Year 8

BIBLICAL STUDIES Core Subject [NWS Year 8]

“A thorough knowledge of the Bible is worth more than a college education.” Theodore Roosevelt

Overview

Year 8 Biblical Studies tackles two of the most challenging parts of the Bible. The Kings & Prophets of Israel and the book of Revelation. The first study focuses on an area of the Bible that students need to understand if they are to be able to read and learn from the books that are contained within it. The second study encourages students to have a good knowledge of the text of Revelation and the first century context in which it was written.

Aims

  • To help students master the timeline and historical detail of the Kings and Prophets of Israel
  • To help students grow in their appreciation and awareness of the Biblical Prophets
  • To continue to build the students understanding of the unfolding revelation of God that climaxes in the life and death of Jesus
  • For students to read and be thoroughly versed in the text of the Book of Revelation
  • For students to be able to explain and find links between the text of Revelation and the situation of the late first century church
  • To continue to build the discipline of Bible reading in the life of the student

Topics Include

  • Semester 1: Kings and Prophets of Israel
  • Semester 2: The Book of Revelation

Time Allocation

  • 3 periods per cycle

Requirements

  • Any full translation of the Bible

Assessment

  • Bible Reading Plans
  • Research Assignments
  • Oral Presentations
  • Tests

“But in your hearts set apart Christ as Lord. Always be prepared to give an answer to everyone who asks you to give the reason for the hope that you have” 1 Peter 3:15

 

 

ENGLISH Core Subject [NWS Year 8]

“We must contemplate the import of ignoring the printed word. If you cannot read, you can do only what you are told.” Joseph P. Bean

Overview

SEMESTER 1: Students will focus on the elements of text analysis, analysing a film text to discover the purpose and meaning conveyed. Through analysing this text, students will focus on elements and construction of characters; and how characters are used to tell stories. Students will be asked to consider character traits that are biblically important as compared to those that are valued by a secular society. Students will also increase their understanding of persuasive language and be asked to critically examine advertisements and the messages that they are trying to convey. Students will engage in both writing and oral tasks that require them to utilise persuasive techniques.

SEMESTER 2: Students will examine the importance of cultural heritage and how it affects us. Through the use of an autobiography students will engage in the story telling of their own background. Students will be encouraged to examine their lineage of faith, and how their family has impacted their faith journey. Students will focus on both writing analytically and creatively, and further developing the required skills for both. Throughout the text study we will consider themes of family, forgiveness, culture and how ultimately it is Jesus that defines who we are, rather than our circumstances. Students will also have an opportunity to further explore the elements of poetry, both in reading poetic texts and creating their own poetry. Students will be encouraged to engage with the creation of poetry as a form of worship, as we examine selected biblical texts.

Aims

  • To develop the ability to appraise the content of written work
  • To teach reasoning and clear thinking skills
  • To teach the basics of presenting arguments – written and spoken
  • To develop research and reporting techniques
  • To encourage enjoyment in both reading and listening
  • To teach effective oral communication skills
  • To use the God-given gifts of creativity and discernment

Topics Include

  • Film Text: Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
  • Novels:  Chinese Cinderella, Once
  • Australian short stories and poetry
  • Written expression: essays, descriptive writing, predictions
  • Issues:  role plays opinion writing
  • Oral Presentations: Presentation of a product

Time Allocation

  • 8 periods per cycle

Requirements

  • Booklist Items

Assessment

  • Spelling and grammar
  • Reading and studying texts
  • Writing folio
  • Issues
  • Speaking and listening
  • Examinations

“They read from the Book of the Law of God, making it clear and giving them meaning so that the people could understand what was being read” Nehemiah 8:8

 

 

GEOGRAPHY Core Subject [NWS Year 8]

God left His fingerprints all over creation. Byron Snapp

Overview

There are two units of study in the Year 8 curriculum for Geography: Landforms and Landscapes and Changing nations. Landforms and Landscapes focuses on investigating geomorphology through a study of landscapes and their landforms. This unit examines the processes that shape individual landforms, the values and meanings placed on landforms and landscapes by diverse cultures, hazards associated with landscapes, and management of landscapes. Changing nations investigates the changing human geography of countries, as revealed by shifts in population distribution. The unit explores the process of urbanisation and draws on a study of a country of the Asia region to show how urbanisation changes the economies and societies of low and middle-income countries. It investigates the reasons for the high level of urban concentration in Australia, one of the distinctive features of Australia’s human geography and then examines issues related to the management and future of Australia’s urban areas.

Aims

  • To enable students to use further develop understanding and analysis of various geographic data.
  • To recognise the reliance of humans upon the natural environment and its processes and how humans change and impact the environment.
  • To understand that natural resources belong to God and we are stewards of the earth and responsible to care for it.
  • To develop students’ understanding of the concept of environment and enable them to explore the significance of landscapes to people.
  • By the end of the unit, students will have a greater understanding of the types and scales of interactions that occur between humans and natural environments.

Areas of study:

  • Landforms and landscapes, including coastal and volcanic landscapes
  • Changing nations, including urbanisation and migration
  • Analysing geographic / visual data

Time Allocation

  • 6 periods per cycle for one semester

Requirements

  • Booklist Items

Assessment

  • Coastal fieldwork report
  • Landforms and landscapes assignment
  • Changing nations task
  • Examination

“The earth is the Lord’s, and everything in it, the world, and all who live in it”. Psalm 24:1

 

 

HISTORY Core Subject [NWS Year 8]

“What are all histories but God manifesting himself, shaking down and trampling under foot whatsoever he hath not planted.” Oliver Cromwell

Overview

This course aims to develop in students an appreciation of the life and times of medieval societies by examining how medieval values, ideas, laws and the rise of Christianity have impacted the world today.  Students are encouraged to think critically and evaluate various aspects of medieval societies in both Europe and Asia, and will investigate the world of knights, castles, chivalry, Renaissance and Reformation through activities such as class discussions, model construction, projects and Internet investigations.  Depth studies include Medieval Europe and Feudal Japan

Aims

  • To describe key features of life in medieval society
  • To examine how religious beliefs and practices influenced medieval societies
  • To identify features of the Feudal system
  • To examine medieval tradition and to identify its links to the modern world
  • To identify how Renaissance ideas have impacted the modern world
  • To develop the intellectual skills of inquiry and critical thinking, and apply knowledge to develop and communicate understandings
  • To develop independent research skills in using a variety of sources, including learning technologies
  • To understand that God is sovereign and ultimately in control; no man or nation can over-rule Him

Topics Include

  • Feudal Japan
  • Medieval Europe
  • Renaissance and Reformation

Time Allocation

  • 6 periods per cycle for one semester

Requirements

  • Booklist Items

Assessment

  • Research Tasks
  • Projects and Posters
  • Models
  • Role-plays
  • Source Analysis
  • Tests & Examination

“Write on a scroll what you see and send it to the seven churches: to Ephesus, Smyrna, Pergamum, Thyatira, Sardis, Philadelphia and Laodicea.” “Write, therefore, what you have seen, what is now and what will take place later.” Revelation 1:11,19

 

 

LOTE: Chinese Core Subject [NWS Year 8]

A man who is ignorant of foreign languages is ignorant of his own. Johann Goethe

Overview

The Chinese Program promotes awareness of the culture of China and the multi-cultural nature of Australia. It is a sequential program, which fosters a student’s ability to communicate in speech and writing, as well as developing effective listening and reading skills in the Chinese language.

For Beginner Level stream, they learn favourite sports, description of a friend, food and drinks, birthday and daily routines.

For Advanced Level stream, they learn making phone to friends, describing school, school subjects, personal hobbies and shopping.

Aims

  • To introduce the students to the structure and flow of Chinese
  • To lay a foundation for further studies in Chinese
  • To give the students an understanding of China, its culture, traditions and values
  • To encourage students to develop a competence in the usage of Chinese in both spoken and written form
  • To help the student understand the multilingual and multicultural Australian society

Topics Include

BEGINNER LEVEL STREAM

  • Sports and activities
  • At school
  • Food and shopping
  • Dates and birthdays
  • House Plan and Location

ADVANCED LEVEL STREAM

  • Making Phone Calls
  • My New School
  • I Like Learning Chinese
  • My Hobbies
  • School Subjects
  • Buying Stationary
  • Buying Gift

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle

Requirements

  • Booklist Items
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Participation in communication activities (oral)
  • Completion of set tasks
  • Participation in classroom activities
  • Ability to understand and follow instructions
  • Examination

“The Lord said, “If as one people speaking the same language they have begun to do this, then nothing they plan to do will be impossible for them. Come, let us go down and confuse their language so they will not understand each other.” That is why it was called Babel – because there the Lord confused the language of the whole world. From there the Lord scattered them over the face of the whole earth.” Genesis 11:6-7, 9


 

LOTE: French Core Subject [NWS Year 8]

A man who is ignorant of foreign languages is ignorant of his own. Johann Goethe

Overview

Students understand that language originates from God, by studying French they gain insight into the world that God has given us and that he has commanded us to care for. Students continue to use written and spoken French to interact with teachers, peers and others and exchange experiences, opinions and views. They use strategies such as emphasis, repetition and summary to support fluency and expression in performances and discussions. They plan, draft and present imaginative and informative texts, using simple and compound sentences. Students use regular (-er) verbs in the Present Tense form independently as well as high-frequency irregular verbs (être & avoir). They can use verbs in affirmative and negative forms. Students begin to make appropriate language choices when communicating, in various contexts, in French.

Aims

  • To introduce the students to the structure and flow of French
  • To lay a foundation for further studies in French
  • To give the students an understanding of France, its culture, traditions and values
  • To encourage students to develop a competence in the usage of French in both spoken and written form
  • To help the student understand the multilingual and multicultural Australian society

Topics Include

  • Chez toi – The house
  • La vie scolaire – School life
  • Bon Weekend - Pastimes and leisure activities
  • Allons en ville - Directions and locations

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle

Requirements

  • Booklist Items
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Participation in communication activities (oral)
  • Completion of set tasks
  • Participation in classroom activities
  • Weekly Spelling / Vocabulary tests.
  • Topic Tests
  • Ability to understand and follow instructions
  • Examination

“The Lord said, “If as one people speaking the same language they have begun to do this, then nothing they plan to do will be impossible for them. Come, let us go down and confuse their language so they will not understand each other.” That is why it was called Babel – because there the Lord confused the language of the whole world. From there the Lord scattered them over the face of the whole earth.” Genesis 11:6-7, 9

 

 

MATHEMATICS Core Subject [NWS Year 8]

“God uses mathematics in everything He makes. He makes things in multiples of sevens, elevens, and forties. Everything that God does, He does according to mathematics: the writing of His Bible, the making of Arcturus and establishing the circuit of the earth. He imparts some of that wonderful knowledge to us that we may know something about His grace and love for us is this respect.” Asa Sparks

Overview

Mathematics incorporates skills practice, standard applications, problem solving, project work and testing. Students are generally expected to complete the coursework designated for their year level; however, although students should utilise their talents faithfully, they have been given different levels of gifting by God. Hence, students may undertake modified work requirements in some cases in order to consolidate fundamental mathematical skills whereas other students may work on an advanced program which develops a deeper understanding of set topics and extends students to provide access to more complex applications, enabling greater access to advanced mathematics options in senior year levels.

Aims

  • To develop students to their fullest mathematical potential according to their unique God-given talent
  • To appreciate the way in which mathematics reflects the order in God’s Creation
  • To appreciate the historical development of Mathematical concepts
  • To develop the students’ understanding of the concepts of number and space and their inter-relationship
  • To deepen the students’ awareness and understanding of mathematics as a functional tool in solving everyday problems

Topics Include

  • Integers
  • Index laws
  • Real numbers
  • Ratios and rates
  • Application of percentages
  • Congruence and transformations
  • Algebra
  • Measurement
  • Linear equations
  • Representing and interpreting data
  • Probability
  • Coordinates and linear graphs
  • Pythagoras’ theorem

Time Allocation

  • 8 periods per cycle, streamed according to previous achievement

Requirements

  • Scientific Calculator
  • Booklist Items

Assessment

  • Assignments / Projects
  • Classwork
  • Topic Tests
  • Semester Examinations
  • Problem Solving Tasks

“He determines the number of the stars and calls them each by name” Psalm 147:4

 

 

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT Core Subject [NWS Year 8]

“All men have their frailties; and whoever looks for a friend without imperfections, will never find what he seeks. We love ourselves notwithstanding our faults, and we ought to love our friends in like manner.” - Cyrus the Great, founder of the Persian empire

Overview

Personal Development aims to equip students to deal with issues, in line with Christian values. Throughout their time in secondary school, students will be encouraged to maintain a focus on personal reflection, goal setting for growth and making a difference in the world. Personal Development provides support and a forum to discuss and process issues of importance to their age group.

Aims

  • To assist students in their spiritual and emotional development
  • To promote Christian character development
  • To give a Biblical framework for various issues confronting students
  • To enable students to grow in confidence through sharing ideas in a group setting
  • To develop a biblical Christian worldview
  • To see students equipped to make a difference in their world

Topics Include

Throughout the year the following topics will be covered:

  • Goal Setting
  • Cyber Safety
  • Grief
  • Peer Pressure
  • Resiliency
  • Community Service
  • Body Image
  • Addiction

Time Allocation

  • 2 periods per cycle

Assessment

  • Students are expected to be actively involved in class discussions and activities
  • Community Service

“Teacher, which is the great commandment in the Law?” Jesus replied, “‘Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind.’ This is the first and greatest commandment. And the second is like it: ‘Love your neighbour as yourself.’ Matthew 22:36-39

 

 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION Core Subject[NWS Year 8]

“The world would have us believe that winning or success is measured by points on a scoreboard or by dollar signs. The Christian realises that winning or success is determined by whether or not a goal has been achieved, and that goal is to bring glory to God.”  Thomas M. Boqdon

Overview

Students investigate a number of different strategies using a ‘game sense’ approach, where the focus is not only on technical proficiency, but a greater emphasis is placed on the development of tactics and decision-making. Students will explore a range of activities that will enhance the development of previously learnt skills, improve physical fitness and promote a healthy lifestyle. Through involvement in the small-sided games, students develop a Christian perspective towards competition with a view to promoting sportsmanship and cooperation

Aims

  • To improve skill level under competitive pressure
  • To improve transfer of skills across games
  • To improve decision-making
  • To improve use of space in games
  • To develop teamwork and cooperation
  • To develop leadership skills
  • To maximize participation
  • To increase fun, enjoyment and motivation

Topics Include

  • Australian Rules Football
  • Cricket
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Fitness
  • International Sports
  • Touch Rugby

Time Allocation

  • 3 periods per cycle

Other Sports and Activities

  • House Sports: Athletics, Ball Sports, Badminton, Cross Country, Swimming
  • Interschool Sports: Badminton, Basketball, Netball, Soccer, 5-a-side Soccer, Super 8’s Cricket, Tennis, Table-Tennis, Volleyball
  • Interschool Carnivals: Athletics, Cross Country, Swimming
  • WCC Activities: Aerobic Fitness, Golf, Indoor Cricket, Lawn Bowls, Self-defence

Requirements

  • Physical Education uniform as per College requirements
  • A mouth guard is recommended to be used for activities that involve a higher level of physical contact
  • Sport levy is charged via the College Fees for Interschool Sport and activities

Assessment

  • Attitude and Effort
  • Game-Sense Rubrics
  • Fitness level against Age and Gender norms

“Do you not know that in a race all the runners run, but only one gets the prize? Run in such a way as to get the prize. Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever. Therefore, I do not run like someone running aimlessly; I do not fight like a boxer beating the air. No, I strike a blow to my body and make it my slave so that after I have preached to others, I myself will not be disqualified for the prize.” 1 Corinthians 9:24-27

 

 

SCIENCE Core Subject[NWS Year 8]

“The Christian faith of the early scientists gave them more than presuppositions; it also gave them motivation. They believed that in studying nature they were discovering the wisdom and power of the Creator and were thus honouring Him.” James F. Jekel

Overview

Science seeks to develop the students’ abilities to ask questions and to find answers about aspects of God’s Creation. The laws which govern Creation have many applications in our daily lives. Students will practically investigate, verify and apply these laws and shall identify and resolve, where possible, the problems associated with our physical world which have occurred as a result of the fallen state of humanity. Consequently, students are reminded of the moral responsibility of God’s children to serve Him faithfully as stewards of the resources and the materials which He has made available to us. A range of career-based and domestic applications of the study of science will be covered to better equip students to serve God with greater understanding.

Aims

  • To retain awe and wonder when contemplating God’s marvellous Creation
  • To foster and develop curiosity about all aspects of the earth and the universe
  • To emphasise both the potential of science as well as its limits
  • To help students co-discover many facts, laws and principles that have been previously discovered by earlier investigators of nature and the cosmos
  • To increase students’ powers of observation
  • To develop abilities to design and carry out experiments and analyse the resultant data
  • To develop abilities to evaluate evidence and solve problems

Topics Include

  • Body Systems
  • Cells and Microscopes
  • Atomic Theory and Chemistry
  • Energy
  • Geology
  • Reproduction
  • Experimental Research
  • Practical Investigations

Time Allocation

  • 6 periods per cycle

Requirements

  • Booklist Items

Assessment

  • Topic Unit Tests
  • Assignments
  • Notebooks
  • Practical Investigation and Reports
  • Semester Examinations
  • Homework

“But ask the animals, and they will teach you, or the birds in the sky, and they will tell you; or speak to the earth, and it will teach you, or let the fish in the sea inform you. Which of all these does not know that the hand of the Lord has done this? In his hand is the life of every creature and the breath of all mankind.” Job 12:7-10

 

 

ACTING ACADEMY Elective Subject[NWS Year 8]

“In a small way human creative hands imitate this profusion of God, going beyond the minimum requirements of getting the job done. Creative hands are not content to spread on the frosting; they must make a tasteful arrangement of swirls and colour. They don’t just apply a coat of varnish; they polish the surface until it glows like satin.  Creative hands do more than plant seeds; they place them in a tasteful and eye-pleasing garden arrangement.” LeRoy Koopman

Overview

This unit aims to provide varied opportunities for students to perform and create dramatic works. Students will be introduced to basic elements of performance art. The emphasis in this unit is on developing communication skills and confidence. Written reflections on their own work and on the performances of others are also a part of this unit of study.

Aims

  • Communication skills through body language
  • Social co-operation, confidence and self esteem
  • Commitment and co-operation
  • Understanding styles, forms and conventions of dramatic presentations
  • Evaluate content, purpose and themes of selected drama and theatre
  • Audience engagement through meaningful content and biblical themes

Topics Include

  • Drama Terminology: Key Concepts, Tools & Devices
  • Non-Naturalism and Non-Naturalistic Theatre
  • A Study in Physical Theatre

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle for Semester 2

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Individual participation in class activities
  • Group participation on set class tasks
  • Performance - Monologue (solo) Ensemble (large group)
  • Written entries – including class summaries and theatre reviews
  • One Note and work book

“In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth” Genesis 1:1

 

 

ACTING SKILLS Elective Subject[NWS Year 8]

“No work of art is more important than the Christian’s own life, and every Christian is called upon to be an artist in this sense. He may have no gift of creativity in terms of the way he lives his life. In this sense, the Christian life is to be a thing of truth and also a thing of beauty in the midst of a lost and despairing world.” Frances A Schaeffer

Overview

This unit aims to provide varied opportunities for students to perform and create dramatic works. Students will be introduced to the basic elements of the art of performance. The emphasis in this unit is on developing communication, confidence, commitment and cooperation.

Aims

By the completion of this unit students will have enhanced

  • Communication skills & social co-operation
  • Confidence and self esteem
  • Commitment and co-operation
  • Ability to project their voice
  • Stage presence
  • To build confidence to stand alone or work with others
  • To learn the art of storytelling and how good stories can impact lives for positive change
  • To develop flexible thinking, creative thinking and problem solving
  • To build the skill of empathy for others through role play
  • To participate as a valued member of a group
  • To extend experience and methods of presentation of thoughts and feelings
  • To develop the ability to think quickly and act appropriately during improvisations
  • To develop listening skills
  • To develop the ability to follow specific instructions
  • To understand the ability to speak, is given to us by God. He will guide our choice of words and the organisation of what we say, as we permit Him to do so
  • Improvisational skills

Topics Include

  • Stage Presence – the ability to draw an audience and use your body to express most effectively what it is you are trying to communicate, as well as increase the effectiveness other performers on stage
  • Projection – the ability to perform in a number of different situations and by heard and understood by the audience
  • Improvisation – The ability to think on one’s feet, especially in performance scenarios, to the effect of increasing the actor’s instincts
  • Group Interactions – The skill of responding, giving place to, and enhancing scenes with other actors on stage, knowing when to fall to the background or take centre stage and everything in between

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle for Semester 1

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Individual participation in class activities
  • Group participation on set class tasks
  • Performance - Monologue (solo) Ensemble (large group)
  • One Note and work book

Let them praise his name with dancing and make music to him with timbrel and harp. Psalm 149:3

 

 

ART I Elective Subject[NWS Year 8]

“For the Christian, God is the supreme artist … God looked at His creation as it progressed and saw that it was good; when He had completed it, He said it was ‘very good’… The Great Artist was evidently much pleased with His world.” 

Clyde S. Kilby, Christianity and Aesthetics

Overview

Art introduces students to a range of materials, skills and techniques. Art provides opportunities for imaginative exploration, development and communication of ideas. Students are encouraged to make creative and personal responses to specific tasks. Through experimentation of the selected material, students develop and refine skills in drawing and mixed media.

Aims

CREATING AND MAKING

  • To manipulate arts elements and principles effectively on scraperboard, paper and fabric
  • To demonstrate a level of technical competence in the use of drawing skills, techniques and printing processes
  • To develop pastel artworks which reflect personal art responses to specific tasks
  • Exploring and responding
  • To research and critically analyse and interpret artworks using appropriate arts language
  • To describe the stylistic, technical, expressive and aesthetic features of artworks

Topics Include

  • Sculpture
  • Painting
  • Mixed Media Drawing

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle for Semester 1

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Booklist Items
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • All class work; research and developmental work, practical projects and finished artworks
  • Written work and assignments

“He has made everything beautiful in its time. He has also set eternity in the human heart; yetno one can fathom what God has done from beginning to end.” Ecclesiastes 3:11

 

 

ART II Elective Subject[NWS Year 8]

“For the Christian, God is the supreme artist … God looked at His creation as it progressed and saw that it was good; when He had completed it, He said it was ‘very good’… The Great Artist was evidently much pleased with His world.” 

Clyde S. Kilby, Christianity and Aesthetics

Overview

Art introduces students to a range of materials, skills and techniques.  Art provides opportunities for imaginative exploration, development and communication of ideas.  Students are encouraged to make creative and personal responses to specific tasks.  Through experimentation of the selected material, students develop and refine skills in drawing and mixed media.

Aims

CREATING AND MAKING

  • To manipulate arts elements and principles effectively
  • To demonstrate a level of technical competence in the use of skills, techniques and processes – drawing, painting and photography
  • To develop artworks which reflect personal art responses to specific tasks
  • Exploring and responding
  • To research and critically analyse and interpret artworks using appropriate arts language

Topics Include

  • Drawing: contour, tone
  • Sculpture
  • Watercolour and Acrylic Painting

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle for Semester 2

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Booklist Items
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • All class work; research and developmental work, practical projects and finished artworks
  • Written work and assignments

“He has made everything beautiful in its time. He has also set eternity in the human heart; yetno one can fathom what God has done from beginning to end.” Ecclesiastes 3:11

 

 

DESIGN TECHNOLOGY: Engineering Elective Subject[NWS Year 8]

“The world is God’s epistle to mankind – His thoughts are flashing upon us from every direction.” Plato, 427-347 B.C.

Overview

Students in Engineering Design are immersed in the creative process of solving problems by identifying needs and developing solutions. Depending on the problem, the solution may be a product, technique, structure, a process or a combination of multiple elements. This course is intended to stimulate students’ ingenuity, creative and critical thinking and practical skills in devising solutions to engineering design problems. Students use the challenged with problems they have not seen before, giving them practice experimenting, working through uncertainty, breaking problems down into small parts, taking risks and playing with their own ideas. The Engineering elective is a practical course, which provides opportunities for students to develop knowledge, understanding and skills in relation to general engineering concepts. Students will explore broad topics in Systems, Electrical, Mechanical and Software engineering.

Aims

  • Provide students with opportunities to apply maths, geometry and reasoning skills in practical, relevant and contextualised ways
  • Students will explore computational skills through coding, programming and electronics
  • Develop Technological, problem-solving and hands-on practical skills
  • To solve an engineering problem, the students would need to design parts, build them, write code and then evaluate their success. This problem solving process will allow them to be inventors of both hardware and software in creative and exciting ways
  • Explore many career fields; including engineering, science, mathematics, computer aided design (CAD) and electronics
  • CAD drawing and designing: Using Autodesk Fusion 360

Topics Include

  • Soldering - Simon Says Kit / Electronic Kit
  • Computer Science - Python Program
  • Computer Aided Design (CAD): Autodesk Fusion 360
  • Engineering Design Process
  • Inquiry Project - Bridge design and production

Time allocation

  • 4 periods for the whole year

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Use of technology and equipment
  • Engineering design process - logbook
  • Creative and critical thinking
  • Classroom participation

The heavens declare the glory of God; and the firmament shows His handiwork. Psalm 19:1

 

 

DESIGN TECHNOLOGY: Engineering VEX Robotics Elective Subject[NWS Year 8]

“The world is God’s epistle to mankind – His thoughts are flashing upon us from every direction.” Plato, 427-347 B.C.

Overview

Students in this course will be introduced to the field of robotics and explore how they are used in our world. The VEX Robotics Design System, combined with Robot C software, teach students how different aspects of engineering are used in the field of robotics. Students learn how to build, wire and program their robot as they explore how the hardware is entirely controlled by commands they create in software. Students will engage in solving abstract problems in computer programming acticities as well as practical hands on engineering tasks. Together, these will provide opportunities for students to develop, practice and demonstrate creative and critical thinking skills in all aspects of their work.

Aims

  • Provide students with opportunities to apply maths, geometry and reasoning skills in practical, relevant and contextualised ways
  • Students will explore computational skills through coding, C+ programming, electronics and robotics
  • Develop Technological, problem-solving and hands-on practical skills
  • To solve an engineering problem, the students would need to design parts, build them, write code and then evaluate their success. This problem solving process will allow them to be inventors of both hardware and software in creative and exciting ways
  • Explore many career fields; including engineering, science, mathematics, art, graphic design, computer aided design (CAD), electronics
  • CAS drawing and designing: Using Autodesk Fusion 360

Topics Include

  • C++ programming and coding
  • VEX robotics - Design and creating a robot
  • Robot Wars - Challenge
  • Engineering Challenge  

Time allocations

  • 5 periods per cycle for a whole year

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • C+ Programming and Coding
  • Robot Design
  • Engineering Design Process
  • Robot Challenge
  • Team Collaboration

The heavens declare the glory of God; and the firmament shows His handiwork. Psalm 19:1


 

HEALTH I Elective Subject[NWS Year 8]

“The world would have us believe that winning or success is measured by points on a scoreboard or by dollar signs. The Christian realises that winning or success is determined by whether or not a goal has been achieved, and that goal is to bring glory to God.” Thomas M. Boqdon

Overview

Students will examine three focus areas including safety, alcohol and smoking, and nutrition. Safety addresses physical and social safety issues that students may encounter in their daily lives. They will explore the impact alcohol and smoking can have on individuals, families and communities. Students will develop knowledge, understanding and skills to make healthy, informed food choices through a focus on the macro and micronutrients. Students are encouraged to understand the value that God places on their health and consider the impact of their choices.

Aims

  • To assist students to become informed, aware and responsible in decision making that affect their health and wellbeing
  • To encourage an active and healthy lifestyle where students will develop an understanding of safety, alcohol, smoking and nutrition

Topics Include

  • Safety
  • Alcohol and Smoking
  • Nutrition – Macronutrients and Micronutrients

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy cost – Surf Safety Excursion

Assessment

  • Safety Poster (sun, water or exercise) – 20%
  • Dangers of Alcohol and Smoking Assignment – 40%
  • Completion of Royal Life Saving Society e-Lifesaving Course – 15%
  • Nutrition Test – 25%

“Do you not know that in a race all the runners run, but only one gets the prize? Run in such a way as to get the prize. Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever. Therefore I do not run like someone running aimlessly; I do not fight like a boxer beating the air. No, I strike a blow to my body and make it my slave so that after I have preached to others, I myself will not be disqualified for the prize.”

1 Corinthians 9:24-27


 

HEALTH II Elective Subject[NWS Year 8]

“The world would have us believe that winning or success is measured by points on a scoreboard or by dollar signs. The Christian realises that winning or success is determined by whether or not a goal has been achieved, and that goal is to bring glory to God.” Thomas M. Boqdon

Overview

Students will study two focus areas including mental health and wellbeing, and relationships. Mental health and wellbeing addresses how health can be enhanced and strengthened at an individual and community level. Students develop understanding and skills to support them to establish and maintain respectful relationships. They learn about the direction and advice that God gives us in the areas of maintaining positive mental health and relationships.

Aims

  • To understand how to achieve positive mental health and wellbeing
  • To help students to develop effective communication strategies to make healthy decisions in relationships
  • To learn about how the relationships we form with others can impact on our health and wellbeing

Topics Include

  • Mental Health and Wellbeing: Anxiety and Depression, Stress, Coping Mechanisms
  • Relationships: Communication, Friendships, Family and Spiritual

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy cost – Rock Climbing Excursion ($30)

Assessment

  • Learning Matrix

“Do you not know that in a race all the runners run, but only one gets the prize? Run in such a way as to get the prize. Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever. Therefore I do not run like someone running aimlessly; I do not fight like a boxer beating the air. No, I strike a blow to my body and make it my slave so that after I have preached to others, I myself will not be disqualified for the prize.” 1 Corinthians 9:24-27


 

MEDIA ARTS Elective Subject[NWS Year 8]

“Thinking cannot be clear till it has had expression. We must write, or speak, or act our thoughts, or they will remain in a half torpid form. Our feelings must have expression, or they will be as clouds, which, till they descend as rain, will never bring up fruit or flower. So it is with the inward feelings; expression gives them development.” Henry Ward Beecher

Overview

In this unit, students will be analysing how films are developed and created; from the planning stages through to final production. The focus of this unit will centre around the development of the Disney Pixar group, through a study of their short films and subsequent development of animation techniques. Students will gain the ability to create media texts for a variety of audiences, presenting ideas and values in their productions. Students will be introduced to the basics of digital photography including composition and exposure and will learn to communicate story through a series of images. Students will have the opportunity to create their own media products, including short introductory video productions and will begin to develop a digital folio consisting of media products in their various forms. This unit is designed to introduce students to Media terminology and skills required for further Media studies in subsequent years.

Aims

  • To understand and use appropriate arts language related to media productions
  • To produce photographic work which convey appropriate ideas and values
  • To develop skills in problem solving and working collaboratively to create media products
  • To understand and follow the correct safety procedures for using digital photographic/video equipment
  • To begin to compare, analyse, evaluate and interpret the content, meaning and qualities in media works created in different social, cultural and historical contexts
  • To give students a practical experience of working with others to produce a media product from pre-production through to post-production and distribution
  • To develop an ability to discuss their own and others’ use of media elements, principles and/or conventions, skills, genres, techniques, processes, equipment and technologies

Topics include

  • Digital Photography
  • Video Production
  • Film Analysis
  • The Development of Animation

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle
  • This unit is offered in both Semester 1 and 2

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Minimum 8GB SD card
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Film analysis / Commentary tasks
  • Camera Techniques Project
  • Filmmaking Exercises
  • Stop Motion Animation
  • Major Production

“He has made everything beautiful in its time. He has also set eternity in the human heart; yetno one can fathom what God has done from beginning to end.” Ecclesiastes 3:11

 

 

MUSIC MINISTRY Elective Subject[NWS Year 8]

“The aim and final reason of all music should be nothing else but the glory of God and the refreshment of the spirit.”

Johann Sebastian Bach

Overview

SEMESTER 1

Music Ministry is an exciting subject for students who enjoy playing/sinigng in a band and would like to learn more about music ministry. Students may opt in for both Semester 1 and Semester 2, or one semester only The Year 8 Music Ministry course trains students in how to rehearse, set up and run a live worship event, with an emphasis on nurturing a daily devotional life and strong music practice habits. Involvement in the College Chapel team works well alongside this course and is strongly encouraged.

SEMESTER 2

The Music Ministry Semester 2 elective builds on foundations set in Semester 1. Students continue to develop their instrumental skills in a live band setting, further developing their ability to plan and outwork a music ministry tour in the local community. Aspects of reading and understanding God’s word and how it applies to everyday life are also explored.

Aims

  • To learn how to play and sing in a worship band
  • To learn how to plan and put on a worship event
  • To cultivate a devotional life
  • To foster greater understandings of the worship music genre

Topics Include

  • Worship Music Appreciation
  • Planning a Worship Tour
  • Cultivating a Devotional Life
  • Playing in a Band
  • Putting on a Worship Tour
  • Cultivating a Devotional Life
  • Playing in a Band
  • Study of a Worship Music Producer

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per Semester

Prerequisites

  • The ability to play an instrument or sing

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Worship Artist Project
  • Planning a Worship Tour Project
  • Devotional/Practice Journal
  • Performance on instrument/voice in a band setting

“Praise the Lord, Praise God in his sanctuary; praise him in his mighty heavens. Praise him for his acts of power; praise him for his surpassing greatness. Praise him with the sounding of the trumpet, praise him with the harp and lyre, praise him with tambourine and dancing, praise him with the strings and flute, praise him with the clash of cymbals, praise him with resounding cymbals. Let everything that has breath praise the Lord. Praise the Lord” Psalm 150

 

 

MUSIC 8.0 & 8.1 Elective Subject[NWS Year 8]

“The aim and final reason of all music should be nothing else but the glory of God and the refreshment of the spirit.”

Johann Sebastian Bach

Overview

SEMESTER 1 (8.0)

This course is designed for students who have studied an instrument or who simply enjoy playing and making music. In order to prepare them for studying music in future years, students are given the opportunity to perform their instrument of choice, including voice, in a variety of live music settings. Throughout this process, the basics of theory, aural skills, and music analysis are covered and applied to performance skills on musical instruments, with a large focus on keyboard skills. An appreciation of music is encouraged through the study of Jazz and Rock music, with the works of major composers explored. The elements of music are brought to life with the integration of these concepts into students' own music-making experiences and the use of digital recording software.

SEMESTER 2 (8.1)

This course builds on the foundations laid in Semester 1, with students continuing to extend their performance and musicianship skills. In this Semester 2 subject students are given the opportunity to perform and refine their instrumental playing in a variety of live music settings. Extensive music theory, aural skills, and music analysis concepts are further covered. In gaining richer stylistic and cultural understandings, Blues and Jazz styles are explored, with students 'jamming' on 'Blues' based music in solo and band settings. Finally, students compose, perform and arrange music using digital music software.

Aims

  • To foster confidence and enjoyment in performing
  • To further students’ ability to play an instrument or sing
  • To learn both the history and performance techniques of film music
  • To develop better musicianship and aural skills
  • To compose music using digital recording software
  • Live Solo Performing
  • Film Music
  • Musicianship
  • Digital Music Composition/ Arranging
  • Musicianship (Theory and Aural)
  • Music Performance
  • Blues and Jazz Music Genres and Culture
  • The Recording Artist

Topics Include

  • Live Solo Performing
  • Film Music
  • Musicianship
  • Digital Music Composition/ Arranging
  • Musicianship (Theory and Aural)
  • Music Performance
  • Blues and Jazz Music Genres and Culture
  • The Recording Artist

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per Semester

Prerequisites

  • Students must be able to sing confidently or play an instrument

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Music performance, Music Genres, Music Theory, Digital Recording

“Praise the Lord, Praise God in his sanctuary; praise him in his mighty heavens. Praise him for his acts of power; praise him for his surpassing greatness. Praise him with the sounding of the trumpet, praise him with the harp and lyre, praise him with tambourine and dancing, praise him with the strings and flute, praise him with the clash of cymbals, praise him with resounding cymbals. Let everything that has breath praise the Lord. Praise the Lord” Psalm 150

 

 

OUTDOOR EDUCATION Elective Subject[NWS Year 8]

“The world would have us believe that winning or success is measured by points on a scoreboard or by dollar signs. The Christian realises that winning or success is determined by whether or not a goal has been achieved, and that goal is to bring glory to God.” Thomas M. Boqdon

Overview

This subject will introduce students to the basics in Outdoor Education. As part of Outdoor Education, students will undertake a variety of voluntary and challenging activities that help students develop lifelong skills including perseverance, teamwork and practical camping skills. Through a variety of fun and interactive lessons and camps, this subject is the perfect introduction to Outdoor Education and allows students to fully appreciate the wonders of God’s incredible creation. Students will also be introduced to the Duke of Edinburgh Award that students can complete in Year 9.

Aims

  • Students will learn more about and see parts of God’s incredible and diverse creation
  • Students will learn the basic skills necessary for an overnight hike
  • Learn how to best work in a team
  • Learn about various outdoor activities (hiking, mountain biking, surfing, kayaking, etc.)
  • Learn about some amazing adventures people have been on

Topics Include

  • Campcraft: Tent Pitching; Outdoor cooking; Packing a backpack; Reading a map; Using a compass
  • Teamwork
  • Duke of Edinburgh Award
  • Outdoor Activities
  • Adventurers

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle
  • This unit is offered in both Semesters 1 and 2

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Campcraft practical skills
  • Participation during outdoor experiences
  • Adventurers Presentation
  • Journal

“Do you not know that in a race all the runners run, but only one gets the prize? Run in such a way as to get the prize. Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever. Therefore I do not run like someone running aimlessly; I do not fight like a boxer beating the air. No, I strike a blow to my body and make it my slave so that after I have preached to others, I myself will not be disqualified for the prize.” 1 Corinthians 9:24-27

 

 

READY, SET, COOK Elective Subject[NWS Year 8]

“Look to your health; and if you have it, praise God and value it next to a good conscience; for health is the second blessing that we mortals are capable of – a blessing that money cannot buy; therefore value it, and be thankful for it.” Isaak Walton

Overview

Students explore the importance of food in our everyday living. God provides us with a body and the foods on this earth to nourish it well for optimum health, performance and service to others. We apply values of loving others in the way we prepare food for others and share the kitchen resources with fellow students. Students revise and further explore the basics of food safety and hygiene, use of kitchen equipment and cooking terminology.  We continue to build on basic nutrition knowledge that the students have by looking at healthy eating models, why we eat and meal planning. The students participate in practical and theory classes.

Aims

  • To increase confidence in the use of kitchen equipment
  • To understand and demonstrate practices to prevent food poisoning
  • To establish safe and efficient work practices in the kitchen
  • To develop an understanding of the functional and nutritional properties of food
  • To understand how our body uses nutrients in food and guides for healthy eating
  • To understand God’s concern for our health and wellbeing

Topics Include

  • Safety and Hygiene
  • Equipment and Terminology
  • Healthy Eating and meals

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle for Semester 1

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Suitable container to transport food
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Practical work and written evaluations
  • Bookwork
  • Assignment
  • Tests

“Everything that lives and moves will be food for you. Just as I gave you the green plants, I now give you everything”.  Genesis 9:3

 

 

SCIENCE: Forensic Science Elective Subject[NWS Year 8]

“The Christian faith of the early scientists gave them more than presuppositions; it also gave them motivation.  They believed that in studying nature they were discovering the wisdom and power of the Creator and were thus honouring Him.” James F. Jekel

Overview

Students will develop the critical thinking, research and practical skills to further enhance their scientific knowledge. They appreciate the relevance of scientific investigation techniques and skills which are to be applied to the topics of consumer science and forensic science. Students learn about how science is related to solving crimes and how each individual is unique and fearfully made by God. Relevant science concepts and processes are explored as students participate in activities that invite inquiry, logical thought and verification of information.

Aims

  • To gain an appreciation of the created universe
  • To encourage skills of enquiry, hypothesis and testing
  • To promote an interest and understanding of the knowledge and processes of science
  • To understand both the benefits and limits of scientific inquiry
  • To encourage students to consider the ways in which people have used scientific knowledge and methods to meet investigative requirements
  • To debate controversial scientific discoveries and applications
  • To plan, design and perform experiments
  • To further investigate the principles of the major disciplines of Science: Biology, Chemistry and Physics

Topics to be selected from

  • DNA and genetics
  • CSI: Forensic techniques
  • Historical Forensics
  • Science of Conflict
  • Ethics and Justice

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle
  • This unit is offered in Semester 2 only

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Assignments / Project Work
  • Practical Reports
  • Oral & Visual Presentations
  • Test

“But ask the animals, and they will teach you, or the birds in the sky, and they will tell you; or speak to the earth, and it will teach you, or let the fish in the sea inform you.” Job 12:7-8

 

 

SCIENCE: Medical Science Elective Subject[NWS Year 8]

“The Christian faith of the early scientists gave them more than presuppositions; it also gave them motivation.  They believed that in studying nature they were discovering the wisdom and power of the Creator and were thus honouring Him.” James F. Jekel

Overview

Students learn to develop their critical thinking, research and practical scientific skills to further enhance their scientific knowledge. Students appreciate the relevance of Science, applying scientific skills to the topic of medical science, specifically the germ theory of disease including the symptoms and treatments for specific diseases. Students begin to appreciate the complexity of design in body systems by examining the anatomy of the human body and how Science can be used compassionately to develop effective treatments to alleviate suffering. 

Aims

  • To encourage skills of enquiry, hypothesis and testing
  • To promote an interest and understanding of the knowledge and processes of science
  • To understand both the benefits and limits of scientific inquiry
  • To encourage students to consider the ways in which people have used scientific knowledge and methods to meet investigative requirements
  • To debate controversial scientific discoveries and applications
  • To plan, design and perform experiments
  • To further investigate the principles of the major disciplines of Science: Biology, Chemistry and Physics

Topics Include

  • Biochemistry of the body
  • Epidemology
  • Science and Social Justice
  • Body Systems
  • Disease

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle
  • This unit is offered in Semester 2 only

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Assignments / Project Work
  • Practical Reports
  • Oral & Visual Presentations
  • Test

“But ask the animals, and they will teach you, or the birds in the sky, and they will tell you; or speak to the earth, and it will teach you, or let the fish in the sea inform you.” Job 12:7-8


 

SPORTS SCIENCE Elective Subject[NWS Year 8]

“The world would have us believe that winning or success is measured by points on a scoreboard or by dollar signs. The Christian realises that winning or success is determined by whether or not a goal has been achieved, and that goal is to bring glory to God.” Thomas M. Boqdon

Overview

Students examine the major fitness components required to successfully perform an activity and the factors that affect them. They will learn the various training principles and training methods and how to appropriately apply to a training program that promotes improved athlete performance. Students participate in a variety of training sessions designed to improve or maintain fitness and evaluate the effectiveness of different training methods. Through this, students learn about the value that God places on looking after their physical body. Students critique the effectiveness of the implementation of training principles and methods to meet the needs of the individual. 

Aims

  • To explore the major fitness components and their importance  
  • To understand the different training principles and training methods  
  • To examine how the training principles are correctly applied to effectively improve performance 
  • To be able to analyse and evaluate individual case studies relating to effective training  
  • To create and implement a personalised physical activity program  

Topics Include

  • Fitness components 
  • Training principles 
  • Training methods 
  • Personalised physical activity programs 

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy cost – participation in classes at a local gym ($30)

Assessment

  • Personalised Physical Activity Case Study – 40%
  • Diary of Participation in Practical activities (including fitness components and methods) – 40%
  • Topic Tests – 20%

“Do you not know that in a race all the runners run, but only one gets the prize? Run in such a way as to get the prize. Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever. Therefore I do not run like someone running aimlessly; I do not fight like a boxer beating the air. No, I strike a blow to my body and make it my slave so that after I have preached to others, I myself will not be disqualified for the prize.” 1 Corinthians 9:24-27

 

 

SPORTS SCIENCE II Elective Subject[NWS Year 8]

“The world would have us believe that winning or success is measured by points on a scoreboard or by dollar signs. The Christian realises that winning or success is determined by whether or not a goal has been achieved, and that goal is to bring glory to God.” Thomas M. Boqdon

Overview

Students participate in a variety of theoretical and practical classes in order to gain a better understanding of coaching principles within sport. In this course, students will explore the fundamentals behind sports coaching and organizing sporting events. Throughout this course students will complete an AIS certificate in Community Coaching, providing a solid backbone to local coaching opportunities. Students will be able to test and apply their coaching knowledge through a number of sessions they will run with a junior year level and practice the organization skills necessary to run a junior school sporting event. After the completion of this course students will have a thorough understanding of the approaches to coaching and what it takes to organize a sporting event.

Aims

  • To complete the?AIS?Community Coaching General Principles online course 
  • To learn and apply the knowledge and practical skills necessary to be a successful coach?
  • To coach a junior year level through a sport unit?
  • To organise and run sporting events within the College?

Topics Include

  • AIS?Coaching Course (online) 
  • Coaching essentials:
    • Coaching styles: Autocratic, Democratic, Laissez-faire, Stages of learning?
    • Approaches to coaching: Direct based, Constraints based?
    • Skill classification?
  • Organising and running of sporting events
  • Coaching junior class in a sport unit

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy cost

Assessment

  • Completion of AIS Coaching Course (online) – 10% 
  • Coaching Session Plans (Written) – 20% 
  • Junior Coaching Sessions (Practical) – 20% 
  • Organization of Prep-Grade 2 House Athletics Carnival (Written) – 30% 
  • Running of Prep-Grade 2 House Athletics Carnival (Practical) – 20% 

“Do you not know that in a race all the runners run, but only one gets the prize? Run in such a way as to get the prize. Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever. Therefore I do not run like someone running aimlessly; I do not fight like a boxer beating the air. No, I strike a blow to my body and make it my slave so that after I have preached to others, I myself will not be disqualified for the prize.” 1 Corinthians 9:24-27

 

 

TEXTILES DESIGN AND TECHNIQUEElective Subject[NWS Year 8]

“The world is God’s epistle to mankind – His thoughts are flashing upon us from every direction.” Plato, 427-347 B.C.

Overview

Textile Design and Technique builds on the skills that students have developed in previous units of work. Students will implement digital and traditional design methods used by fashion designers, fabric designers and textile artists. They will annotate and source examples for mood board / Inspiration Pages. Creative choices will be made in terms of patterns, colour palettes, fabric selections, notions and embellishments. With safe and skilled knowledge and use of a sewing machine, they will create a number of products, considering style, fashion, function and fit. They will apply inventive techniques in producing functional and decorative products.

Aims

INVESTIGATING AND DESIGNING

  • To develop design briefs, including fictional clients and situations in order to work through the design process
  • Brainstorming visual ideas in an imaginative way by effectively responding to inspiration by drawing and annotating in a visual diary

PRODUCING

  • To safely and productively operate a sewing machine
  • The completion of quality construction tasks and products by accurately machine sewing, using straight stitch and zig-zag
  • The correct manipulation of tools, materials and equipment

ANALYSING AND EVALUATING

  • Changing design vision in order to alter decisions originally made

Topics Include

  • A study of selected textile artist/designers
  • Clothing and Textile Manufacturing’s environmental and ethical impact
  • Sustainably sewing products made from post-consumer materials
  • Character softies
  • Tie-dye T-Shirt

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Design Work
  • Production Work
  • Written Work

The heavens declare the glory of God; and the firmament shows His handiwork. Psalm 19:1

 

 

TO MARKET, TO MARKETElective Subject[NWS Year 8]

“Look to your health; and if you have it, praise God and value it next to a good conscience; for health is the second blessing that we mortals are capable of – a blessing that money cannot buy; therefore value it, and be thankful for it.” Isaak Walton

Overview

Students learn about the origins of their foods and different processing techniques that provide us with the range of food products that are available to us. The course explores the natural abundance of God’s provision to us and how we can include this in a balanced diet. Students discover the various stages of food production from farm to fork and deepen their understanding of the food industry as a whole. During regular practical cooking activities, students examine how foods change and respond to various cooking and processing techniques, whilst continuing to extend their recipe knowledge and organisational skills.

Aims

  • To increase confidence in the use of kitchen equipment
  • To understand and demonstrate practices to prevent food poisoning
  • To establish safe and efficient work practices in the kitchen
  • To develop an understanding of the functional and nutritional properties of food
  • To understand where our food comes from and the necessary processes to make it available and accessible to consumers
  • To understand God’s concern for our health and wellbeing

Topics Include

  • Equipment
  • Terminology
  • Kitchen Safety
  • Food hygiene/poisoning
  • Milk and milk products
  • Cereals
  • Fruit
  • Vegetables
  • Eggs

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle for Semester 2

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Suitable container to transport food
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Practical work and written evaluations
  • Bookwork
  • Assignment
  • Tests

“Then God said, “I give you every seed bearing plant on the face of the whole earth and every tree than has fruit with seed in it. They will be yours for food.” Genesis 1:29

 

 

TURNING POINTS IN HISTORYElective Subject[NWS Year 8]

“In everything that he undertook in the service of God’s temple and in obedience to the law and the commands,

he sought his God and worked wholeheartedly. And so he prospered.” 2 Chronicles 31:21

Overview

History is full of events that have shaped the World beyond human prediction and comprehension. One key aspect that has remain constant through each turning point has been the establishment of God’s kingdom to last beyond all human endeavours. Beginning with the fall of Rome and ending in World War 2, students will explore the impact of each event and how God’s presence and importance has renewed the development of the historical World.

Aims

  • To present a variety of types of historical events
  • To teach students to assess historical source documents, sites and artefacts
  • To develop an understanding of how the past affects the future
  • To understand that God wants us to know history and expects us to learn from a knowledge of history

Topics Include

  • Fall of Rome
  • Silk Road
  • Magna Carta
  • Rise of Islam
  • Renaissance and Reformation
  • Printing Press

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle for Semester 1 & 2

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Online materials

Assessment

  • All class work; research and developmental work, practical projects and document studies
  • Written work and assignments

“He has made everything beautiful in its time. He has also set eternity in the human heart; yet no one can fathom what God has done from beginning to end.” Ecclesiastes 3:11

 

 

VISUAL COMMUNICATIONElective Subject[NWS Year 8]

“Thinking cannot be clear till it has had expression. We must write, or speak, or act our thoughts, or they will remain in a half torpid form. Our feelings must have expression, or they will be as clouds, which, till they descend as rain, will never bring up fruit or flower. So it is with the inward feelings; expression gives them development.” Henry Ward Beecher

Overview

This unit focuses on using visual language to communicate messages, ideas and concepts. Students investigate how typography and imagery are used in visual communication design. They apply design thinking skills when exploring ways in which images and type can be manipulated to communicate ideas and concepts in different ways. Both two dimensional and three dimensional design solutions will be explored and presented. Students develop an understanding of the design process as a means of organising their thinking about approached to solving design problems and presenting ideas.

Aims

  • To develop skills in 3D construction
  • To develop design and rendering skills
  • To develop skills in using a variety of media
  • To develop skills in communicating information

Topics Include

  • Typography
  • Packaging Design
  • Elements and Principles of Design

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle for Semester 2

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Booklist Items
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • All class work; research and developmental work, practical projects and finished designs
  • Folio

“No-one ever spoke the way this man does.” John 7:4


 

WAVERLEY INSIDERS (Journalism) Elective Subject[NWS Year 8]

“We must contemplate the import of ignoring the printed word. If you cannot read, you can do only what you are told.” Joseph P. Bean

Overview

Journalism is one of the fastest changing careers and industries in our society. Year 8 Journalism encourages students to explore the power journalism to persuade, inform and challenge audiences through a variety of communication modes. Students consider the breath of journalism, examining practices in both traditional and contemporary media. The course starts with the basics of journalism, including how to develop a news story and skills of journalistic research. Students create their own stories, using interviews and research to come to informed conclusions about current topics. The course enhances literacy and critical thinking skills as students uncover the art of finding things out. Year 8 Journalism provides students with an opportunity to explore the concept of journalistic integrity and truth in a post-truth society. 

Aims

  • To examine the changing nature of journalism: the phenomenon of ‘fake news’
  • To develop research skills 
  • To develop creative, innovative and original pieces for publication
  • To develop familiarity with a wide range of traditional and emerging media forms

Topics Include

  • Basic Skills: Developing Stories
  • Journalistic Research
  • Contemporary Journalism

Time Allocation

  • 9 periods a cycle
  • This unit is offered in both Semester 1 and 2

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Booklist Items
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Contemporary Journalism Portfolio (collection of pieces published in different forms) 
  • Interviews
  • Traditional Journalism Portfolio (collection of expository and persuasive pieces)

“They read from the Book of the Law of God, making it clear and giving them meaning so that the people could understand what was being read” Nehemiah 8:8