphing and equations 

Topics Include

  • Electromagnets
  • Magnetic fields
  • Field lines
  • Electromagnetic waves

Time Allocation

  • 4 periods per cycle for Semester 2

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Logbook
  • Electromagnetic waves topic test

The heavens declare the glory of God; and the firmament shows His handiwork. Psalm 19:1

 

 

FRENCH I Elective Subject [NWS Year 9]

A man who is ignorant of foreign languages is ignorant of his own. Johann Goethe

Overview

This unit is an intermediate course. It gives students an opportunity to communicate at a conversational level in French and develop appropriate oral and written skills. Students will be further equipped with techniques for memorisation, communication and problem solving, which will eventually open up a realm of vocational possibilities and opportunities. This course enables students to appreciate the values and ways of life in French culture. It is expected that by the completion of this unit that students will also develop a greater understanding of the multi-lingual and multi-cultural aspects of Australian society.

Students who elect to study LOTE in Semester 1 are strongly encouraged to continue with the course in Semester 2. Acceptance into Year 10 French will be based on the full year of LOTE study in Year 9.

Aims Topics Include

  • Sur le départ – Holidays and leisure activites, making comparisons, agree an disagree, talk about what you want and are able to do, discuss which clothes to take or wear.
  • Discover the Occitaine region in France
  • En plein air – Expressing how you feel, say what you have or have not done in the past, talk about what is necessary, talk about the weather, describe your holidays, discuss outdoor activities such as treckking and camping
  • Discover the Nouvelle-Aquitaine region in France.

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle for Semester 1

Prerequisites

  • Year 8 LOTE French

Requirements

  • Booklist Items
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Oral and written communication activities
  • Classroom work and activities, workbook/games/role-plays
  • Ability to respond to French instructions
  • Weekly Spelling / Vocabulary tests.
  • Tests and exams
  • Incursion and excursion reflections

“The Lord said, “If as one people speaking the same language they have begun to do this, then nothing they plan to do will be impossible for them. Come, let us go down and confuse their language so they will not understand each other.” That is why it was called Babel – because there the Lord confused the language of the whole world. From there the Lord scattered them over the face of the whole earth.” Genesis 11:6-7, 9


 

FRENCH II Elective Subject [NWS Year 9]

A man who is ignorant of foreign languages is ignorant of his own. Johann Goethe

Overview

This advanced French unit is consecutive to LO091. It is the second part of the LOTE curriculum taught at Year 9, designed to engage and inspire the students in learning French. Students cannot elect to study this subject if Semester 1 French has not been completed. This second semester of LOTE challenges the learner in using French in a variety of personal contexts, through the medium of speech and the written word. In this unit, students will begin to learn strategies for inter-personal communication by responding to questions, information gathering and the presentation of facts and details. Students will build upon the vocabulary and structure from previous studies in French.

Aims

  • To further enhance the students’ understanding of the structure and flow of French
  • To lay a foundation for further studies in French
  • To give the students an understanding of France and francophone countries, their cultures, traditions and values
  • To encourage the students to develop a competence in the usage of French in both spoken and written form
  • To help the students understand the multilingual and multicultural Australian society

Topics Include

  • À ta santé ! Ailments and food: explain where it hurts, say what you must and must not do, choose, order and pay for food, ask for and give advice, talk about past events
  • Discover France’s south
  • Vous payez comment ? Transport and shopping: buy a train ticket, talk about transport options, buy souvenirs and talk about prices
  • Discover the French Alps

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle

Prerequisites

  • Year 8 French

Requirements

  • Booklist Items
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Oral and written communication activities
  • Classroom work and activities, workbook/games/role-plays
  • Ability to respond to French instructions
  • Weekly Spelling / Vocabulary tests.
  • Tests and exams
  • Incursion and excursion reflections

“The Lord said, “If as one people speaking the same language they have begun to do this, then nothing they plan to do will be impossible for them. Come, let us go down and confuse their language so they will not understand each other.” That is why it was called Babel – because there the Lord confused the language of the whole world. From there the Lord scattered them over the face of the whole earth.” Genesis 11:6-7, 9

 

 

GEOGRAPHY Elective Subject [NWS Year 9]

God left His fingerprints all over creation. Byron Snapp

Overview

This course provides the opportunity for students to develop an appreciation of God’s creation and the complexity of our interactions with the world. Students study the local urban environment and the geographic factors that shape our city and how it is planned. Through studying the environmental and political issues of climate change and water scarcity, students consider their responsibility as God’s stewards to care for and manage the earth so as not to pollute or destroy the environment.

Aims

  • To assist students to develop competence in Geographic skills and data analysis
  • To help students to understand their role in the management of the environment and its natural resources
  • To help students understand the complexity of our urban environment and how to make better decisions in the planning of cities
  • To evaluate the state of our planet today and in the future, and the impact of human activities on the environment and the atmosphere
  • To develop an appreciation of the importance of environmental issues in cities

Topics Include

  • Urban environments
  • Biomes and Food security
  • Geographies of interconnection

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle for semester 1

Requirements

  • None

Assessment

  • Interconnection Research Task
  • Mapping and Data Analysis
  • Biomes and Food Security Assessment Task
  • Examination

“The earth is the Lord’s, and everything in it, the world, and all who live in it”. Psalm 24:1


 

HEALTH I Elective Subject [NWS Year 9]

“The world would have us believe that winning or success is measured by points on a scoreboard or by dollar signs. The Christian realises that winning or success is determined by whether or not a goal has been achieved, and that goal is to bring glory to God.” Thomas M. Boqdon

Overview

Students will examine two focus areas including drug education and nutrition. Drug education addresses how prescription medication and illicit drugs impacts on individuals, families and communities. Students will learn how to utilise health promotion models to explore the contextual factors that influence eating habits and food choices. They will investigate nutritional requirements for healthy living and learn how to avoid nutritional imbalance. Students will further develop their understanding of God’s desire for us to make wise choices for our health.

Aims

  • To evaluate and synthesise information to take positive action for their own and others’ health and wellbeing specifically relating to drug use
  • To understand and use nutritional health information to make good food choices and avoid nutritional imbalance

Topics Include

  • Drug Education: Prescription Medication, Illicit Drugs, Effects of Drug Abuse
  • Nutrition: The Australian Guide to Healthy Eating, The Dietary Requirements for Australians, The Healthy Eating Pyramid

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy Cost – Nutrition-based Excursion

Assessment  

  • Research Task on an illicit drug – 50%
  • Nutrition Project (research, food diary analysis and presentation) – 50%

“Do you not know that in a race all the runners run, but only one gets the prize? Run in such a way as to get the prize. Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever. Therefore I do not run like someone running aimlessly; I do not fight like a boxer beating the air. No, I strike a blow to my body and make it my slave so that after I have preached to others, I myself will not be disqualified for the prize.” 1 Corinthians 9:24-27


 

HEALTH II Elective Subject [NWS Year 9]

“The world would have us believe that winning or success is measured by points on a scoreboard or by dollar signs. The Christian realises that winning or success is determined by whether or not a goal has been achieved, and that goal is to bring glory to God.” Thomas M. Boqdon

Overview

Students will study two focus areas including common diseases in Australia and health promotion. They will investigate the prevalence and impact of various conditions on the burden of disease within Australia and how these can impact them personally by examining the National Health Priority Areas (NHPAs). Students will analyse the impact attitudes and beliefs about diversity have on community connection and wellbeing. They will evaluate the outcomes of emotional responses to different situations. Furthermore, they will explore global health issues and develop an understanding of the impact these issues have on health status. Students will explore this concept from a Christian worldview looking specifically at ways in which they can be agents of change in society.

Aims

  • To understand different measures of health status, including the meaning of burden of disease, life expectancy, mortality, morbidity, incidence and prevalence
  • To discuss the NHPAs including: Key features and reasons for selection of each NHPA, Risk factors of the disease/condition
  • To explain and justify one health promotion program that addresses each NHPA
  • To plan, implement and critique strategies to enhance health, safety and wellbeing of communities
  • ·         To identify and explain some of the main global health issues and the impact they have on health status

Topics Include

  • Measures of Health Status
  • Common diseases in Australia – National Health Priority Areas (NHPAs)
  • Promoting health and wellbeing

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy cost – International Aid Incursions

Assessment

  • NHPAs Portfolio – 30%
  • Common Diseases in Australia Test – 30%
  • Promoting Health and Wellbeing Project – 40%

“Do you not know that in a race all the runners run, but only one gets the prize? Run in such a way as to get the prize. Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever. Therefore I do not run like someone running aimlessly; I do not fight like a boxer beating the air. No, I strike a blow to my body and make it my slave so that after I have preached to others, I myself will not be disqualified for the prize.” 1 Corinthians 9:24-27


 

LITERATURE Elective Subject [NWS Year 9]

“We must contemplate the import of ignoring the printed word. If you cannot read, you can do only what you are told.” Joseph P. Bean

Overview

Year 9 Literature encourages students to think creatively and to foster a love for reading and writing. Students will consider a range of texts which will be a reflection of the world around them and which will enable students to discuss and analyse the historical, social and cultural contexts of these worlds. Through close reading, students will develop and use critical thinking strategies to make meaning of the texts, and  look at the views and values of humanity that link all humankind.

Aims

  • To develop an appreciation of how texts are written
  • To develop and use critical thinking skills through analysis and creation of texts
  • To understand how the views and values of the times shape the writing of texts
  • To create a texts of their own

Topics Include

  • Graphic Novels
  • Picture Books
  • Classical Literature
  • Modern Literature

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle

Requirements

  • Booklist Items
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Writing Folio
  • Oral Presentation
  • Creative Writing Tasks
  • Analytical Tasks

“They read from the Book of the Law of God, making it clear and giving them meaning so that the people could understand what was being read” Nehemiah 8:8

 

 

MEDIA ARTS: Photography Elective Subject [NWS Year 9]

“For the Christian, God is the supremen artis. God looked at His creation as it progressed and swa that it was good; when he had completed it, He said it was ‘very good’. The Great Artist was evidently much pleased with His World” Clide S Kilby

This unit aims to further introduce students to digital photography and to begin to explore the more advanced modes of the camera. Students will understand the scope and nature of digital photography and will be able to select appropriate equipment to use, depending upon the exposure settings they require. They will explore various elements of composition so as to take more interesting photography and will further develop their understanding of camera modes and settings such as shutter speed, aperture and ISO. Students will develop their theoretical knowledge of exposure and begin to apply this knowledge to their photographic works. They will analyse the use of production techniques in professional media texts and will develop an understanding of how media texts are created in a variety of genres, styles, traditions and cultures.

Aims

  • To understand and use appropriate arts language related to media productions
  • To produce photographic works which convey appropriate ideas and values
  • To understand and follow the correct safety procedures for using digital photographic equipment
  • To create different media products for specific audiences and briefs
  • To compare, analyse, evaluate, and interpret the content, meaning and qualities in media works created in different social, cultural and historical contexts
  • To produce a media product from pre-production through to post-production
  • To develop an ability to discuss their own and others’ use of media elements, principles and/or contentions, skills, techniques, processes, equipment and technologies

Topics Include

  • Elements of Composition
  • The Exposure Trianges: Aperture, ISO and Shutter Speed
  • An Eye for Apeture
  • Nomenclature and Camera Theory

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle
  • Media Arts: Photography is only offered in one Semester. The complementary unit, Media Arts: Film is offered in the subsequent Sementer.

Requirements

  • Minimum 8GB SD Card
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Final photographic productions
  • Film analysis activities
  • Reflection on learning tasks

“He has made everything beautiful in its time. He has also set eternity in the human heart; yet no one can fathom what God has done from beginning to end.” Ecclesiastes 3:11


 

MEDIA ARTS: Film Elective Subject [NWS Year 9]

“For the Christian, God is the supremen artis. God looked at His creation as it progressed and swa that it was good; when he had completed it, He said it was ‘very good’. The Great Artist was evidently much pleased with His World” Clide S Kilby

Overview

This unit aims to further introduce students to filmmaking and to begin to explore the more advanced modes of the camera. Students will understand the scope and nature of amateur filmmaking and will be able to select appropriate equipment to use, depending upon the settings required. They will explore various elements of composition including shot size, camera angles and camera movement, integrating their existing camera knowledge to further enhance their production skills. Students will create video productions and complete several filmmaking exercises using film production techniques with an emphasis on continuity editing. They will analyse the use of production techniques in professional media texts and will develop an understanding of how media texts are created in a variety of genres, styles, traditions and cultures.

Aims

  • To understand and use appropriate arts language related to media productions
  • To produce photographic works which convey appropriate ideas and values
  • To understand and follow the correct safety procedures for using digital video equipment
  • To create different media products for specific audiences and briefs
  • To compare, analyse, evaluate, and interpret the content, meaning and qualities in media works created in different social, cultural and historical contexts
  • To produce a media product from pre-production through to post-production and distribution
  • To develop an ability to discuss their own and others’ use of media elements, principles and/or conventions, skills, techniques, processes, equipment and technologies

Topics Include

  • Video Production
  • Recording Sound and Dialogue
  • Cameral Movement, Angles and Shot Types
  • Film, Character and Genre Analysis

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle
  • Media Arts: Film is only offered in one Semester. The complementary unit, Media Arts: Photography is offered in the subsequent Semester.

Requirements

  • Minimum 8GB SD Card
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Final video productions
  • Film analysis activities
  • Reflection of learning tasks

“He has made everything beautiful in its time. He has also set eternity in the human heart; yet no one can fathom what God has done from beginning to end.” Ecclesiastes 3:11


 

MULTICULTURAL CUISINE Elective Subject [NWS Year 9]

“Look to your health; and if you have it, praise God and value it next to a good conscience; for health is the second blessing that we mortals are capable of – a blessing that money cannot buy; therefore value it, and be thankful for it.” Isaak Walton

Overview

Students study the influence that multiculturalism has had on the variety of foods we enjoy in Australia today. They explore the historical background of Indigenous Australian eating patterns and experience the cuisines of various countries of the mediterranean, Europe and Asia. Students select a country and investigate the cuisine and food, culture, then share this with the class. It broadens their awareness and appreciation for the culture of other countries and promotes Jesus’ teaching on inclusiveness and acceptance of all.

Aims

  • To develop a deeper understanding of all types of practical cookery
  • To begin practising hospitality through menu planning and preparation
  • To broaden students’ understanding of world customs and food habits
  • To understand God’s concern for our need for food

Topics Include

  • Influences on Australian cuisine
  • Indigenous foods
  • International cuisines
  • Organisation and time management
  • Calculating the cost of a recipe
  • Food preparation techniques

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle Semester 2

Requirements

  • Booklist Items
  • Suitable container to transport food
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Practical work and written evaluations
  • Bookwork
  • Assignment
  • Tests

“Everything that lives and moves will be food for you. Just as I gave you the green plants, I now give you everything”. Genesis 9:3


 

THE WORSHIP MUSICIAN Elective Subject [NWS Year 9]

“The aim and final reason of all music should be nothing else but the glory of God and the refreshment of the spirit.” Johann Sebastian Bach

Overview

The Worship Musician (Semester 1) is a dynamic course for students wanting to take their music playing to a higher level. The latest worship music is explored, with students learning how to play better in bands and in a live worship setting. Central to the course is the development of students’ individual playing style and ministry gifting. Students’ musical preferences are highly encouraged in choosing both solo and band performance pieces to be played in front of audiences. Key rehearsal techniques and performance targets are used to propel students into higher levels of technique and skill. Song writing and studio recording are also covered making this course highly relevant for students wishing to produce cutting edge Christian music.

Aims

  • To develop better instrumental/vocal skills
  • To practice playing in a worship band setting
  • To learn how to write a worship song
  • To develop digital recording skills

Topics

  • Music Performance
  • Music Genres
  • Song Writing
  • Studio Recording

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle for Semester 1

Prerequisites

  • Students must be able to sing confidently or play an instrument

Requirements

  • Estimated Levy: $50

Assessment

  • Praise and Worship performance tasks
  • Song writing project
  • Digital recording project

“Praise the Lord, Praise God in his sanctuary; praise him in his mighty heavens. Praise him for his acts of power; praise him for his surpassing greatness. Praise him with the sounding of the trumpet, praise him with the harp and lyre, praise him with tambourine and dancing, praise him with the strings and flute, praise him with the clash of cymbals, praise him with resounding cymbals. Let everything that has breath praise the Lord. Praise the Lord” Psalm 150

 

 

MUSIC EVANGELISIM Elective Subject [NWS Year 9]

“The aim and final reason of all music should be nothing else but the glory of God and the refreshment of the spirit.” Johann Sebastian Bach (1685 – 1750)

Overview

SEMESTER 2: This builds on the foundations laid in The Worship Musician , with a focus on creating and capturing memorable worship experiences. Live performance skills are further developed in band masterclasses with students curating their own worship tour at the end of the semester. Music Evangelism encourages studnets to enrichen their faith through the expression of worship on their instrument and in collaboration with other musicians. Songwriting is further explored in a tour of Planetshakers music studios (or other Christian music studio) where students get a behind the scenes look at how cutting edge Christian music is written, produced and sent out throughout the world.

Aims

  • To develop better band skills in a live worship experience
  • To create and perform in a live worship tour
  • To create and produce a Christian song
  • To interview a Christian music producer

Topics

  • Music Performance
  • Worship Music in a Band Setting
  • Song Writing
  • Studio Recording

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle for Semester 1

Prerequisites

  • Students must be able to sing confidently or play an instrument

Requirements

  • Estimated Levy

Assessment

  • Worship performance tasks
  • Worship Tour
  • Song Writing project
  • Interview with a Music Producer

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle for each Semester

Prerequisites

  • Students should be able to sing confidently or play an instrument

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Music Performance, Music Theory, Song Writing, Digital Recording

“Praise the Lord, Praise God in his sanctuary; praise him in his mighty heavens. Praise him for his acts of power; praise him for his surpassing greatness. Praise him with the sounding of the trumpet, praise him with the harp and lyre, praise him with tambourine and dancing, praise him with the strings and flute, praise him with the clash of cymbals, praise him with resounding cymbals. Let everything that has breath praise the Lord. Praise the Lord” Psalm 150

 

 

OUTDOOR EDUCATION: Bronze Elective Subject [NWS Year 9]

“The world would have us believe that winning or success is measured by points on a scoreboard or by dollar signs. The Christian realises that winning or success is determined by whether or not a goal has been achieved, and that goal is to bring glory to God.” Thomas M. Boqdon

Overview

The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award is an internationally recognized program that provides the motivation to undertake a variety of voluntary and challenging activities.  The award program has 3 levels; Bronze, Silver and Gold. Each of these three levels is comprised of four sections covering Volunteering, Skill, Adventurous Journey and Fitness. In Year 9 we will be continuing the Award at the Bronze level. Additionally, students will examine some of the ways in which humans understand and relate to God’s beautiful creation through experiences of outdoor environments.

Aims

  • To build and establish an appreciation and understanding of the skills, motivations and experience we can have in outdoor environments
  • Volunteering: To develop a sense of community service and responsibility to others
  • Skill: To encourage the development of personal interests and practical skills
  • Adventurous Journey: To encourage a spirit of adventure and discovery
  • Fitness: To encourage participation in physical recreation and improvement of performance

Bronze level requires the following minimum requirements to be met in both structured class time and additional school-based and home time, as required:

SERVICE - Minimum of  3 months

SKILL - Minimum of  3 months

ADVENTUROUS JOURNEY - 2 expeditions. Length: minimum of 2 days and 1 night

PHYSICAL RECREATION - Minimum of 3 months

One of service, skill or physical recreation must be extended for a minimum total of 6 months

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle Semester 1

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy Cost 

Assessment

  • Camp-craft skill demonstration (20%)
  • Progress of Award (20%)
  • Camp Report (40%)
  • Teamwork Written Test (10%)
  • Team Initiatives (10%)

“Do you not know that in a race all the runners run, but only one gets the prize? Run in such a way as to get the prize. Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever. Therefore I do not run like someone running aimlessly; I do not fight like a boxer beating the air. No, I strike a blow to my body and make it my slave so that after I have preached to others, I myself will not be disqualified for the prize.” 1 Corinthians 9:24-27


  •  

SPORTS SCIENCE I Elective Subject [NWS Year 9]

“The world would have us believe that winning or success is measured by points on a scoreboard or by dollar signs. The Christian realises that winning or success is determined by whether or not a goal has been achieved, and that goal is to bring glory to God.” Thomas M. Boqdon

Overview

Students will participate in a variety of activities in order to gain a very hands-on and practical knowledge of the human anatomy and the way that God intricately designed humans so that bones, muscles and joints can work together in order to provide an incredible functionality. Students will be able to identify and understand the parts that make up the musculoskeletal system. Students will also learn about the wide scale of injuries that can occur in sport and the various treatment and prevention strategies that can be utilized. Students will experience advice from current health professionals providing a solid foundation to injury prevention and treatment as well as future career opportunities within the sports industry.

Aims

  • To identify the muscles, bones and joints within the musculoskeletal system? 
  • To understand the functionality of the musculoskeletal system.? 
  • To distinguish between different injury classifications? 
  • To explore a variety of injury prevention and treatment techniques and strategies? 
  • To experience professional advice regarding health injury prevention and treatment? 

Topics Include

  • Functional Anatomy: Bones, Muscles, Joints, Movements,
  • Sports Injuries?Acute or Chronic: Incidences?of injuries in various sports and activities, Prevention, Treatment: before, during and after physical activity, Learn about health care professional’s role in injury prevention?and treatment

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods a cycle

Requirements

  • Levy Cost
  • Health Care Professionals Incursion

Assessment

  • Musculoskeletal System Quiz – 10% 
  • Musculoskeletal System Practical – 40% 
  • Sports Injury Quiz – 10% 
  • Sports Injury Treatment Practical – 40%

“Do you not know that in a race all the runners run, but only one gets the prize? Run in such a way as to get the prize. Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever. Therefore I do not run like someone running aimlessly; I do not fight like a boxer beating the air. No, I strike a blow to my body and make it my slave so that after I have preached to others, I myself will not be disqualified for the prize.” 1 Corinthians 9:24-27


 

SPORTS SCIENCE II Elective Subject [NWS Year 9]

“The world would have us believe that winning or success is measured by points on a scoreboard or by dollar signs. The Christian realises that winning or success is determined by whether or not a goal has been achieved, and that goal is to bring glory to God.” Thomas M. Boqdon

Overview

Students will explore the principles of Sports Psychology and their influence on performance, through both theoretical and practical classes. Students explore the techniques of goal setting, mental imagery and optimal arousal in preparing for sporting events. Students will investigate sociocultural factors that influence physical activity and consider opportunities and barriers to participation for various population groups and settings. Students also explore the importance of making healthy decisions and discuss strategies to encourage others to ensure that they are being good stewards of the bodies and lives that God has given them. Students will participate in a variety of games or programs aimed at increasing the inclusivity of sports to different groups within the community.

Aims

  • To understand sports psychology and its influence on performance.
  • To understand the sociocultural enablers and barriers behind a variety of factors that influence participation in physical activity with a focus on inclusivity.

Topics Include

  • Sports Psychology: Motivation, Concentration, Imagery, Arousal regulation, Sleep
  • Inclusivity in Sport - The influence the following factors have individual levels of physical activity: Family, Peers, Community, Gender, Socioeconomic status, Disability, Cultural beliefs and traditions, Indigenous culture

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle for Semester 2

Requirements

  • Levy cost – Wheeltalk and the Mind Room Incursions

Assessment 

  • Sports Psychology Test (including case study) – 50% 
  • Reflective Workbook on Participation in a Variety of Inclusive Activities – 50%

“Do you not know that in a race all the runners run, but only one gets the prize? Run in such a way as to get the prize. Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever. Therefore I do not run like someone running aimlessly; I do not fight like a boxer beating the air. No, I strike a blow to my body and make it my slave so that after I have preached to others, I myself will not be disqualified for the prize.” 1 Corinthians 9:24-27


 

STUDIO ART Elective Subject [NWS Year 9]

“For the Christian, God is the supreme artist … God looked at His creation as it progressed and saw that it was good; when He had completed it, He said it was ‘very good’… The Great Artist was evidently much pleased with His world.” Clyde S. Kilby

Overview

This unit introduces students to a range of painting, printmaking and drawing materials, skills and concepts.  These materials provide opportunities for imaginative exploration, development and communication of ideas.  Students are encouraged to make creative, innovative and personal responses to specific tasks. Through experimentation of the selected material, students develop and refine skills in painting and drawing, as well as printmaking: intaglio and stencil. The role of the Artist in society is investigated as well as the use of art elements and principles in the creation of artworks.

Aims

  • Creating and making
  • To manipulate arts elements and principles to effectively realise student’s ideas
  • To demonstrate a level of technical competence in the use of skills, techniques and processes
  • To develop artworks which reflect personal art responses to specific tasks

Exploring and responding

  • To critically analyse and interpret artworks using appropriate arts language
  • To describe the stylistic, technical, expressive and aesthetic features of artworks created by a range of artists
  • To comment on the impact of the Artist in society

Topics Include

  • Acrylic Painting
  • Printmaking
  • Experimental mixed media studies
  • Digital Art
  • Artists and their artworks in society

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle

Requirements

  • Booklist Items
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • All class work; research and developmental work, practical projects and finished artworks
  • Written work and assignments

“He has made everything beautiful in its time. He has also set eternity in the human heart; yet no one can fathom what God has done from beginning to end.” Ecclesiastes 3:11


 

STUDIO PRODUCTION Elective Subject [NWS Year 9]

“In a small way human creative hands imitate this profusion of God, going beyond the minimum requirements of getting the job done. Creative hands are not content to spread on the frosting; they must make a tasteful arrangement of swirls and colour. They don’t just apply a coat of varnish; they polish the surface until it glows like satin.  Creative hands do more than plant seeds; they place them in a tasteful and eye-pleasing garden arrangement.” LeRoy Koopman

Overview

This unit is a must for any musician who thinks they may be interested in working ‘on the other side of the mic' as a studio producer. Students will work on Apple Mac computers using software such as Garage Band, Sibelius and Logic to create digital music. The aim of this unit is to equip musicians to create, record, master and publish their own musical creations and music found in television and film. Students work of a significantly high standard will be published in various formats. Students enrolled in this unit must be willing to perform in front of others in the class and the wider student body

Aims

  • To prepare students for professional musical futures in the modern musical world.
  • To further students’ ability to play an instrument
  • To foster confidence and enjoyment in performing
  • To understand the recording process from both sides of the microphone.
  • To analyse the use of musical elements in the creation of music
  • To develop a leadership role in Music at the school
  • To become aware of the continual development in music technology and how it can be used to impact our society for the advancement of the Kingdom of God.

Topics Include

  • Introduction to the recording process
  • Performance
  • Analyse musical styles and forms
  • Theory of Music
  • Aural & Rhythm Studies

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle for Semester 2

Prerequisites

  • Must be able to sing confidently or play an instrument

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Written Analysis
  • Composition and Arrangement
  • Performance
  • Theory and Aural tests

“In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth” Genesis 1:1


 

THE ACTOR’S PROJECT Elective Subject [NWS Year 9]

“Thinking cannot be clear till it has had expression. We must write, or speak, or act our thoughts, or they will remain in a half torpid form. Our feelings must have expression, or they will be as clouds, which, till they descend as rain, will never bring up fruit or flower.So it is with the inward feelings; expression gives them development” Henry Ward Beecher

Overview

The focus in Drama is on developing clear communication skills that will enhance a student’s ability to use their dramatic talent and natural gifting in a range of settings. The opportunity to collaborate with others during the “rehearsing process” helps to consolidate group work skills. The realisation of a creative piece in the performance setting gives students an opportunity to strengthen their skills in dramatic presentation.

Aims

  • Communication skills
  • Social co-operation
  • Confidence and self esteem
  • Commitment and co-operation
  • Understanding styles, forms and conventions of dramatic presentations
  • Evaluate content, purpose and themes of selected drama and theatre
  • To enhance the use of communication in a public forum to convey worthwhile messages and biblical themes
  • Theatre ettiquete
  • Peer and Self-Evaluation

Topics Include

  • Actor-Audience Relationship
  • Communicating using Expressive and Performance Skills
  • Developing Performances
  • Improvisation for the actor’s process
  • Drama Conventions
  • Performance Styles
  • Theatre Practitioners and their application in the actor’s process
  • Documentation and self-reflection
  • Evaluating a live performance
  • Devising Drama
  • Playmaking Technques

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Individual participation in class activities
  • Group participation on set class tasks
  • Performance - solo, Duologue (small group) Ensemble (large group)
  • Written One Note Entries - including class summaries and theatre reviews
  • Performance Analysis – self, peer and professional

Let them praise his name with dancing and make music to him with timbrel and harp. Psalm 149:3


 

TURNING POINTS IN HIRSTORY Elective Subject [NWS Year 9]

“In everything that he undertook in the service of God’s temple and in obedience to the law and the commands,

he sought his God and worked wholeheartedly. And so he prospered.” 2 Chronicles 31:21

Overview

History is full of events that have shaped the World beyond human prediction and comprehension. One key aspect that has remain constant through each turning point has been the establishment of God’s kingdom to last beyond all human endeavours. Beginning with the fall of Rome and ending in World War 2, students will explore the impact of each event and how God’s presence and importance has renewed the development of the historical World.

Aims

  • To present a variety of types of historical events
  • To teach students to assess historical source documents, sites and artefacts
  • To develop an understanding of how the past affects the future
  • To understand that God wants us to know history and expects us to learn from a knowledge of history

Topics Include

  • Convicts, Gold Diggers and Australia’s first settlers
  • Democracy’s origins in Australia
  • The Movement of Peoples due to the Industrial Revolution
  • The Triangular Slave Trade
  • The Abolition of the Slave Trade
  • Rebellions and Revolutions: America and France

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle for Semester 1 & 2

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Online materials

Assessment

  • All class work; research and developmental work, practical projects and document studies
  • Written work and assignments

“He has made everything beautiful in its time. He has also set eternity in the human heart; yet no one can fathom what God has done from beginning to end.” Ecclesiastes 3:11


 

VISUAL COMMUNICATION: Digital Design Elective Subject [NWS Year 9]

“Thinking cannot be clear till it has had expression. We must write, or speak, or act our thoughts, or they will remain in a half torpid form. Our feelings must have expression, or they will be as clouds, which, till they descend as rain, will never bring up fruit or flower. So it is with the inward feelings; expression gives them development.” Henry Ward Beecher

Overview

In this unit, students develop an understanding of how to design using a digital platform. Students are introduced to the design process and how computer software can assist them in producing digital works of are and design. Students get hands-on experience and the opportunity to work to a design brief to understand the core tools and functions of Adobe Photoshop, computer aided drawing, Illustrator and InDesign. Students will be introduced and become comfortable with basig design concepts and the fundamentals of printing. After completing this course, students will know how to work effectively within the Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign applications to deliver personal creative projects.

Aims

  • To deveop skills using hand and digital graphic software with increasing competence
  • To be able to select, combine and manipulate elements and principles of design
  • To create digital works which explore and communicate themes, issue and ideas
  • Tod develop skills in printing and formatting
  • To use Visual Communication Design terminology
  • To procide personal interpretations and evaluations

Topics Include

  • Design elements and principles
  • Design process
  • Vector artwork
  • Analysis
  • Introduction to Photoshop

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle for Semester 1 and Semester 2

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Booklist Items
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • All class work - ideas, development and final presentation of digiral artwork
  • Classroom participation
  • Digital folio

“No-one ever spoke the way this man does.” John 7:4


 

WE ARE WHAT WE EATElective Subject [NWS Year 9]

“Look to your health; and if you have it, praise God and value it next to a good conscience; for health is the second blessing that we mortals are capable of – a blessing that money cannot buy; therefore value it, and be thankful for it.” Isaak Walton

Overview

‘We Are What We Eat’ involves a study of nutrition. Students investigate the role of the six major food nutrients in the body: protein, carbohydrate, dietary fibre, fats, vitamins, minerals and also water. Students will understand what influences their food choices and will learn how food labelling and marketing impacts food choices. They will discover where to find sound dietary advice and will study the impact of consuming processed foods, including sugar. This unit introduces more advanced cookery processes than previously covered in Years 7 and 8.

Aims

  • To develop a deeper understanding of all types of practical cookery
  • To understand what influences food choices
  • To understand food nutrients and their use in our body
  • To begin practising hospitality through menu planning and preparation
  • To understand God’s concern for our need for food

Topics Include

  • Why we eat and what influences our food choices
  • How food labelling and marketing influence food choice
  • Deciphering dietary advice
  • The six major food nutrients
  • The impact of consuming processed foods
  • Food preparation techniques
  • Organisation and time management

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle for Semester 1

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Booklist Items
  • Suitable container to transport food
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Practical work and written evaluations
  • Bookwork
  • Assignment
  • Tests

“Then God said, “I give you every seed bearing plant on the face of the whole earth and every tree than has fruit with seed in it. They will be yours for food.” Genesis 1:29