Senior Secondary Curriculum [Years 11 & 12]

ACCOUNTING [VCE Subject]

OVERVIEW

This study enables students to:

  • Acquire knowledge and skills to record financial data and report accounting information in a manner that is appropriate for the needs of the user
  • develop an understanding of the role of accounting in the management and operation of a business
  • Develop skills in the use of ict in an accounting system
  • Develop an understanding of ethical considerations in relation to business decision-making
  • Develop the capacity to identify, analyse and interpret financial data and accounting information
  • Develop and apply critical thinking skills to a range of business situations
  • Use financial and other information to improve the accounting decision-making within a business

CONTENT

UNIT 1: Role of accounting in business

AREAS OF STUDY

The Role of Accounting

Individuals should consider a range of factors before committing to or continuing in a business venture. In this area of study students investigate the reasons for establishing a business and possible alternatives to operating a business. They explore types of business ownership, factors that lead to the success or failure of a business, sources of business finance and ethical considerations. They develop an understanding of the role and importance of accounting in operating a business, and consider how accounting is used to provide information for making operational and investment decisions.

Recording financial data and reporting accounting information for a service business

In this area of study students investigate the role of accounting in generating financial data and accounting information. They use the accrual method for determining profit for a service business operating as a sole proprietor with cash and credit transactions.

Students use both manual methods and ICT to record financial data and report accounting information. They apply accounting assumptions and qualitative characteristics, and use business documents and indicators to measure business performance in order to consider the success or failure of the business.

There are many indicators to measure the performance of a business. Some are financial, such as the amount of profit earned compared with investment or total sales made in a given period, while others are based on nonfinancial information, such as the speed with which invoices are paid, number of customers visiting a store in a given period, or trends in consumer preferences.

UNIT 2: Accounting and decision-making for a trading business

AREAS OF STUDY

Accounting for inventory

The strategic management of inventory is a key factor in the success or failure of a trading business. In this area of study students investigate use of both the First-In, First-Out (FIFO) and Identified Cost inventory cost assignment methods to record and report the movements of inventory through the business. Using both methods, students discuss the effect of relevant financial and non-financial factors, including ethical considerations, on the outcomes of decisions taken in relation to inventory.

Accounting for and managing accounts receivable and accounts payable

Managing accounts receivable and accounts payable successfully is essential to maintaining an adequate cash flow for a business. In this area of study students record and report transactions relating to accounts receivable and accounts payable. They examine strategies for managing credit transactions and use indicators, such as accounts receivable turnover and accounts payable turnover, to analyse decisions related to these areas. Students also take account of ethical considerations involved in managing accounts receivable and accounts payable and the effects of these on business performance.

Accounting for and managing non-current assets

In this area of study students develop an understanding of the accounting processes for non-current assets and the issues that can arise when determining a valuation for a non-current asset. Students calculate and apply depreciation using the straight-line method and undertake recording and reporting of depreciation.

UNIT 3: Financial accounting for a trading business

AREAS OF STUDY

Recording and analysing financial data

In this area of study students focus on identifying and recording financial data for a business. They use double entry accounting to record data and generate accounting information in the form of accounting reports and graphical representations. This information is used to assist the owner in making informed decisions about the operation of the business. Students should also consider strategies to improve the performance of the business, taking into account the ethical considerations relevant to the business owner.

Preparing and interpreting accounting reports

The preparation of financial reports at the end of the reporting period provides information to be used as a basis for planning and decision-making by the business owner. Students develop their understanding of the accounting processes and complete those processes that are applicable to the end of a reporting period for a trading business.

They apply the accrual method of accounting to the preparation of accounting reports and draw a distinction between cash and profit, considering the implications of these differences when using reports to make decisions.

Students undertake an analysis of accounting reports and interpret the information, taking into account relevant ethical considerations, in order to evaluate the performance of the business.

UNIT 4: Recording, reporting, budgeting and decision-making

AREAS OF STUDY

Extension of Recording and Reporting

In this area of study students further develop their understanding of the recording and reporting of financial data in the General Journal and General Ledger by focusing on balance day adjustments and the alternative methods of depreciating for non-current depreciable assets. Students prepare accounting reports using manual methods and ICT. They consider the effect of balance day adjustments on the accounting reports, and the implications of using alternative methods of depreciation on the accounting reports and on the performance of the business. They also examine ethical considerations that may effect the recording and reporting of financial data and business performance.

Budgeting and decision-making

Business owners must plan for future activities if they are to successfully manage the business. Preparing budgeted accounting reports provides the owner with information that will assist in managing and developing strategies to improve business performance. Students prepare and analyse budgeted accounting reports, both manually and using ICT, and suggest strategies to improve the performance of the business. They also discuss and evaluate the ethical considerations associated with business decision-making and business improvement.

BIBLICAL PERSPECTIVE

The study of accounting is based on the premise that people need to be accountable.

As Christians we can go one step further and highlight a very fundamental Biblical principle – that we are all ultimately accountable to God: “Nothing in all creation is hidden from God’s sight. Everything is uncovered and laid bare before the eyes of Him to whom we must give account” Hebrews 4:13

This subject develops this principle and focuses more specifically on our accountability to God in relation to money and talents. Matthew 25:14-30: Parable of the talents and Luke 16:1-13: Parable of the shrewd manager.

The course also helps encourage careful stewardship of the gifts that God has given through planning and budgeting.

ASSESSMENT

UNIT 1

Assessment tasks for this unit are selected from:

  • A folio of exercises utilising manual methods and ICT
  • Structured questions utilising manual methods and ICT
  • An assignment including use of ICT
  • A case study including use of ICT
  • A classroom presentation, role-play or debate
  • A report utilising ICT

 

UNIT 2

Assessment tasks for this unit are selected from:

  • A folio of exercises utilising manual methods and ICT
  • Structured questions utilising manual methods and ICT
  • An assignment including use of ICT
  • A case study including use of ICT
  • A classroom presentation, role-play or debate
  • A report utilising ICT

UNIT 3

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks allocated*

Outcome 1

Record financial data using a double entry system; explain the role of the General Journal, General Ledger and inventory cards in the recording process; and describe, discuss and analyse various aspects of the accounting system, including ethical considerations.

The student’s performance in each outcome will be assessed using one or more of the following:

  • Structured questions (manual and ICT based)
  • Folio of exercises (manual and ICT based)
  • A case study (manual and ICT based)
  • A report (written, oral or ICT based)

60

Outcome 2

Record transactions and prepare, interpret and analyse accounting reports for a trading business.

40

TOTAL MARKS

At least 30 marks must be allocated to ICT-based assessment

100

UNIT 4

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks allocated*

Outcome 1

Record financial data and balance day adjustments using a double entry system, report accounting information using an accrual-based system and evaluate the effect of balance day adjustments and alternative methods of depreciation on accounting reports

The student’s performance in each outcome will be assessed using one or more of the following:

 

  • Structured questions (manual and ICT-based)
  • Folio of exercises (manual and ICT-based)
  • A case study (manual and ICT-based)
  • A report (written, oral or ICT-based)

50

Outcome 2

Prepare budgeted accounting reports and

variance reports for a trading business using

financial and other relevant information, and model, analyse and discuss the effect of

alternative strategies on the performance of

a business

50

TOTAL MARKS

At least 30 marks must be allocated to ICT-based assessment

100

External assessment

The level of achievement for Units 3 and 4 is also assessed by an end-of-year examination, which will contribute 50 % to the study score.

 

 

ART [VCE Subject]

OVERVIEW

This study is designed to enable students to:

  • Acquire a broad knowledge of art
  • Develop ideas and conceptual and problem-solving skills through investigation and experimentation
  • Develop the technical skills and artistic awareness necessary to produce works of quality
  • Develop diversity in art practice through the investigation and experimentation of materials, techniques, processes and art forms understand aesthetics and the language of visual analysis
  • Develop critical awareness of how art relates to its cultural and historical contexts
  • Develop a critical awareness of the ways in which artists relate to the values, beliefs and traditions of societies
  • Develop skills to interpret art and to discuss and debate the ideas and issues which are raised

CONTENT

UNIT 1: ARTWORKS, EXPERIENCE AND MEANING

AREAS OF STUDY

Artworks and Meaning

This area of study introduces the concept of Analytical Frameworks to support the interpretation of the meanings and messages of artworks, both as intended by the artist and as interpreted by the viewer. Students learn that the analysis of an artwork’s formal qualities using the Formal Framework can enhance their understanding and interpretation of artworks. They gain an understanding that art may reflect the artist’s interests, experiences and thinking through applying the Personal Framework to read possible meanings of artworks. They also develop an understanding that the interpretation of the meanings and messages of art may be a personal response by the viewer. Students examine both historical and contemporary artworks that may be selected from a range of societies and cultures.

Artmaking and Meaning

In this area of study, students are encouraged to develop and apply skills while exploring areas of individual interest to create artworks. Students undertake a range of experiences that offer different ways of working. They build confidence through the guided exploration of techniques, materials and processes. Students apply skills of observation and imagination to the development of a folio of visual responses to a selection of set tasks. Students document their thinking as they engage in creative and technical processes. They reflect on their own artmaking and examine how they have used art elements and principles to develop their visual language. They use the Formal Framework and the Personal Framework to analyse the formal qualities in their artworks.

In their artmaking, students focus on realising their ideas through the exploration of techniques, selected art forms and media. They are introduced to a range of materials, skills and concepts through processes of discussion and investigation. Teachers set specific tasks to direct and facilitate investigation and experimentation.

UNIT 2: ARTWORKS AND CONTEMPORARY CULTURE

AREAS OF STUDY

Contemporary Artworks and Culture

This area of study focuses on the ways in which art reflects and communicates the values, beliefs and traditions of the societies for and in which it is created. Students explore and investigate the ways in which the world and the artist have changed over time and the factors that influence these changes. They apply the Formal Framework and the Cultural Framework in their analysis and interpretation of artworks of at least four artists.

Art Making and Contemporary Culture

In this area of study students explore areas of personal interest related to their cultural identification and experiment with visual language to present their ideas. Observations, imagination, ideas or concepts may be starting points for them to experiment with techniques, materials, processes and art forms. Using the Formal Framework, they analyse formal qualities in their artworks and document their creative and technical processes. They reflect on their own artmaking and examine how they have used art elements and principles to develop their visual language. They examine their artmaking and reflect on how cultural aspects are evidenced in their artwork. They use appropriate health and safety practices with respect to the impact of their arts practice upon themselves and their environment.

UNIT 3: ARTWORK, IDEAS AND VALUES

AREAS OF STUDY

Interpreting Art

In this area of study students respond critically as they interpret the meanings and messages of artworks. They develop, examine and analyse their own and others’ opinions and use evidence to support different points of view. Students undertake research to support their analysis. Using appropriate art language, they compare and contrast artworks produced before 1990 with artworks produced since 1970.

Students must undertake:

  • The study of at least one artist who produced work before 1990 and at least one other artist who has produced work since 1990
  • A comparison and contrast of these artists with detailed analysis of at least two artworks by each artist
  • The application of relevant aspects of all the analytical frameworks across each of the selected artworks to interpret the meanings and messages

Investigation and Interpretation through Artmaking

In this area of study students develop their own art responses inspired by ideas, concepts and observations. They apply imagination and creativity as they explore and develop their visual language through the investigation and experimentation of materials, techniques, processes and art form/s. They engage in ongoing exploration, reflection, analysis and evaluation as they progressively develop and refine their ideas. They document and analyse their thinking and working practices throughout this process, using the language and context of selected Analytical Frameworks to guide their reflection. They use appropriate technical skill to produce at least one finished artwork as they continue to develop the body of work that will be completed at the end of Unit 4. Students employ appropriate health and safety practices in the development of their practical work.

UNIT 4: DISCUSSING AND DEBATING ART

AREAS OF STUDY

Discussing Art

Students discuss art ideas and issues such as the varying interpretations of the role of art in society. They research, analyse and interpret artworks related to their discussion. They refer to a range of resources and commentaries to examine opinions and arguments and refer to artists and artworks to support their points of view. They use relevant aspects of the Analytical Frameworks to provide structure for their analysis. They make use of a range of commentaries to support and/or challenge art issues.

In this area of study, students must study:

  • One art idea and related issues
  • At least one artist not studied in unit 3 and a minimum of two artworks by that artist
  • A range of diverse viewpoints as seen in commentaries relating to artworks and art issues

Realisation and Resolution

Students continue to develop the body of work begun in Unit 3 and work toward resolved ideas and concepts leading to at least one finished artwork other than the work that was completed for Unit 3. They reflect on personal concepts and ideas as they progressively develop and refine their artworks. They continue to use the Analytical Frameworks to reflect on the formal and personal, cultural and contemporary qualities and aspects as appropriate to their artworks. They document their thinking and working practices, reflecting exploration, experimentation and skill. They use and analyse appropriate formal elements and principles, and continue to apply appropriate health and safety practices relevant to their use of materials, techniques and processes.

BIBLICAL PERSPECTIVE

God created the world out of nothing. For the human artist, we must begin with what is, in order to create what is imaginary. Creating and making, looking and responding enables students to fulfil their God given roles as creators and makers. It is our responsibility to draw closer to God and understand Him better through studying and using observational skills to perceive and respond to what we see. We are responsible to think on beautiful things and to appreciate the beauty God has provided. God evaluated His creative works when they were finished. God gives a specific command we are to respond differently from the world. God’s creations communicate His truth and love to man.

Through their study of Art Appreciation, students begin to develop an awareness of God’s role in the Fine Arts and discover God’s purpose for Art in society. Artists who have worked for God’s glory demonstrate and reflect all that is true, praiseworthy and holy. The role and responsibility of the Christian Artist in the production of Art work will not debase or degenerate creation, but emphasize its wonder and glorify its Creator.

ASSESSMENT

UNIT 1

Assessment tasks for Outcome 1 are selected from:

  • An extended written response
  • Short-answer responses supported by visual references
  • An annotated visual report
  • A multimedia presentation

Assessment task for Outcome 2 is:

  • A developmental folio of visual responses to a selection of set tasks

UNIT 2

Assessment tasks for Outcome 1 are selected from:

  • An extended written response
  • Short-answer responses supported by visual references
  • An annotated visual report
  • A multimedia presentation

Assessment task for Outcome 2 is:

  • A folio of visual responses including at least one finished artwork

UNIT 3

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks Allocated*

Outcome 1

Use the Analytical Frameworks to analyse and interpret artworks produced before 1990 and artworks produced since 1990, and compare and contrast the meanings and messages of artworks produced before 1990 with those of artworks produced since 1990.

Any one or a combination of the following tasks:

  • A written report
  • An extended response
  • Short responses
  • Structured questions
  • An annotated visual report
  • A multimedia presentation

30

TOTAL MARKS

30

*School-assessed coursework for Unit 3 contributes 10 %

 

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks Allocated*

Outcome 1

Discuss an art issue using selected artist/s works as context, and present their informed opinion with reference to artworks and with the support of selected commentaries and relevant aspects of the Analytical Frameworks.

Any one or a combination of the following tasks:

  • A written report
  • An extended response
  • Short responses
  • Structured questions
  • An annotated visual report
  • A multimedia presentation

30

TOTAL MARKS

30

*School-assessed coursework for Unit 4 contributes 10 %

 

 

 

BIOLOGY [VCE Subject]

OVERVIEW

Biology is the study of created living organisms. Throughout their studies, students consider life down to the molecular level; amino acids, fatty acids, nucleic acids and saccharides. The understanding of these molecules and their interactions allow students to uncover the intelligent design behind specialised cells, leading to complex organ systems and organisms that make up ecosystems. Hereditary is studied as an application within understanding family histories and how our genetic information effects our physical attributes. This is scaffolded to understanding how humans are able to selectively breed and manipulate plants and animals to develop greater crop yield for feeding a growing global population.

CONTENT

UNIT 1:  HOW DO LIVING THINGS STAY ALIVE?

AREAS OF STUDY

How Do Organisms Function?

In this area of study students examine the structure and functioning of cells and how the plasma membrane contributes to survival by controlling the movement of substances into and out of the cell. Although the internal structure of a cell varies, all cells require a relatively stable internal environment for optimal functioning. Whether life forms are unicellular or multicellular, or heterotrophic or autotrophic, whether they live in a deep ocean trench, a tropical rain forest, an arid desert or on the highest mountain peak, all individual organisms are faced with the challenge of obtaining nutrients and water, exchanging gases, sourcing energy and having a means of removal of waste products.

How Do Living Systems Sustain Life?

In this area of study students examine the structural, physiological and behavioural adaptations of a range of organisms that enable them to survive in a particular habitat and to maintain a viable population size over time. Students consider the distinction between the external and internal environment of an organism and examine how homeostatic mechanisms maintain the internal environment within a narrow range of values for factors including temperature, blood glucose and water balance. They explore the importance and implications of organising and maintaining biodiversity and examine the nature of an ecosystem in terms of the network of relationships within a community of diverse organisms. Students identify a keystone species, explore an organism’s relationship to its habitat and evaluate the impact of abiotic factors on the distribution and abundance of organisms within the community. Factors affecting population size and growth are analysed.

Practical Investigation

Survival requires control and regulation of factors within an individual and often outside the individual. In this area of study students design and conduct a practical investigation into the survival of an individual or a species. The investigation requires the student to develop a question, plan a course of action to answer the question, undertake an investigation to collect the appropriate primary qualitative and/or quantitative data, organise and interpret the data and reach a conclusion in response to the question. The investigation is to be related to knowledge and skills developed in Areas of Study 1 and/or 2 and is conducted by the student through laboratory work, fieldwork and/or observational.

UNIT 2:  HOW IS CONTINUITY OF LIFE MAINTAINED?

AREAS OF STUDY

How Does Reproduction Maintain The Continuity Of Life?

In this area of study students consider the need for the cells of multicellular organisms to multiply for growth, repair and replacement. They examine the main events of the cell cycle in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Students become familiar with the key events in the phases of the cell cycle, and focus on the importance of the processes involved in a cell’s preparation for cell division. Students investigate and use visualisations and modelling to describe the characteristics of each of the phases in mitosis. Cytokinesis is explained for both plant and animal cells. Students describe the production of gametes in sexual reproduction through the key events in meiosis and explain the differences between asexual and sexual reproduction in terms of the genetic makeup of daughter cells. Students consider the role and nature of stem cells, their differentiation and the consequences for human prenatal development and their potential use to treat injury and disease.

How Is Inheritance Explained?

In this area of study students build on their understanding of the nature of genes and the use of genetic language to read and interpret patterns of inheritance and predict outcomes of genetic crosses. They gain an understanding that a characteristic or trait can be due solely to one gene and its alleles, or due to many genes acting together, or is the outcome of genes interacting with external environmental or epigenetic factors. Students apply their genetic knowledge to consider the social and ethical implications of genetic applications in society including genetic screening and decision making regarding the inheritance of autosomal and sex-linked conditions.

Investigation Of An Issue

The increasing uses and applications of genetics knowledge and reproductive science in society both provide benefits for individuals and populations and raise social, economic, legal and ethical questions. Human cloning, genetic modification of organisms, the use of forensic DNA databanks, assisted reproductive technologies and prenatal and predictive genetic testing challenge social and ethical norms. In this area of study students apply and extend their knowledge and skills developed in Areas of Study 1 and/or 2 to investigate an issue involving reproduction and/or inheritance.

They communicate the findings of their investigation and explain the biological concepts, identify different opinions, outline the legal, social and ethical implications for the individual and/or species and justify their conclusions. Material for the investigation can be gathered from laboratory work, computer simulations and modelling, literature searches, global databases and interviews with experts.

UNIT 3:  HOW DO CELLS MAINTAIN LIFE?

AREAS OF STUDY

How Do Cellular Processes Work?

In this area of study students focus on the cell as a complex chemical system. They examine the chemical nature of the plasma membrane to compare how hydrophilic and hydrophobic substances move across it. They model the formation of DNA and proteins from their respective subunits. The expression of the information encoded in a sequence of DNA to form a protein is explored and the nature of the genetic code outlined. Students use the lac operon to explain prokaryotic gene regulation in terms of the ‘switching on’ and ‘switching off’ of genes.

Students learn why the chemistry of the cell usually takes place at relatively low, and within a narrow range of temperatures. They examine how reactions, including photosynthesis and cellular respiration, are made up of many steps that are controlled by enzymes and assisted by coenzymes. Students explain the mode of action of enzymes and the role of coenzymes in the reactions of the cell and investigate the factors that affect the rate of cellular reactions.

How Do Cells Communicate?

In this area of study students focus on how cells receive specific signals that elicit a particular response. Students apply the stimulus-response model to the cell in terms of the types of signals, the position of receptors, and the transduction of the information across the cell to an effector that then initiates a response. Students examine unique molecules called antigens and how they elicit an immune response, the nature of immunity and the role of vaccinations in providing immunity. They explain how malfunctions in signalling pathways cause various disorders in the human population and how new technologies assist in managing such disorders.

UNIT 4:  HOW DOES LIFE CHANGE AND RESPOND TO CHALLENGES OVER TIME?

AREAS OF STUDY

How Are Species Related?

In this area of study students focus on changes to genetic material over time and the evidence for biological evolution. They investigate how changes to genetic material lead to new species through the process of natural selection as a mechanism for evolution. Students examine how evolutionary biology and the relatedness of species is based upon the accumulation of evidence. They learn how interpretations of evidence can change in the light of new evidence as a result of technological advances, particularly in molecular biology. The human fossil record is explored to identify the major biological and cognitive trends that have led to a complex interrelationship between biology and culture.

How Do Humans Impact On Biological Processes?

In this area of study students examine the impact of human culture and technological applications on biological processes. They apply their knowledge of the structure and function of the DNA molecule to examine how molecular tools and techniques can be used to manipulate the molecule for a particular purpose. Students describe gene technologies used to address human issues and consider their social and ethical implications. Scientific knowledge can both challenge and be challenged by society. Students examine biological challenges that illustrate how the reception of scientific knowledge is influenced by social, economic and cultural factors.

Practical Investigation

A student-designed or adapted investigation related to cellular processes and/or biological change and continuity over time is undertaken in either Unit 3 or Unit 4, or across both Units 3 and 4. The investigation is to relate to knowledge and skills developed across Units 3 and 4 and may be undertaken by the student through laboratory work and/or fieldwork. The investigation requires the student to identify an purpose, develop a question, formulate a hypothesis and plan a course of action to answer the question and that complies with safety and ethical guidelines. The student then undertakes an experiment that involves the collection of primary qualitative and/or quantitative data, analyses and evaluates the data, identifies limitations of data and methods, links experimental results to science ideas, reaches a conclusion in response to the question and suggests further investigations which may be undertaken. The results of the investigation are presented in a scientific poster format according to the template provided by VCAA. A practical logbook must be maintained by the student for record, authentication and assessment purposes.

BIBLICAL PERSPECTIVE

Through the study of Biology, students discover the irrefutable intelligent design evident in all levels of life from interacting molecules within cellular reactions through to the complexities of maintaining sustainable ecosystems. Through their studies of evolution, students navigate and debate varying worldviews - seeking to understand the biblical truth written in genetic code. Students write ethics essays on key issues such as abortion, IVF, euthanasia, genetic engineering or cloning to develop arguments to speak the biblical truth in these controversial biological arguments.

ASSESSMENT

UNIT 1

For Outcomes 1 and 2 from a range of:

  • A report of a fieldwork activity
  • Annotations of a practical work folio of activities or investigations
  • A bioinformatics exercise
  • Media response
  • Data analysis
  • Problem solving involving biological concepts, skills and/or issues
  • A reflective learning journal/blog related to selected activities or in response to an issue
  • A test comprising multiple choice and/or short answer and/or extended response

For Outcome 3

  • A report of a student-designed or adapted investigation related to the survival of an organism or a species using an appropriate format, for example a scientific poster, practical report, oral communication or digital presentation

UNIT 2

For Outcomes 1 and 2 from a range of:

  • A report of a fieldwork activity
  • Annotations of a practical work folio of activities or investigations
  • A bioinformatics exercise
  • Media response
  • Data analysis
  • Problem solving involving biological concepts, skills and/or issues
  • A reflective learning journal/blog related to selected activities or in response to an issue
  • A test comprising multiple choice and/or short answer and/or extended response

For Outcome 3

  • A report of an investigation into genetics and/or reproductive science using an appropriate format, for example, digital presentation, oral communication or written report

UNIT 3

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks Allocated*

Outcome 1

Explain the dynamic nature of the cell in terms of key cellular processes including regulation, photosynthesis and cellular respiration, and analyse factors that affect the rate of biochemical reactions

A report related to at least two practical activities from a practical logbook

 

The assessment task may be written or multimodal.

50

Outcome 2

Apply a stimulus-response model to explain how cells communicate with each other, outline human responses to invading pathogens, distinguish between the different ways that immunity may be acquired, and explain how malfunctions of the immune

system cause disease

At least one task selected from:

  • A report of a practical activity
  • Annotations of activities or investigations from a practical logbook
  • A graphic organiser
  • A bioinformatics exercise
  • An evaluation of research
  • Media response
  • Data analysis
  • A response to a set of structured questions
  • Problem solving involving biological concepts, skills and/or issues
    • A reflective learning journal/blog related to selected activities or in response to an issue

50

TOTAL MARKS

100

*School-assessed Coursework for Unit 3 contributes 16 %

UNIT 4

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks Allocated*

Outcome 1

Analyse evidence for evolutionary change, explain how relatedness between species

is determined, and elaborate on the

consequences of biological change in human evolution

A report using primary or secondary data.

 

The assessment task may be written or multimodal.

30

Outcome 2

Describe how tools and techniques can be used to manipulate DNA, explain how biological knowledge is applied to biotechnical applications, and analyse the interrelationship between scientific knowledge and its applications in society

A response to an issue

 

OR

 

A report of a laboratory investigation

 

The assessment task may be written or multimodal.

30

Outcome 3

Design and undertake an investigation related to cellular processes and/or biological change and continuity over time,

and present methodologies, findings and conclusions in a scientific poster

A structured scientific poster according to the VCAA template

(not exceeding 1000 words)

30

TOTAL MARKS

90

*School-assessed Coursework for Unit 4 contributes 24 %

EXTERNAL ASSESSMENT

The level of achievement for Units 3 and 4 is also assessed by an end-of-year examination.

The examination will contribute 60 %.

 

 

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT [VCE Subject]

OVERVIEW

As the Christian leaders of tomorrow, both in the church and in business, it is important that our students have a strong understanding of what it means to lead and manage. Business Management examines the ways in which people at various levels within a business organisation manage resources to achieve the objectives of the organisation. The study recognises that there is a range of management theories. In each unit, students examine some of these theories and through exposure to real business scenarios and direct contact with business, compare them with management in practice.

CONTENT

Businesses of all sizes are major contributors to the economic and social wellbeing of a nation. Therefore, how businesses are formed and the fostering of conditions under which new business ideas can emerge are vital for a nation’s wellbeing. Taking a business idea and planning how to make it a reality are the cornerstones of economic and social development. In this unit students explore the factors affecting business ideas and the internal and external environments within which businesses operate and the effect of these on planning a business.

UNIT 1: PLANNING A BUSINESS

AREAS OF STUDY

The Business Idea

In this area of study students investigate how business ideas are created and how conditions can be fostered for new business ideas to emerge. New business ideas are formed through a range of sources, such as identifying a gap in the market, technological developments and changing customer needs. Students explore some of the issues that need to be considered before a business can be established.

External Environment

The external environment consists of all elements outside a business that may act as pressures or forces on the operations of a business. Students consider factors from the external environment such as legal, political, social, economic, technological, global and corporate social responsibility factors and the effects these may have on the decisions made when planning a business. Students investigate how the internal environment relates to the external environment and the effects of this relationship on planning a business.

Internal Environment

The internal environment affects the approach to and success of business planning. The owner will generally have more control over the activities, functions and pressures that occur within a business. These factors, such as business models, legal business structures and staffing, will also be influenced to some extent by the external environment. Students explore the factors within the internal environment and consider how planning decisions may have an effect on the ultimate success of a business.

UNIT 2: ESTABLISHING A BUSINESS

AREAS OF STUDY

Legal Requirements And Financial Considerations

It is essential to deal with legal and financial matters when establishing a business. In this area of study students are introduced to the legal requirements and financial considerations that are vital to establishing a business. They also consider the implications for the business if these requirements are not met.

Marketing a Business

Establishing a strong customer base for a business is an important component of success. In this area of study students develop their understanding that marketing encompasses a wide range of management practices, from identifying the needs of the target market and establishing a brand presence, through to considerations on price, product features and packaging, promotion, place, people, physical evidence and processes. They also consider effective public relations strategies and the benefits and costs these can bring to a business.

Staffing a Business

Staff are one of the business’s greatest assets and are an important consideration when establishing a business. The quantity and quality of staff has a direct link to business productivity and the achievement of business objectives. In this area of study students examine the staffing requirements that will meet the needs and objectives of the business and contribute to productivity and effectiveness. They research the processes undertaken by the business with relation to the recruitment, selection and induction of staff. Students consider the opportunities that the skills and capabilities of staff can contribute to the business, the legal obligations that must be addressed and the relationship between employers and employees within a business.

UNIT 3: MANAGING A BUSINESS

AREAS OF STUDY

Business Foundations

This area of study introduces students to the key characteristics of businesses and their stakeholders. Students investigate potential conflicts between and the different demands of stakeholders on a business. They examine a range of management styles and management skills that may be used when managing a business and apply these to contemporary business case studies.

Managing Employees

In this area of study students investigate essential factors such as motivation and training involved in effectively managing employees during their time at a business to ensure the business objectives are achieved. They consider Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, Locke and Latham’s Goal Setting Theory and Lawrence and Nohria’s Four Drive Theory of motivation. Using the theories and motivation strategies, students propose and justify possible solutions to employee management in contemporary business case studies. Students gain an overview of workplace relations, including the main participants and their roles in the dispute resolution process.

Operations Management

The production of goods and services is the core objective of businesses. Effective management of the process of transforming inputs into outputs is vital to the success of a business, both in terms of maximising the efficiency and effectiveness of the production process and meeting the needs of stakeholders. In this area of study students examine operations management and consider the best and most responsible use of available resources for the production of a quality final good or service in a competitive, global environment.

UNIT 4: TRANSFORMING A BUSINESS

AREAS OF STUDY

Reviewing Performance – The Need For Change

In this area of study students develop their understanding of the need for change. Managers regularly review and evaluate business performance through the use of key performance indicators and use the results to make decisions concerning the future of a business. Managers can take both a proactive and reactive approach to change. Students investigate the ways a business can search for new business opportunities as a source of future business growth and consider current forces for change on a business. They apply Lewin’s Force Field Analysis theory to contemporary case studies and consider approaches to strategic management, using Porter’s (1985) Generic Strategies.

Implementing Change

In this area of study students explore how businesses respond to evaluation data. It is important for managers to know where they want a business to be positioned for the future before implementing a variety of strategies to bring about the desired change. Students consider the importance of leadership in change management, how leaders can inspire change and the effect change can have on the stakeholders in a business. They consider the principles of Senge’s Learning Organisation and apply the Three Step Change Model (Lewin) in implementing change in a business. Using a contemporary business case study from the past four years, students evaluate business practice against theory, considering how corporate social responsibility can be incorporated into the change process.

ASSESSMENT UNITS 1 & 2

Suitable tasks for assessment may be selected from the following:

  • A case study analysis
  • A business research report
  • Development of a business plan and/or feasibility study
  • An interview and a report on contact with business
  • A school-based, short-term business activity
  • A business simulation exercise
  • An essay
  • A business survey and analysis
  • A media analysis

BIBLICAL PERSPECTIVE

Biblical leadership principles are examined as students consider the application of management styles and skills to their own lives and to possible careers in a business environment. In addition, students will evaluate social responsibility and ethics in examining change in large organisations. The application of conflict resolution strategies (see Matt 18:15 and 1 Corinthians 6) will be considered. God has created us to be in relationship both with Himself and with our fellow human beings. Therefore, students must consider how strong, Christ-centred relationships can be developed and maintained as an integral part of harmonious interactions within the business organisation.

ASSESSMENT

UNIT 1

Assessment tasks for these units are selected from the following:

  • Case study analysis
  • Business research (print and online)
  • Development of a marketing and/or public relations plan
  • Interview and report on contact with business
  • Business simulation exercise
  • Essay
  • Test
  • Computer applications and simulations
  • Business survey and analysis
  • Analytical exercises
  • Media analysis
  • Report (written, visual, oral)

UNIT 3

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks Allocated*

Outcome 1

Discuss the key characteristics of businesses and stakeholders, and analyse the relationship between corporate culture, management styles and management skills

The student’s performance on each outcome is assessed using one or more of the following:

  • A case study
  • Structured questions
  • An essay
  • A report
  • A media analysis

20

Outcome 2

Explain theories of motivation and apply them to a range of contexts, and analyse and evaluate strategies related to the management of employees.

 

40

Outcome 3

Analyse the relationship between business objectives and operations management, and propose and evaluate strategies to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of business operations.

 

40

TOTAL MARKS

100

*School-assessed coursework for Unit 3 contributes 25 %

 

UNIT 4

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks Allocated*

Outcome 1

Explain the way business change may come about, use key performance indicators to analyse the performance of a business, discuss the driving and restraining forces for change and evaluate management strategies to position a business for the future.

The student’s performance on each outcome is assessed using one or more of the following:

• a case study

• structured questions

• an essay

• a report

• a media analysis.

50

Outcome 2

Evaluate the effectiveness of a variety of strategies used by managers to implement change and discuss the effect of change on the stakeholders of a business.

 

50

TOTAL MARKS

100

*School-assessed coursework for Unit 4 contributes 25 %

 

 

CHEMISTRY [VCE Subject]

OVERVIEW

Chemistry is a key science in explaining the workings of our universe through an understanding of the properties and interaction of substances that make up matter. A knowledge of chemistry gives an understanding of a broad range of human activities including medicine, domestic science, industrial development, use of machines and scientific research. As such, chemistry is a prerequisite or recommended subject for a large number of tertiary courses. However, students should be encouraged to study this subject not simply because they must, rather, it provides a chance to understand more about the materials we encounter in everyday life.

CONTENT

UNIT 1:  HOW CAN THE DIVERSITY OF MATERIALS BE EXPLAINED?

AREAS OF STUDY A

How Can Knowledge Of Elements Explain The Properties Of Matter?

In this area of study, students focus on the nature of chemical elements, their atomic structure and their place in the periodic table. They review how the model of the atom has changed over time, consider how spectral evidence led to the Bohr model and, subsequently, to the Schrödinger model. Students examine the periodic table as a unifying framework into which elements are placed based upon similarities in their electronic configurations. In this context, students explore patterns, trends of and relationships between elements, with reference to properties of the elements, including their chemical reactivity.

Students investigate the nature of metals and their properties, including metallic nanomaterials. They investigate how a metal is extracted from its ore and how the properties of metals may be modified for a particular use. Students apply their knowledge of the electronic structures of metallic elements and non-metallic elements to examine ionic compounds. They study how ionic compounds are formed, explore their crystalline structures and investigate how changing environmental conditions may change their properties.

Fundamental quantitative aspects of chemistry are introduced including the mole concept, relative atomic mass, percentage abundance, composition by mass and empirical formula.

How Can The Versatility Of Non-Metals Be Explained?

In this area of study students explore a wide range of substances and materials made from non-metals including molecular substances, covalent lattices, carbon nanomaterials, organic compounds and polymers.

Students investigate the relationship between the electronic configurations of non-metallic atoms, the resultant structures and the properties of a range of molecular substances and covalent lattices. They compare how the structures of these non-metallic substances are represented and analyse the limitations of these representations.

Students study a variety of organic compounds and how they are grouped into distinct chemical families. They apply rules of systematic nomenclature to each of these chemical families. Students investigate useful materials that are made from non-metals and relate their properties and uses to their structures. They explore the modification of polymers and the use of carbon-based nanoparticles for specific applications.

Students apply quantitative concepts to molecular compounds, including the mole concept, percentage composition by mass and empirical and molecular formulas of given compounds.

Research Investigation

Knowledge of the origin, structure and properties of matter has built up over time through scientific and technological research, including medical research, space research and research into alternative energy resources. As a result, patterns and relationships in structures and properties of substances have been identified, applied and modified, and a vast range of useful materials and chemicals has been produced. This research and development is ongoing and new discoveries are being made at an accelerating rate.

In this area of study, students apply and extend their knowledge and skills developed in Area of Study 1 and Area of Study 2 to investigate a selected question related to materials. They apply critical and creative thinking skills, science inquiry skills and communication skills to conduct and present the findings of an independent investigation into one aspect of the discoveries and research that have underpinned the development, use and modification of useful materials or chemicals.

For the selected question, students outline, analyse and evaluate relevant evidence to support their conclusions.

UNIT 2: WHAT MAKES WATER SUCH A UNIQUE CHEMICAL?

AREAS OF STUDY

How Do Substances Interact With Water?

In this area of study, students focus on the properties of water and the reactions that take place in water including acid-base and redox reactions. Students relate the properties of water to the water molecule’s structure, polarity and bonding abilities. They also explore the significance of water’s high specific heat capacity and latent heat of vaporisation for living systems and water supplies. Students investigate issues associated with the solubility of substances in water. Precipitation, acid-base and redox reactions that occur in water are explored and represented by the writing of balanced equations. Students compare acids with bases and learn to distinguish between acid strength and acid concentration. The pH scale is examined and students calculate the expected pH of strong acids and strong bases of known concentration.

How Are Substances In Water Measured And Analysed?

In this area of study students focus on the use of analytical techniques, both in the laboratory and in the field. These are used to measure the solubility and concentrations of solutes in water and to analyse water samples for various solutes including chemical contaminants.

Students examine the origin and chemical nature of substances that may be present in a water supply, including contaminants, and outline sampling techniques used to assess water quality. They measure the solubility of substances in water, explore the relationship between solubility and temperature using solubility curves and learn to predict when a solute will dissolve or crystallise out of solution.

The concept of molarity is introduced and students measure concentrations of solutions using a variety of commonly used units. Students apply the principles of stoichiometry to gravimetric and volumetric analyses of aqueous solutions and water samples. Instrumental techniques include the use of colorimetry and/or UV-visible spectroscopy to estimate the concentrations of coloured species in solution, atomic absorption spectroscopy data to determine the concentration of metal ions in solution and high performance liquid chromatography data to calculate the concentration of organic compounds in solution.

Practical Investigation

Substances that are dissolved in water supplies may be beneficial or harmful, and sometimes toxic, to humans and other living organisms. They may also form coatings on, or corrode, water pipes. In this area of study students design and conduct a practical investigation into an aspect of water quality. The investigation relates to knowledge and skills developed in Area of Study 1 and Area of Study 2 and is conducted by the student through laboratory work and/or fieldwork.

The investigation requires the student to develop a question, plan a course of action that attempts to answer the question, undertake an investigation to collect the appropriate primary qualitative and/or quantitative data (which may including collecting water samples), organise and interpret the data and reach a conclusion in response to the question.

UNIT 3: HOW CAN CHEMICAL PROCESSES BE DESIGNED TO OPTIMISE EFFICIENCY?

AREAS OF STUDY

What Are The Options For Energy Production?

In this area of study students focus on analysing and comparing a range of energy resources and technologies, including fossil fuels, biofuels, energy efficiencies, environmental impacts and potential applications, galvanic cells and fuel cells, with reference to the energy transformations and chemical reactions involved. Students use the specific heat capacity of water and thermochemical equations to determine the enthalpy changes and quantities of reactants and products involved in the combustion reactions of a range of renewable and non-renewable fuels.

Students conduct practical investigations involving redox reactions, including the design, construction and testing of galvanic cells, and account for differences between experimental findings and predictions made by using the electrochemical series. They compare the design features, operating principles and uses of galvanic cells and fuel cells, and summarise cell processes by writing balanced equations for half and overall cell processes.

How Can The Yield Of A Chemical Product Be Optimised?

In this area of study students explore the factors that increase the efficiency and percentage yield of a chemical manufacturing process while reducing the energy demand and associated costs.

Students investigate how the rate of a reaction can be controlled so that it occurs at the optimum rate while avoiding unwanted side reactions and by-products. They explain reactions with reference to the collision theory including reference to Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution curves. The progression of exothermic and endothermic reactions, including the use of a catalyst, is represented using energy profile diagrams.

Students explore homogeneous equilibrium systems and apply the equilibrium law to calculate equilibrium constants and concentrations of reactants and products. They investigate Le Chatelier’s principle, the effect of different changes on an equilibrium system and make predictions about the optimum conditions for the production of chemicals, taking into account rate and yield considerations. Students represent the establishment of equilibrium and the effect of changes to an equilibrium system using concentration-time graphs.

Students investigate a range of electrolytic cells with reference to their basic design features, purpose, operating principles and energy transformations that occur. They examine the discharging and recharging processes in rechargeable cells and apply Faraday’s laws to calculate quantities in electrochemistry and to determine cell efficiencies.

UNIT 4: HOW ARE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS CATEGORISED, ANALYSED AND USED

AREAS OF STUDY

How Can The Diversity Of Carbon Compounds Be Explained And Categorised?

In this area of study students explore why such a vast range of carbon compounds is possible. They examine the structural features of members of several homologous series of compounds, including some of the simpler structural isomers, and learn how they are represented and named.

Students investigate trends in the physical and chemical properties of various organic families of compounds. They study typical reactions of organic families and some of their reaction pathways, and write balanced chemical equations for organic syntheses.

Students learn to deduce and confirm the structure and identity of organic compounds by interpreting data from mass spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy and proton and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

What Is The Chemistry Of Food?

Food contains various organic compounds that are the source of both the energy and the raw materials that the human body needs for growth and repair. In this area of study, students explore the importance of food from a chemical perspective.

Students also study the major components of food with reference to their structures, properties and functions. They examine the hydrolysis reactions in which foods are broken down, the condensation reactions in which new biomolecules are formed and the role of enzymes, assisted by coenzymes, in the metabolism of food.

Students study the role of glucose in cellular respiration and investigate the principles of calorimetry and its application in determining enthalpy changes for reactions in solution. They explore applications of food chemistry by considering the differences in structures of natural and artificial sweeteners, the chemical significance of the glycaemic index of foods, the rancidity of fats and oils and the use of the term ‘essential’ to describe some amino acids and fatty acids in the diet.

Practical Investigation

A student-designed or adapted practical investigation related to energy and/or food is undertaken in either Unit 3 or Unit 4, or across both Units 3 and 4. The investigation relates to knowledge and skills developed across Unit 3 and/or Unit 4.

The investigation requires the student to identify a purpose, develop a question, formulate a hypothesis and plan a course of action to answer the question and that complies with safety and ethical requirements. The student then undertakes an experiment that involves the collection of primary qualitative and/or quantitative data, analyses and evaluates the data, identifies limitations of data and methods, links experimental results to science ideas, reaches a conclusion in response to the question and suggests further investigations which may be undertaken. Findings are communicated in a scientific poster format. A practical logbook must be maintained by the student for record, authentication and assessment purposes.

BIBLICAL PERSPECTIVE

Many topical issues are explored in the units of study, allowing opportunities to discuss these from a Christian viewpoint. The Psalmist reminds us that “the earth is the Lord’s and everything in it” (Ps 24:1), but at creation God gave man a position of authority under His authority. As His stewards of the earth, we need to treat its chemical resources responsibly. It is important that we show concern for our “neighbour” - the present and future generations that may be affected by waste disposal - and for the treatment of the environment and the excessive use or misuse of materials. Through understanding the chemical principles involved in God’s Creation, students of Chemistry become equipped to produce, modify and analyse substances encountered in everyday life.

The group and discussion work purposes to foster cooperation and mutual respect between students.

It is hoped that increased understanding of the complexity and the order of the materials that make up our physical world will inspire wonder at the creation and appreciation of our mighty Creator.

ASSESSMENT

UNIT 1

For this unit students are required to demonstrate achievement of three outcomes. As a set, these outcomes encompass all areas of study. Suitable tasks for assessment may be selected from the following:

For Outcomes 1 from a range of:

  • Annotations of a practical work folio of activities or investigations
  • A report of a practical activity or investigation
  • A modelling activity
  • Media response
  • Problem-solving involving chemical concepts, skills and/or issues
  • A reflective learning journal/blog related to selected activities or in response to an issue
  • Data analysis
  • A test comprising multiple choice and/or short answer and/or extended response

For Outcome 3

  • A report of an independent investigation of a topic selected from Area of Study 1 and/or Area of Study 2, using an appropriate format, for example digital presentation, oral communication or written report

UNIT 2

For this unit students are required to demonstrate achievement of three outcomes. As a set, these outcomes encompass all areas of study.

Suitable tasks for assessment may be selected from the following:

For Outcomes 1 and 2

  • Annotations of a practical work folio of activities or investigations
  • A report of a practical activity or investigation
  • A modelling activity
  • Media response
  • Problem solving involving chemical concepts, skills and/or issues
  • A reflective learning journal/blog related to selected activities or in response to an issue
  • Data analysis
  • A test comprising multiple choice and/or short answer and/or extended response

For Outcome 3

  • A report of a student-designed quantitative laboratory investigation using an appropriate format, for example digital presentation, oral communication, scientific poster or written report

UNIT 3

UNIT 4

EXTERNAL ASSESSMENT

The level of achievement for Units 3 and 4 is also assessed by an end-of-year examination. The examination will contribute to 60 %.

COMPUTING [VCE Subject]

OVERVIEW

This study enables students to:

  • Apply skills, techniques, processes and a methodology to create digital solutions that meet a range of needs and conditions
  • Understand how data can be represented in digital systems and structured and manipulated to become part of a digital solution
  • Become independent and discerning users of digital systems, able to critically appraise the opportunities and appropriateness of different digital systems in a range of settings
  • Understand the components of information systems and the architecture of the associated digital systems
  • Understand how digital systems, processes, legislation and personal behaviours can affect the integrity and security of data and information
  • Apply computational, design and systems thinking skills when creating digital solutions

CONTENT

UNIT 1: COMPUTING

AREAS OF STUDY

Data And Graphic Solutions

In this area of study students conduct an investigation into an issue, practice or event and through the systematic collection, interpretation and manipulation of primary data they create a graphic solution, such as an infographic, that represents their findings. Examples of investigations include the social networking habits of people of different age groups, the heritage of a class of students to three generations and music preferences by genre and favourite artists within each. Graphic solutions could include charts, flowcharts, diagrams, images, hierarchies, animations, maps and timelines.

Students develop and apply a detailed understanding of data, including its types, characteristics, sources and methods of acquisition. Relevant primary data is collected and then evaluated to determine its suitability for manipulation. When acquiring this data, students consider risks associated with using data owned by other people or organisations, and apply strategies and techniques for acknowledging legal requirements and ethical responsibilities.

Students apply computational thinking skills when extracting meaning from data and apply design thinking knowledge and skills to create graphic information for the purpose of informing, educating or persuading an audience. No restrictions are placed on the software tool used to create these solutions.

Networks

In this area of study students investigate how networks with wireless capability allow data and information to be exchanged locally and within the global environment. Students examine the hardware and software components and procedures required to connect and maintain a wireless network. They focus on ways in which the security of exchanged and stored data and information can be compromised in wireless networks, in order to understand ways of controlling the networked devices they use. Students apply this technical knowledge to create the design for a network with wireless capability that meets a need or opportunity, identifying its components and how data and information are transmitted. Students use a software tool to depict the components of their network and its interactions.

When designing network solutions, students apply systems thinking by considering how users will interact with the network and the potential effects of the network on users and their data and information.

Collaboration And Communication

In this area of study students examine how the use of particular information systems within specified contexts can cause tensions and conflicts between different stakeholders. Students develop the ability to critically appraise how information systems are used and how individuals can be empowered to shape their use.

Working in virtual (local, national, international) or face-to-face teams, students use web authoring software to create a website, designed for viewing on a mobile device, which presents an overview of an issue associated with one field. When designing their website students apply their knowledge of information architecture such as structuring sets of information to facilitate navigation and allowing users choices about levels of detail. They evaluate the merits of storing their website and its content in the cloud or on a private server.

Project plans are prepared to support an organised approach to problem solving. Students use software to record tasks to be completed and team member responsibilities and schedules. Students record and monitor progress of the website development. Students do not have to use dedicated project management software.

On their website students present the viewpoints of different stakeholders, drawing on evidence acquired from primary and/or secondary sources. They publish the team’s opinions about the issue and propose actions that can be taken to shape how information systems are used, for example, using social media to encourage actions or inviting comments in a forum. Students use visualising thinking tools to analyse content, online collaborative tools to support sharing of ideas, and techniques to assist in forming team opinions. They use other appropriate software to manipulate acquired data such as image, numeric, text and sound editing tools, and web authoring tools to communicate viewpoints.

UNIT 2: COMPUTING

AREAS OF STUDY

Programming

In this area of study students focus on using a programming or scripting language that can support object-oriented programming to create working software modules. These languages provide users with greater flexibility than application software, as specific sets of instructions can be implemented to create solutions that are purpose designed. Flexibility exists regarding the specific language studied. Depending on its nature the language could also be used in Area of Study 2.

Students develop skills in interpreting teacher-provided solution requirements and in designing working modules. They apply methods and techniques for completing a series of small discrete tasks or working modules that use features of a programming or scripting language, including predefined classes. They apply knowledge and skills associated with the design and development stages of the problem-solving methodology. Details of this methodology are on pages 14–16.

Students also apply computational and design thinking skills when preparing design specifications and transforming them into working modules through the use of programming or scripting languages.

Data Analysis And Visualisation

In this area of study students learn to use software tools to access, select and, where appropriate, manipulate authentic data from large data repositories, and to present the key aspects of the data in an appropriate visual form. Once the data has been isolated and checked for its integrity, students create data visualisations that assist in reducing the complexity of data by using designs that illustrate patterns, connections and structure. These visualisations should minimise the effort required by readers to interpret complex data and they need to be clear, usable and relevant. Some data visualisation tools allow presentations to be dynamic and/or interactive. Appropriate visualisation forms include graphs, charts, spatial relationships, maps, histograms and network diagrams (nodes and edges).

Sources of large data repositories include the Bureau of Meteorology, World Development Indicators, Australian Bureau of Statistics, United Nations, CSIRO, OECD. Appropriate tools to extract or structure data and create visualisations include a programming language, database software, spreadsheet software and data visualisation software. It is important that students engage in a two-step approach when creating visualisations: acquiring and preparing data (step one) and manipulating data into a visual form (step two). In response to teacher-provided design briefs, students apply all stages of the problem-solving methodology.

Data Management

In this area of study students are introduced to the structure of databases and their applicability in a range of settings. Databases underpin many applications such as borrowing and booking systems, medical records and social media websites. Students develop an understanding of the purposes of databases by exploring the data and information they supply to and receive from systems such as banking, membership, online purchasing and voting systems. They apply systems thinking skills when considering the effects of their interactions with information systems that use databases.

Students develop and apply knowledge and skills in determining data types required to solve specific problems, and in organising and storing data. They examine the flexibility of databases by constructing query searches and sorts, and apply design principles that contribute to effective and efficient data collections tools, input forms and reports. Where appropriate, students apply mathematical calculations to the data and may create macros to automate repetitive tasks. Students devise a need or opportunity for a solution and collect relevant data for manipulation by database management software. This facilitates a deeper understanding of the benefits and risks associated with using database solutions. Students apply all stages of the problem-solving methodology.

UNIT 3:  SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT

AREAS OF STUDY

Programming Practice

In this area of study students focus on the design and development stages of the problem-solving methodology and computational thinking skills. Students examine the features and purposes of different design tools so they can accurately interpret the requirements for working software modules. Students interpret given designs and create working modules using a programming language, undertaking the problem-solving activities of coding, testing and documenting (development stage). Students use a programming language that meets the programming requirements published annually by the VCAA in the VCAA Bulletin.

The working modules do not have to be complete solutions and can focus on limited features of the programming language however, students are expected to fully develop the working modules in accordance with the given designs. Each module should allow the testing of the program logic in readiness for creating a complete solution in Unit 4. Testing techniques are applied to ensure modules operate as intended and students learn to write internal documentation in the code that they develop.

Analysis And Design

In this area of study students construct the framework for the creation of a software solution that meets a need or opportunity determined by individual students. This is the first part of a project, with the second part undertaken in Unit 4, Outcome 1.

In this area of study students analyse a real-world need or opportunity identified by them. The analysis is stated in terms of solution requirements, constraints and scope (analysis stage of problem-solving methodology) and presented as a software requirements specification.

There are two steps to designing. Initially, through the application of design and systems thinking skills, students generate two or three different design ideas for creating their solution. These are briefly stated and could include annotations to indicate key functions and layouts. The next step involves developing and applying evaluation criteria to select the preferred design idea. This is then fully detailed, addressing both the functionality and user interface of the solution. The evaluation criteria will be used in Unit 4 to evaluate the quality of this solution.

Students prepare a project plan, taking into account all stages of the problem-solving methodology covered in this outcome and in Unit 4, Outcome 1. Students do not have to use dedicated project-management software. Students determine the milestones of their project.

UNIT 4:  SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT

AREAS OF STUDY

Software Solutions

In this area of study students further develop their computational thinking skills by using the programming language studied in Unit 3 to transform the design they prepared in Unit 3, Outcome 2 into a software solution that meets specific needs or opportunities.

Students prepare a useability test that addresses the core features of their solution. The test must be undertaken by at least two other ‘users’ and the results recorded. Students can make any necessary adjustments to their solution based on these results.

During the project students apply techniques to record their progress on their plan, such as showing actual versus expected durations, achievement of milestones, modifications to the plan to show adjustments and annotations to explain these modifications. Students evaluate the quality of their solution using criteria developed in Unit 3 and they assess the effectiveness of their project plan in managing their project.

Interactions And Impact

In a globalised economy and society, organisations are increasingly dependent on data supplied by other organisations. The integrity of the supplied data can affect the ability of an information system to achieve objectives. In this area of study students focus on the interactions between information systems that share data and how the performance of one of these systems is dependent on the integrity of the data. For example, timely and accurate weather reports generated by one information system can be used by an airline’s information system to reschedule flights, reducing risks to commuters.

Students apply systems thinking skills when examining information systems that share data. They develop knowledge of factors that influence the integrity of data and consider processes used within information systems to manage the storage, communication and disposal of data. Students investigate the capabilities of information systems operating in a networked environment and how these systems can be secured to enhance the integrity of data. They examine the importance of applying technical protocols when interacting with information systems and the consequences of violating these protocols.

BIBLICAL PERSPECTIVE

Students are to be responsible citizens in a global society. Christian character should be demonstrated in the way students collaborate and communicate using technology. They are to be ‘good workman’ in the creative use of the various tools that God has provided and be ‘wise as serpents’ in recognising and avoiding the dangers of technology while being as ‘harmless as doves’ in their personal use of technology.

UNIT 3

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks Allocated*

Outcome 1

Interpret design requirements and apply a range of functions and techniques using a programming language to develop working modules

In response to teacher-provided designs, create working modules to meet specific needs.

10

Outcome 2

Analyse and document a need or opportunity, generate alternative design ideas, represent the preferred solution design and formulate a project plan for creating the solution

An analysis that defines the requirements, constraints and scope of a solution in the form of a software requirements specification AND

A folio of two to three alternative design ideas and the detailed design specifications of the preferred design AND

A project plan (Gantt chart) indicating times, resources and tasks

15

UNIT 4

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks Allocated

Outcome 1

Apply stages of the problem-solving methodology to create a solution using a programming language that fulfils identified requirements and assess the effectiveness of the project plan in monitoring progress

A software solution that meets the software requirements specification and the results of the useability test

AND

An assessment of the extent to which the project plan (Gantt chart) assisted in monitoring project progress in one of the following:

  • A written report
  • An annotated visual plan

15

Outcome 2

Analyse and explain the dependencies between two information systems and evaluate the controls in place in one information system to protect the integrity of its source data

In response to a case study, one of the following:

  • Aa written report
  • An annotated visual report

10

*School-assessed Task (SAT) for Units 3 and 4 contributes 30 % to the study score. The SAT is Unit 3 Outcome 2 combined with Unit 4 Outcome 1

*School-assessed coursework (SAC) for Unit 3 and 4 contributes 20 percent to the study score. The SAC’s are Unit 3 0utcome 1 and Unit 4 Outcome 2

 

 

DRAMA STUDIES [VCE Subject]

OVERVIEW

In VCE Drama, students tell stories, explore ideas, make sense of their worlds and communicate meaning through the practice of performance-making. The study of drama enables students’ individual and collective identities to be explored, expressed and validated. Students develop an ability to empathise through understanding and accepting diversity.

CONTENT

UNIT 1: INTRODUCING PERFORMANCE STYLES

AREAS OF STUDY

Creating a devised performance

In this area of study students use play-making techniques to devise and develop solo performances and/or ensemble performances based on a range of stimulus material relevant to their personal, cultural and/or community experiences and stories. Students explore a range of performance styles and draw on ideas as they respond to a given structure and stimulus material. They also focus on recording and documenting the play-making techniques used in the development of this performance work.

Presenting a devised performance

In this area of study students present to an audience a devised solo and/or ensemble drama works based on a range of stimulus material relevant to the student’s personal, cultural and/or community experiences and stories. The performance should be based on the work devised in Outcome 1. Students use a range of performance styles to present these stories, ideas and characters to an audience. They also begin to explore and develop skills in establishing and maintaining an appropriate actor–audience relationship.

Analysing a devised performance

In this area of study students focus on observation and analysis of their own performance work completed in Outcomes 1 and 2. They reflect upon and document work processes using appropriate drama terminology. They demonstrate development of the use of expressive skills, performance skills, stimulus material, dramatic elements, conventions, production areas, performance styles, and approaches to character and roles.

Analysing a professional drama performance

In this area of study students observe and analyse a performance by professional drama performers. Drama performances by students enrolled at a school may not be analysed for this outcome. Attending and analysing a performance by professional drama performers provides opportunities for students to make connections with their own work. They build their experience of how dramatic elements, conventions, performance styles, production areas, and expressive and performance skills can be manipulated to communicate meaning in performance. Students learn about ways of establishing, sustaining and manipulating actor–audience relationships and use appropriate drama terminology to explain, analyse and evaluate the performance.

UNIT 2: AUSTRALIAN IDENTITY

AREAS OF STUDY

Using Australia as inspiration

In this area of study students explore the use of a range of stimulus material to create a performance based on a person, an event, an issue, a place, an artwork, a text and/or an icon from a contemporary or historical Australian context. As they work with stimulus material and a performance structure, students explore and experiment with ways that play-making techniques, expressive skills, performance skills, dramatic elements, conventions, performance styles and production areas may be used to realise the dramatic potential of stimulus material and shape dramatic action. Students also consider how to use techniques intentionally to have an effect on and engage the audience in ways that are appropriate to contemporary drama practice. Students record and document their use of play-making techniques and the creative processes used to shape and to develop this performance work.

Presenting a devised performance

In this area of study students present a performance to an audience of a devised work based on a person, an event, an issue, a place, an artwork, a text and/or an icon from an Australian context. The performance should be based on the work developed for Outcome 1, and should take place in a performance space appropriate to the theme or the subject matter of the drama.

Analysing a devised performance

In this area of study students observe and analyse their own performance work completed in Outcomes 1 and 2. They reflect on and articulate the ways they used play-making techniques and processes to explore and to extract the dramatic potential of the stimulus material. Students analyse their approaches to shaping and refining their work and creating and manipulating the actor–audience relationship. They continue to develop the use of appropriate drama terminology.

Analysing an Australian drama performance

In this area of study students observe and analyse a performance by professional drama performers. Drama performances by students enrolled at school cannot be analysed for this outcome. Students use appropriate drama terminology to explain, analyse and evaluate how the use of dramatic elements, conventions, performance styles, production areas, expressive skills, performance skills, and the actor–audience relationship may be manipulated to communicate meaning in performance.

UNIT 3: DEVISED ENSEMBLE PERFORMANCE

AREAS OF STUDY

Devising and presenting ensemble performance

In this area of study students develop and present a devised ensemble performance. They examine the work of a range of drama practitioners working in selected performance styles to explore how dramatic work is created. Students work with given stimulus material and guidelines that provide a starting point for the structure of a performance. They apply their knowledge of ways other drama practitioners work to devise and shape their work to communicate meaning and to have an impact on their audience in specific and intentional ways. Students use play-making techniques to extract dramatic potential from the stimulus, and devise and develop characters, story and meaning in the ensemble performance.

Analysing a devised ensemble performance

In this area of study students analyse the ensemble performance devised in Outcome 1. They describe, reflect upon, interpret, analyse and evaluate the construction and performance of this ensemble performance. They analyse the selection, use and manipulation of conventions (including application of symbol and transformation of character, time and place), dramatic elements, expressive skills, performance skills, play-making techniques, production areas and selected performance styles. Students also use appropriate drama terminology to discuss their own performance work and to analyse the dramatic potential of stimulus material and resources for developing characters for an ensemble performance.

Analysing and evaluating a professional drama performance

In this area of study students analyse and evaluate a professional drama performance selected from the prescribed VCE Drama Unit 3 Playlist. Students analyse the actors’ use of expressive and performance skills to represent character and to communicate meaning in the performance. They consider how the actor–audience relationship is created and manipulated and analyse and evaluate how the conventions, dramatic elements, production areas and performance styles are used in the performance.

UNIT 4: DEVISED SOLO PERFORMANCE

AREA OF STUDY

Demonstrating techniques of solo performance

In this area of study students explore, and develop skills in, play-making techniques in the development of a short solo performance. They demonstrate application of symbol and transformation of character, time and place. Teachers provide stimulus material appropriate to the size of the task, such as a person, an event, an issue, a place, an image, one word, a definition, a quotation, lyrics, a sound or an icon.

Devising a solo performance

In this area of study students create and develop a solo performance in response to a prescribed structure. They draw on an understanding of performance styles from a range of historical, cultural and social contexts. During their solo performance, students use conventions including application of symbol and transformation of character, time and place. They may also use other conventions such as asides, caricature, exaggerated movement, heightened use of language, pathos, placards, satire, song, stillness and silence, as appropriate to the requirements of a prescribed structure. The resulting work will go beyond a representation of real life as it is lived.

Analysing and evaluating a devised solo performance

In this area of study students use appropriate drama terminology to analyse and evaluate the creative processes used in the creation, development and presentation of a solo performance devised in response to a prescribed structure. To support their analysis and evaluation, students draw on examples of conventions, including application of symbol and transformation of character, time and place, dramatic elements, expressive skills, performance skills, performance styles, play-making techniques, production areas and use of stimulus material.

BIBLICAL PERSPECTIVE

The stage can be a particularly good expression of our Christian values and theologies, because it is an art form that unfolds through a process, just like spiritual transformation. A play and its characters never stand still but play out in a dynamic sequence of moments. This gives the Christian writer the opportunity to play both sides of descriptive and prescriptive drama. By creating a transformational arc, drama can show the possibility of change, and how and why people are able to change. Since drama is a visual medium, artists need to learn how to show change, as achieved through irrevocable choices. A writer can show what the change looks like, again through the new choices that character makes as the story progresses. There is a fascination for some for studying the theatre and its ability to express values, to communicate the human condition, to combine all the arts together in their most collaborative of all art forms. As students at a Christian school, we would seek to embrace both drama and theology, seeing in each a complementary intersection that is most wise, profound and natural.

ASSESSMENT

UNIT 1

Outcome 1

  • Demonstrate the use of play-making techniques to devise and develop a solo and/or ensemble drama works based on stories and/or characters
  • Document the use of processes to create and develop stories and characters in drama in: A paper-based journal, An e-journal, A journal that combines hard and soft copy components

Outcome 2

Perform devised solo and/or ensemble drama work that features stories and characters

Outcome 3

Analyse the drama work created and performed in Outcomes 1 and 2 using one of the following formats:

  • An oral presentation
  • A multimedia presentation
  • Responses to structured questions

Outcome 4

Write an analysis in response to structured questions.

UNIT 2

Outcome 1

  • Demonstrate the use of play-making techniques to devise and develop a solo and/or ensemble drama works based on stories and/or characters
  • Document the use of processes to create and develop stories and characters in drama in: A paper-based journal, An e-journal, A journal that combines hard and soft copy components

Outcome 2

Perform a devised solo or ensemble drama work that features stories and characters.

Outcome 3

Analyse the drama work created and performed in Outcomes 1 and 2 using one of the following formats:

  • An oral presentation
  • A multimedia presentation
  • Responses to structured questions.

Outcome 4

Write an analysis in response to structured questions.

UNIT 3

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks Allocated*

Outcome 1

Develop and present characters within a devised ensemble performance that goes beyond a representation of real life as it is lived

Development and presentation of characters within a devised ensemble performance. Each student should have approximately 5 to 8 minutes of primary focus performance time in the work

100

Outcome 2

Analyse the use of processes, techniques

and skills to create and present a devised

ensemble performance

Analysis of the development and performance of characters from the ensemble work developed for Outcome 1. The analysis and evaluation may be presented in one or both of the following formats:

  • An oral presentation
  • Written responses to structured questions

25

Outcome 3

Analyse and evaluate a professional drama performance

An analysis and evaluation of a play selected from the Unit 3 Playlist. The analysis and evaluation will be presented as written responses to structured questions

25

TOTAL MARKS

150

UNIT 4

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks Allocated*

Outcome 1

Demonstrate, in response to given stimulus material, application of symbol and transformation of character, time and place, and describe the techniques used

A one- to two-minute presentation of a solo demonstration devised from given stimulus material

AND

A short oral or written statement, which describes techniques used in the demonstration

15

 

 

 

10

Outcome 3

Analyse and evaluate the creation, development and presentation of a solo performance devised in response to a prescribed structure

Analysis and evaluation of the solo performance devised in Outcome 2. The analysis and evaluation may be presented in one or both of the following formats:

  • An oral presentation
  • Written responses to structured questions

25

TOTAL MARKS

 

50

EXTERNAL ASSESSMENT

The level of achievement for Units 3 and 4 is also assessed by an end-of-year performance examination, which will contribute 35 % to the study score, and an end-of-year written examination, which will contribute 25 % to the study score.

 

 

ENGLISH [VCE Subject]

OVERVIEW

Living in contemporary society requires competence in communicating to others.  The acquisition of such competence is the responsibility of all Christians. The English Course is designed to progressively develop competence in the four basic areas of language: reading, writing, speaking and listening.

Within this basic framework, students are given the opportunity to:

  • Gain a critical understanding of language as an instrument for clear, and effective communication
  • Expand and enhance their creative and imaginative gifts
  • Become proficient in the processes of drafting, editing and assessing their own writing
  • Learn to read with enjoyment, perception and discrimination
  • Gain competence in their ability to evaluate information, organise ideas and form a personal opinion
  • Develop confidence in their ability to formulate, articulate and express (verbally or in writing) their thoughts and feelings about themselves, their world and their reading.

CONTENT

UNIT 1

AREAS OF STUDY

Reading and Creating Texts

This Area of Study encourages students to explore how meaning is created in a text. Students identify, discuss and analyse decisions authors have made. They explore how authors use structures, conventions and language to represent characters, settings, events, explore themes, and build the world of the text for the reader. Students develop the ability to respond to texts in various forms, such as writing an analytical essay and a creative response from within the world of the text.

Analysing and Presenting Argument

In this Area of Study students focus on the analysis and construction of texts that attempt to influence an audience. They explore the use of language, both written and visual, for persuasive effect and the structure and presentation of an argument.

UNIT 2

AREAS OF STUDY

Reading and Comparing Texts

In this Area of Study students explore how comparing texts can provide a deeper understanding of ideas, issues and themes. They investigate how the reader’s understanding of one text is broadened and deepened when considered in relation to another text.

Analysing and Presenting Argument

In this Area of Study, students continue to develop the skills from the same Area of Study in Unit 1.

Listening to texts - EAL Students Only

In this Area of Study, students develop and redifine their listening skills, while using active strategies.

UNIT 3

AREAS OF STUDY

Reading and Creating Texts

In this area of study students identify, discuss and analyse how the features of selected texts create meaning and how they influence interpretation. In identifying and analysing explicit and implied ideas and values in texts, students examine the ways in which readers are invited to respond to texts. They develop and justify their own detailed interpretations of texts.

Analysing Argument

In this area of study students analyse and compare the use of argument and language in texts that debate a topical issue. The texts must have appeared in the media since 1st September of the previous year. Students read and view media texts in a variety of forms, including print, non-print, and multimodal, and develop their understanding of the way in which language and argument complement one another in positioning the reader.

Listening to Texts – EAL students only

In this area of study students develop and redefine their listening skills. They listen to a range of spoken texts and use active listening strategies to understand information, ideas and opinions presented in texts.

UNIT 4

AREAS OF STUDY

Reading and Comparing Texts

In this area of study students explore the meaningful connections between two texts. They analyse texts, including the interplay between character and setting, voice and structure, and how ideas, issues and themes are conveyed. By comparing texts, they gain a deeper understanding of the ideas, issues and themes that reflect the world and human experiences.

Presenting Argument

In this area of study students build their understanding of both the analysis and construction of texts that attempt to influence audiences. They use their knowledge of argument and persuasive language as a basis for the development of their own persuasive texts in relation to a topical issue that has appeared in the media since 1st September of the previous year.

BIBLICAL PERSPECTIVE

As stated previously, competence in language both written and oral, is of vital importance if students are to become effective communicators of the Gospel. However, Christian students need to develop basic skills not only to communicate the truth, but also to discern truth. Students must be able to comprehend and analyse what they are reading and to be able to clearly explain and justify their responses.

Through the study of literature, the media, drama and the students’ own writing, various social values are examined from a Biblical perspective. Common issues which arise and are explored include:

  • Gender roles
  • The family
  • Relationships
  • Suffering and adversity
  • Race relations discrimination
  • The spiritual aspect of man’s personality
  • Ambition and aspirations

In addition, English purposes to extend the students’ appreciation of the beauty and goodness which exists in God’s world. Literature has an important role to play in the development of the students’ understanding of themselves and the world, and is a valuable tool in discussions on the nature of man and our Christian responsibility to God and His creation.

ASSESSMENT

UNITS 1 & 2

Tasks include:

  • An analytical response to a set text
  • A creative response to a set text such as a monologue, script or short story
  • An analysis of the use of argument and persuasive language in text/s
  • Oral presentations, intended to position an audience
  • Written persuasive tasks
  • A comparative analytical response to set texts
  • Listening tasks (EAL only)

UNIT 3

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks Allocated*

Outcome 1

Produce an analytical interpretation of selected text, and a creative response to a different selected text.

English Students

An analytical interpretation of a selected text in written form

AND

A creative response to a selected text in written or oral form with a written explanation of decisions made in the writing process and how these demonstrate understanding of the text.

 

30

30

EAL Students

An analytical interpretation of a selected text in written form

OR

A creative response to a selected text in written or oral form with a written explanation of creative decisions and how these demonstrate understanding of the text.

40

Outcome 2

Analyse and compare the use of argument and persuasive language in texts that present a point of view on an issue currently debated in the media.

For English Students

An analysis and comparison, in written form, of argument and the use of persuasive language in two to three texts that present a point of view on an issue. Texts must include written and visual material and have appeared in the media since 1 September of the previous year.

40

For EAL Students

A demonstration of understanding of two to three texts that present a point of view on an issue through:

  • Short-answer responses
  • Note form summaries

An analysis and comparison of argument and the use of persuasive language in the same two to three texts, in written form.

Texts must include visual material and have appeared in the media since 1 September of the previous year.

10

30

Outcome 3

EAL Only Comprehend a spoken text

For EAL Students

Comprehension of a spoken text through:

  • Short-answer responses
  • Note-form summaries

20

TOTAL MARKS

100

*School-assessed coursework for Unit 3 contributes 25 % to the study score

UNIT 4

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks Allocated*

Outcome 1

Produce a detailed comparison which analyses how two selected texts present ideas, issues and themes.

For All Students

A detailed comparison in written form of how two selected texts present ideas, issues and themes.

All Students

60

Outcome 2

Construct a sustained and reasoned point of view on an issue currently debated in the media.

For All Students

A written statement of intention to accompany the student’s own oral presentation, articulating the intention of decisions made in the planning process, and how these demonstrate understanding of argument and persuasive language.

 

A point of view presented in oral form using sound argument and persuasive language. The point of view should relate to an issue that has appeared in the media since 1 September of the previous year. The issue does not have to be the same as the issue selected for study in Outcome 2, Unit 3.

All Students

10

30

TOTAL MARKS

100

*School-assessed coursework for Unit 4 contributes 25 % to the study score

 

 

HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT [VCE Subject]

OVERVIEW

This study is designed to enable students to:

  • Understand the complex nature of health and wellbeing, and human development
  • Develop a broad view of health and wellbeing, incorporating physical, social, emotional, mental and spiritual dimensions, and biological, sociocultural and environmental factors
  • Examine how health and wellbeing may be influenced across the lifespan by the conditions into which people are born, grow, live, work and age
  • Develop health literacy to evaluate health information and take appropriate and positive action to support health and wellbeing and manage risks
  • Develop understanding of the Australian healthcare system and the political and social values that underpin it
  • Apply social justice principles to identify health and wellbeing inequities and analyse health and wellbeing interventions
  • Apply the objectives of the united nations’ sustainable development goals to evaluate the effectiveness of health and wellbeing initiatives and programs
  • Propose and implement action to positively influence health and wellbeing, and human development, outcomes at individual, local, national and/or global levels

CONTENT

UNIT 1: UNDERSTANDING HEALTH AND WELLBEING

AREAS OF STUDY

Health perspectives and influences

This area of study takes a broad, multidimensional approach to health and wellbeing. Such an approach acknowledges that defining and measuring these concepts is complicated by a diversity of social and cultural contexts. Students consider the influence of age, culture, religion, gender and socioeconomic status on perceptions of and priorities relating to health and wellbeing. They look at measurable indicators of population health, and at data reflecting the health status of Australians. With a focus on youth, students enquire into reasons for variations and inequalities in health status, including sociocultural factors that contribute to variations in health behaviours.

Health and nutrition

This area of study explores food and nutrition as foundations for good health and wellbeing. Students investigate the roles and sources of major nutrients and the use of food selection models and other tools to promote healthy eating. They look at the health and wellbeing consequences of dietary imbalance, especially for youth, and consider the social, cultural and political factors that influence the food practices of and food choices made by youth. They develop strategies for building health literacy and evaluating nutrition information from various sources, including advertisements and social media.

Youth health and wellbeing

In this area of study students focus on the health and wellbeing of Australia’s youth, and conduct independent research into a selected area of interest. Students identify major health inequalities among Australia’s youth and reflect on the causes. They apply research skills to find out what young people are most focused on and concerned about with regard to health and wellbeing. Students inquire into how governments and organisations develop and implement youth health programs, and consider the use of health data and the influence of community values and expectations. Students select a particular focus area and conduct research, interpret data and draw conclusions on how the health and wellbeing of Australia’s youth can be promoted and improved.

UNIT 2: MANAGING HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENT

AREAS OF STUDY

Developmental transitions

This area of study examines the developmental transitions from youth to adulthood, with a focus on expected changes, significant decisions, and protective factors, including behaviours. Students consider perceptions of what it means to be a youth and an adult and investigate the expected physical and social changes. They inquire into factors that influence both the transition from youth to adulthood and later health status. They consider the characteristics of respectful, healthy relationships. Students examine parenthood as a potential transition in life. With a focus on the influence of parents/carers and families, students investigate factors that contribute to development, health and wellbeing during the prenatal, infancy and early childhood stages of the lifespan. Health and wellbeing is considered as an intergenerational concept (that is, the health and wellbeing of one generation affects the next).

Health care in Australia

This area of study investigates the health system in Australia. Students examine the functions of various entities that play a role in our health system. They inquire into equity of access to health services, as well as the rights and responsibilities of individuals receiving care. Students research the range of health services in their communities and suggest how to improve health and wellbeing outcomes and health literacy in Australia. They explore a range of issues associated with the use of new and emerging health procedures and technologies such as reproductive technologies, artificial intelligence, robotics, nanotechnology, three-dimensional printing of body parts and use of stem cells.

UNIT 3: AUSTRALIA’S HEALTH IN A GLOBALISED WORLD

AREAS OF STUDY

Understanding health and wellbeing

This area of study explores health and wellbeing and illness as complex, dynamic and subjective concepts. While the major focus is on the health of Australians, this area of study also emphasises that Australia’s health is not isolated from the rest of the world. Students inquire into the WHO’s prerequisites for health and wellbeing and reflect on both the universality of public health goals and the increasing influence of global conditions on Australians. Students develop their understanding of the indicators used to measure and evaluate health status, and the factors that contribute to variations between population groups in Australia.

Promoting health and wellbeing

This area of study looks at different approaches to public health over time, with an emphasis on changes and strategies that have succeeded in improving health and wellbeing. Students examine the progression of public health in Australia since 1900, noting global changes and influences such as the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion and the general transition of focus from the health and wellbeing of individuals to that of populations. Students investigate the Australian health system and its role in promoting health and wellbeing. They conduct a detailed study on a successful health promotion campaign or program, and inquire into priorities for health improvements in Australia.

UNIT 4: HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN A GLOBAL CONTEXT

AREAS OF STUDY

Health and wellbeing in a global context

This area of study looks at similarities and differences in major burdens of disease in low- , middle- and high-income countries, including Australia. Students investigate a range of factors that contribute to health inequalities and study the concepts of sustainability, human development and the Human Development Index to further their understanding of health in a global context. Students consider the global reach of product marketing and inquire into the effects of particular global trends on health and wellbeing.

Health and the Sustainable Development Goals

This area of study looks at action for promoting health globally. It looks at the rationale, objectives and interdependencies of the UN’s SDGs, focusing on their promotion of health and wellbeing and human development. Students investigate the priorities and work of the WHO and evaluate Australia’s aid program and the role of non-government organisations, selecting one aid program for detailed research and analysis. They reflect on meaningful and achievable individual actions that could contribute to the work of national and international organisations that promote health and wellbeing.

BIBLICAL PERSPECTIVE

1 Corinthians 6:19 – 20 “Or didn't you realize that your body is a sacred place, the place of the Holy Spirit? Don't you see that you can't live however you please; squandering what God paid such a high price for? The physical part of you is not some piece of property belonging to the spiritual part of you. God owns the whole works. So let people see God in and through your body.” (The Message translation)

The central focus of the Health and Human Development study is to examine the factors that promote wellbeing in individuals, families and the community. This study aims to develop an understanding of the relationship between health and the various aspects of human development. It incorporates the truth that all life originates in God and that our health and wellbeing are important to Him as our Creator. The study explores the physical, social, emotional and mental aspects of health and development, beginning with the individual and progressing to family, local community and finally to the global stage. With the change in values in our society, students will be challenged to assess their responsibilities, and those of the community, in considering God’s word and developing a sense of stewardship and positive interaction for self, family and the community.

This study recognises that health and human development are influenced by lifestyle, environment, behaviour, politics, genetics and many other factors and the way these factors interact. It is hoped that students will learn to analyse and filter the information presented to them in a godly way and begin to use these principles to influence our society.

ASSESSMENT

UNITS 1 & 2

All assessments at Units 1 and 2 are school-based. Procedures for assessment of levels of achievement in Units 1 and 2 are a matter for school decision.

Suitable tasks for assessment in this unit may be selected from the following:

  • A short written report, such as a media analysis, a research inquiry, a blog or a case study analysis
  • Oral presentation, such as a debate or a podcast
  • A visual presentation such as a graphic organiser, a concept/mind map, an annotated poster, a digital presentation
  • Structured questions, including data analysis

UNITS 3

School-assessed Coursework for Unit 3 will contribute 25 % to the study score.

 

UNIT 4

School-assessed Coursework for Unit 4 will contribute 25 % to the study score

EXTERNAL ASSESSMENT

The level of achievement for Units 3 and 4 is also assessed by an end-of-year examination. The examination will contribute 50 %.

 

 

HISTORY [VCE Subject]

OVERVIEW

The study is designed to enable students to:

  • Develop an understanding of change, continuity, causation and evidence over time
  • Acquire a knowledge of how people in different times and cultures have interacted, organised their societies and given meaning to their world
  • Develop the knowledge, concepts and skills to analyse the ways in which the past has been represented visually, orally and in written form
  • Develop skills in responding to historical evidence creatively and critically to make meaning of the pas
  • Acquire a broad historical knowledge, including a historical map within which to locate their detailed studies

CONTENT

UNIT 1: TWENTIETH-CENTURY HISTORY (1918 - 1939)

In Unit 1 students explore the nature of political, social and cultural change in the period between the world wars.

The period after World War One was characterised by significant social and cultural change in the contrasting decades of the 1920s and 1930s. New fascist governments used the military, education and propaganda to impose controls on the way people lived, to exclude particular groups of people and to silence criticism. We will explore Post-War Germany and the rise of Nazism. In Germany, the persecution of the Jewish people became intensified. Writers, artists, musicians, choreographers and filmmakers reflected, promoted or resisted political, economic and social changes.

 

AREAS OF STUDY

Ideology And Conflict

  • What impact did the treaties which concluded World War One have on nations and people?
  • What were the dominant ideologies of the period?
  • What impact did the post-war treaties, the development of ideologies and the economic crisis have on the events leading to World War Two?

Social And Cultural Change

  • What continuity and what change is evident between the 1920s and 1930s in social and cultural life?
  • How did ideologies affect the daily lives of people?
  • How did cultural life both reflect and challenge the prevailing political, economic and social circumstances?

UNIT 2: TWENTIETH-CENTURY HISTORY (1945 – 2000)

In Unit 2 students explore the nature and impact of the Cold War and challenges and changes to existing political, economic and social arrangements in the second half of the twentieth century.

The establishment of the United Nations in 1945 was intended to take an internationalist approach to avoiding warfare, resolving political tensions and addressing threats to human life and safety. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights adopted in 1948 was the first global expression of human rights.

Despite internationalist moves, the second half of the twentieth century was dominated by the competing ideologies of democracy and communism, setting the backdrop for the Cold War.

The period also saw challenge and change to the established order in many countries. The continuation of moves towards decolonisation led to independence movements in former colonies in Africa, the Middle East, Asia and the Pacific. New countries were created and independence was achieved through both military and diplomatic means. Old conflicts also continued and terrorism became increasingly global. The second half of the twentieth century also saw the rise of social movements that challenged existing values and traditions, such as the civil rights movement, feminism and environmental movements.

AREAS OF STUDY

Competing Ideologies

  • What were the causes of the Cold War?
  • What were the key characteristics of the ideologies of communism in the USSR and democracy and capitalism in the USA?
  • What was the impact of the Cold War on nations and people?
  • What led to the end of the Cold War?

Challenge And Change

  • What were the significant causes of challenge to and change in existing political and social orders in the second half of the twentieth century?
  • How did the actions and ideas of popular movements and individuals contribute to change?
  • What impacts did challenge and change have on nations and people?

UNITS 3 AND 4: REVOLUTIONS

In Units 3 and 4 Revolutions students study the Russian Revolution of October 1917, and the Chinese Revolution of 1949.

Students investigate the significant historical causes and consequences of political revolution. Revolutions represent great ruptures in time and are a major turning point which brings about the collapse and destruction of an existing political order resulting in a pervasive change to society. Revolutions are caused by the interplay of ideas, events, individuals and popular movements. Their consequences have a profound effect on the political and social structures of the post-revolutionary society. Revolution is a dramatically accelerated process whereby the new order attempts to create political and social change and transformation based on a new ideology. Progress in a post-revolutionary society is not guaranteed or inevitable. Post-revolutionary regimes are often threatened internally by civil war and externally by foreign threats. These challenges can result in a compromise of revolutionary ideals and extreme measures of violence, oppression and terror.

In these units students develop an understanding of the complexity and multiplicity of causes and consequences in the revolutionary narrative. They construct an argument about the past using primary sources as evidence and evaluate the extent to which the revolution brought change to the lives of people. They consider how perspectives of the revolution give an insight into the continuity and change experienced by those who lived through dramatic revolutionary moments. Students evaluate historical interpretations about the causes and consequences of revolution and the effects of change instigated by the new order.

AREAS OF STUDY

Causes Of Revolution

The Russian Revolution from 1896 to October 1917 (Coronation of Tsar Nicholas to the 25th October Revolution 1917)

The Chinese Revolution from 1912 to 1949 (The Chinese Republic to the Communist victory in the Civil War on the 1 October 1949).

  • What were the significant causes of revolution?
  • How did the actions of popular movements and particular individuals contribute to triggering a revolution?
  • To what extent did social tensions and ideological conflicts contribute to the outbreak of revolution?

RUSSIA

The events and other conditions that contributed to the outbreak of revolution, including tensions in Tsarist Russia, the formation of the Mensheviks and Bolsheviks, the Russo-Japanese War, Bloody Sunday, the role of the Dumas, World War One, the February Revolution, the effectiveness of the Provisional Government, The Dual Authority, Lenin’s return and his April Theses, the July Days, the Kornilov Affair and the events of October 1917.

The ideas that played a significant role in challenging the existing order, including Nationalism, Liberal reformism, Revolutionary Populism, Marxism and Marxist-Leninism.

The role of individuals, including Tsar Nicholas II and Tsarina Alexandra, Count Witte, Pyotr Stolypin, Grigori Rasputin, Alexander Kerensky, Lenin and Trotsky.

The contribution of popular movements in mobilising society and challenging the existing order, including workers’ protests and peasants’ uprisings, soldier and sailor mutinies, and challenges by the Socialist Revolutionaries, Bolsheviks and Mensheviks (SDs), Octoberists and Kadets.

CHINA

The events and other conditions that contributed to the outbreak of revolution, including the economic and social inequalities, challenges to the early Republican era, Warlordism, the First United Front, the Northern Expedition, the Shanghai Massacre, the establishment of the Jiangxi Soviet (Kiangsi Soviet), successes and limitations of the Nationalist Decade, The Long March, the Japanese occupation of Manchuria and the Sino-Japanese War, the Yan’an Soviet (Yenan), the Second United Front, and the Civil War.

The ideas that played a significant role in challenging the existing order, including Marxist-Leninism, Sun Yixian’s (Sun Yat-sen’s) ‘Three Principles of the People’, Nationalism, Chinese Communism and Mao Zedong Thought (Maoism).

The role of individuals, including Yuan Shikai (Yuan Shih-k’ai), Sun Yixian (Sun Yat-sen), Jiang Jieshi (Chiang Kai-shek), Mao Zedong (Mao Tse-tung), Zhu De (Chu Te), and Zhou Enlai (Chou En-lai).

The contribution of popular movements in mobilising society and challenging the existing order, including the New Culture Movement and the May 4th Movement, the New Life Movement, actions of the Red Army, actions of the Goumindang (Kuomintang) and the Chinese Communist Party.

Consequences Of Revolution

The Russian Revolution from October 1917 to 1927 (Early Sovnarkom decrees to the end of the NEP)

The Chinese Revolution from 1949 to 1971 (Communist victory to the death of Lin Biao).

  • How did the consequences of revolution shape the new order?
  • How did the new regime consolidate its power?
  • How did the revolution affect the experiences of those who lived through it?
  • To what extent was society changed and revolutionary ideas achieved?

RUSSIA

The challenges the new regime faced in attempting to consolidate its power, including the dissolution of theConstituent Assembly, political opposition, the creation of the Sovnarkom, land redistribution, the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk, State Capitalism, the Civil War, War Communism, the Red Terror, the Polish Soviet War, the 1921 Famine and the Kronstadt Revolt.

The changes and continuities in political, social, cultural and economic conditions that influenced leaders to compromise their revolutionary ideals, including creation of the Sovnarkom, creation of the CHEKA, issuing of new decrees, State Capitalism, War Communism, the Treaty of Riga, the Tenth Party Congress (introduction of the NEP and Lenin’s ‘On Party Unity’) and the effects of the NEP.

The contribution of significant individuals that changed society including Lenin, Trotsky, Felix Dzerzhinsky and Alexandra Kollontai

The diverse revolutionary experiences of social groups and their responses to the challenges and changes to the conditions of everyday life, including Aristocracy, peasants, Kulaks, workers, bourgeoisie, women and nationalities of the former Russian Empire.

CHINA

The challenges the new regime faced in attempting to consolidate its power, including the new political system, PLA, the implementation of Fanshen, Thought Reform, Sanfan and Wufan, a culture of spying and fear, the First Five-Year Plan and collectivisation and social improvements.

The changes and continuities in political, social, cultural and economic conditions that influenced leaders to compromise their revolutionary ideals, including the nature of political systems, the impacts of mass campaigns, the Hundred Flowers Campaign, The Great Leap Forward, ‘Three Bad Years’ (Famine), The Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution, the Cult of Mao, and the fall of Lin Biao (Lin Piao).

The contribution of significant individuals that changed society, including Mao Zedong (Mao Tse-tung), Zhou Enlai (Chou En-lai), Peng Dehuai (P’eng Te-huai), Lin Biao (Lin Piao), Liu Shaoqi (Liu Shao-ch’i), and Jiang Qing (Chiang Ch’ing).The diverse revolutionary experiences of social groups and their responses to the challenges and changes to the conditions of everyday life, including peasants, women, intellectuals, business owners, workers, CCP Party Members, students and the Red Guards.

 

BIBLICAL PERSPECTIVE

Throughout history God has been working to bring His purposes for man to a conclusion. It is this overall perspective on history, and the salvation which God intends in history, that is central to this course.

In specific terms, students will gain and grow from a Biblical perspective of history by:

  • Identifying how closely linked most of history is to the development of Christian ideas
  • Analysing how Christian values have functioned in many historical settings, compared with other value systems
  • Understanding Christian cultures and communities of the past
  • Learning from the human frailty and misunderstandings of the past
  • Critically comparing non-Christian culture with Christian culture

ASSESSMENT

Units 1 & 2

Assessment tasks over Units 1 and 2 should include the following:

  • A historical inquiry
  • An analysis of primary sources
  • An analysis of historical interpretations
  • An essay

UNIT 3 & 4

School-assessed Coursework for Unit 3 will contribute 25 % to the study score.

School-assessed Coursework for Unit 4 will contribute 25 % to the study score

UNIT 3

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks Aallocated*

 

Outcome 1

Analyse the causes of revolution, and evaluate the contribution of significant ideas, events, individuals and popular movements

Each of the following four assessment tasks must be completed over Units 3 and 4:

  • A historical inquiry
  • An analysis of primary sources
  • An evaluation of historical interpretations
  • An essay

 

Teachers may choose the order of the assessment tasks

50

 

Outcome 2

Analyse the consequences of revolution and evaluate the extent of change brought to society

50

 

TOTAL MARKS

100

 

*School-assessed coursework for Unit 4 contributes 25 % to the study score

UNIT 4

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks Allocated*

Outcome 1

Analyse the causes of revolution, and evaluate the contribution of significant ideas, events, individuals and popular movements

Each of the following four assessment tasks must be completed over Units 3 and 4:

  • A historical inquiry
  • An analysis of primary sources
  • An evaluation of historical interpretations
  • An essay

 

Teachers may choose the order of the assessment tasks.

50

Outcome 2

Analyse the consequences of revolution and evaluate the extent of change brought to society

50

TOTAL MARKS

100

*School-assessed Coursework for Unit 4 contributes 25 %

EXAMINATION

The examination will be set by a panel appointed by the VCAA. All the key knowledge and key skills that underpin the outcomes in Units 3 and 4 are examinable.

 

 

LEGAL STUDIES [VCE Subject]

OVERVIEW

If Christians are to be educated for service and witness in the world, some knowledge of the political and legal systems which seek to control our society is essential. This course introduces students to the Australian legal system with a view to encouraging interest and a sense of Christian responsibility in these fundamental structures of our community.

CONTENT

UNIT 1:  GUILT AND LIABILITY

AREAS OF STUDY

Legal Foundations

This area of study provides students with foundational knowledge of laws and the Australian legal system. Students explore the role of individuals, laws and the legal system in achieving social cohesion and protecting the rights of individuals. Students consider the characteristics of an effective law, and sources and types of law. They examine the relationship between parliament and the courts, and the reasons for a court hierarchy in Victoria, and develop an appreciation of the principles of justice.

The Presumption of Innocence

The presumption of innocence is the fundamental principle of criminal law and provides a guarantee that an accused is presumed innocent until proven guilty beyond reasonable doubt. In this area of study students develop an understanding of key concepts in criminal law and types of crime, and investigate two criminal offences in detail. For each offence, students consider actual and/or hypothetical scenarios in which an accused has been charged with the offence, use legal reasoning to determine possible culpability and explain the impact of the offence on individuals and society.

Civil Liability

Civil law aims to protect the rights of individuals, groups and organisations, and provides opportunities for a wronged party to seek redress for a breach of civil law. In this area of study students develop an understanding of key concepts in civil law and investigate two areas of civil law in detail. Possible areas of civil law could include negligence, defamation, nuisance, trespass and contracts. For each area of civil law, students consider actual and/or hypothetical scenarios giving rise to a civil claim, apply legal reasoning to determine possible liability for a breach of civil law and explain the impact of a breach of civil law on the parties.

UNIT 2:  SANCTIONS, REMEDIES AND RIGHTS

AREAS OF STUDY

Sanctions

The criminal justice system determines the guilt or otherwise of an accused, and imposes sanctions on a guilty person. In this area of study students investigate key concepts in the determination of a criminal case, including the institutions that enforce criminal law, and the purposes and types of sanctions and approaches to sentencing. Through an investigation of two criminal cases from the past four years, either decided or still being decided, students explore the extent to which the principles of justice were or could be achieved.

Remedies

Remedies may be available to a wronged party where there has been a breach of civil law. In this area of study students develop an appreciation of key concepts in the resolution of a civil case, including the methods used and institutions available to resolve disputes, and the purposes and types of remedies. Through an investigation of two civil cases from the past four years, either decided or still being decided, students explore the extent to which the principles of justice were or could be achieved.

Rights

The protection of rights is fundamental to a democratic society. Rights are protected in Australia through the Australian Constitution, the Victorian Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities and through common law and statute law such as through statutes relating to racial discrimination, sex discrimination and equal opportunity. In this area of study students examine the ways in which rights are protected in Australia and compare this approach with that of another country. Based on this comparison, they consider possible reforms to the ways rights are protected in Australia. Students investigate an Australian case that had an impact on the protection of rights in Australia and develop their understanding of the role of an individual in taking a case to court.

UNIT 3:  RIGHTS AND JUSTICE

AREAS OF STUDY

The Victorian Criminal Justice System

The Victorian criminal justice system is used to determine whether an accused person is guilty beyond reasonable doubt of an offence for which they are charged, and to impose sanctions where guilt has been found or pleaded. The system involves a range of institutions including courts (the Magistrates’ Court, County Court and Supreme Court) and others available to assist an accused. In this area of study students explore the criminal justice system, its range of personnel and institutions and the various means it uses to determine a criminal case. Students investigate the rights of the accused and of victims, and explore the purposes and types of sanctions and sentencing considerations. Students consider factors that affect the ability of the criminal justice system to achieve the principles of justice. They examine recent reforms from the past four years and recommended reforms to enhance the ability of the criminal justice system to achieve the principles of justice. Students synthesise and apply legal principles and information relevant to the criminal justice system to actual and/or hypothetical scenarios.

The Victorian Civil Justice System

The Victorian civil justice system aims to restore a wronged party to the position they were originally in before the breach of civil law occurred. The system involves a range of institutions to resolve a civil dispute, including courts (the Magistrates’ Court, County Court and Supreme Court), complaints bodies and tribunals. In this area of study students consider the factors relevant to commencing a civil claim, examine the institutions and methods used to resolve a civil dispute and explore the purposes and types of remedies. Students consider factors that affect the ability of the civil justice system to achieve the principles of justice. They examine recent reforms from the past four years and recommended reforms to enhance the ability of the civil justice system to achieve the principles of justice. Students synthesise and apply legal principles and information relevant to the civil justice system to actual and/or hypothetical scenarios.

UNIT 4: THE PEOPLE AND THE LAW

AREAS OF STUDY

The People and the Australian Consititution

The Australian Constitution establishes Australia’s parliamentary system and provides mechanisms to ensure that parliament does not make laws beyond its powers. In this area of study students examine the relationship between the Australian people and the Australian Constitution and the ways in which the Australian Constitution acts as a check on parliament in law-making. Students investigate the involvement of the Australian people in the referendum process and the role of the High Court in acting as the guardian of the Australian Constitution.

The People, the Parliament and the Courts

Parliament is the supreme law-making body, and courts have a complementary role to parliament in making laws. Courts can make laws through the doctrine of precedent and through statutory interpretation when determining cases. In this area of study students investigate factors that affect the ability of parliament and courts to make law. They examine the relationship between parliament and courts in law-making and consider the capacity of both institutions to respond to the need for law reform. In exploring the influences on law reform, students draw on examples of individuals and the media, as well as examples from the past four years of law reform bodies recommending legislative change.

BIBLICAL PERSPECTIVE

Legal Studies aims to:

  • Cultivate a reasoned and compassionate outlook on social and political behaviour based on Christian principles
  • Encourage a responsibility to, and involvement in, political and social activity which effectively promotes Biblical values while respecting the rights, opinions and interpretations of others
  • Show the difficulties involved in applying God’s absolute standards to a world corrupted by sin to recognise, as a consequence, that sometimes the choice is not between good and evil but a matter of choosing the lesser of two evils
  • Promote an appreciation of the fact that there may be a number of alternative means, political legal and social, of achieving the implementation of  Biblical principles

ASSESSMENT

UNITS 1 & 2

Assessment tasks are selected from:

  • Structured assignment
  • Essay
  • Mock court or role-play
  • Folio and report
  • Case study
  • Test
  • Report (written, visual, oral or multimedia)

UNIT 3

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks Allocated*

Outcome 1

Explain the rights of the accused and of victims in the criminal justice system, discuss the means used to determine criminal cases and evaluate the ability of the criminal justice system to achieve the principles of justice.

The student’s performance on each outcome will be assessed using one or more of the following:

  • A case study
  • Structured questions
  • A test
  • An essay
  • A report in written format
  • A report in multimedia format
  • A folio of exercises

50

Outcome 2

Analyse the factors to consider when initiating a civil claim, discuss the institutions and methods used to resolve civil disputes and evaluate the ability of the civil justice system to achieve the principles of justice

50

TOTAL MARKS

100

*School-assessed coursework for Unit 3 contributes 25 % to the study score

UNIT 4

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks Allocated*

Outcome 1

Discuss the significance of High Court cases involving the interpretation of the Australian Constitution and evaluate the ways in which the Australian Constitution acts as a check on parliament in law-making

The student’s performance on each outcome will be assessed using one or more of the following:

  • A case study
  • Structured questions
  • A test
  • An essay
  • A report in written format
  • A report in multimedia format
  • A folio of exercises

40

Outcome 2

Discuss the factors that affect the ability of parliament and courts to make law, evaluate the ability of these law-makers to respond to the need for law reform, and analyse how individuals, the media and law reform bodies can influence a change in the law.

60

TOTAL MARKS

100

*School-assessed coursework for Unit 4 contributes 25% to the study score

 

 

LITERATURE [VCE Subject]

OVERVIEW

Literature is designed to enable students to:

  • Develop an enjoyment  of literature  through reading widely, imaginatively, critically and independently;
  • Gain an understanding of the variety of human experience;
  • Develop a critical awareness of cultures past and present, as they are represented in literature;
  • Read closely and engage in detailed critical analysis of the key literary features;
  • Develop interpretive skills by hypothesising about and drawing inferences from texts;
  • Extend their understanding of the different ways literary texts are constructed;
  • Reflect on their interpretations and evaluate others' interpretations and measure these against biblical perspectives
  • Develop the capacity to write confident analytical and creative responses to texts.

CONTENT

UNIT 1

AREAS OF STUDY

Reading Practices

In this   Area of Study students consider how language, structure and stylistic choices are used in different literary forms and types of text. They consider both print and non-print texts, reflecting on the  contributions of form and style to meaning. Students reflect on the degree to which points of view, experiences and contexts shape responses to text. They engage with other views about texts and develop an awareness of how these views may influence and enhance their own reading of a text. They develop an awareness of initial readings of texts against more considered and complex  responses to texts.

Ideas and concerns in texts

In this  Area of Study students investigate the ideas and concerns raised in texts and the ways social and cultural contexts are represented. They consider how texts may reflect or comment on the interests of individuals and particular groups in society and how texts may support or question particular aspects of society. Students learn to select and discuss aspects of the texts that facilitate their interpretation and understanding of the  points of view being presented. They consider those facets of human experience that are seen as important within the texts and those that are ignored or disputed. They examine the ways texts explore different aspects of the human condition.

UNIT 2

AREAS OF STUDY

The text, the reader and their contexts

In this   Area of Study students focus on the interrelationships between the text, readers and their social and cultural contexts. Students reflect upon their own backgrounds and experience in developing responses to texts from a past era and/or another culture. Students explore the text to understand its point of view and what it reflects or comments on. They identify the language and the representations in the text that reflect the period or culture, its ideas and concepts. Students develop an understanding that contextual meaning is already implicitly or explicitly inscribed in a text and that textual details and structures can be scrutinised to illustrate its significance. They examine and reflect on how the reader’s interpretation is influenced by what they bring to the text. Students develop the ability to analyse language closely, recognising that words have historical and cultural import.

Exploring connections between texts

In this  Area of Study students focus on the ways that texts relate to and influence each other. Students learn that meanings of texts are evolving and open to a range of interpretations and change in relation to other texts. Students consider how the reading of a text can change according to the form of the text and its context. They investigate and analyse how different interpretations of texts are influenced by language features and structures.

UNIT 3

AREAS OF STUDY

Adaptations and Transformations

In this  Area of Study students focus on how the form of text contributes to the meaning of the text. Students develop an understanding of the typical features of a particular form of text and how the conventions associated with it are used, such as the use of imagery and rhythm in a poem or the use of setting, plot and narrative voice in a novel. Students use this understanding to reflect upon the extent to which changing the form of the text affects its meaning. By exploring adaptations, students also consider how creators of adaptations may emphasise or understate perspectives, assumptions and ideas in their presentation of a text.

Creative Responses to Texts

In this  Area of Study students focus on the imaginative techniques used for creating and recreating a literary work. Students use their knowledge of how the meaning of texts can change as form changes to construct their own creative transformations of texts. They learn how writers develop images of people and places, and they develop an understanding of language, voice, form and structure. Students draw inferences from the original text and speculate about the writer's purpose. In their adaptation of the tone and the style of the original text, students develop an understanding of the concerns and attitudes explored.

UNIT 4

AREAS OF STUDY

Literary Perspectives

In this  Area of Study students focus on how different readings of texts may reflect the views and values of both writer and reader. Students consider the ways in which various interpretations of texts can contribute to understanding. They compare and analyse  pieces of literary criticism reflecting different perspectives, assumptions and ideas about the views and values of the text studied. Students identify the issues, ideas and contexts writers choose to explore, the way these are represented in the text/s and the cultural, social, historical and ideological contexts in which they were created. Students enquire into the ways readers may arrive at differing interpretations about a text and the  grounds on which they are developed. Through close attention to two pieces of literary criticism reflecting different perspectives, students develop their own response to a text.

Close Analysis

In this  Area of Study students focus on detailed scrutiny of the language, style, concerns and construction of texts. Students attend closely to textual details to examine the ways specific features and/or passages in a text contributes to their overall interpretations. Students consider features of texts including structure, context, ideas, images, characters and situations, and the language in which these are expressed. They develop their interpretations using detailed reference to the text, logical sequencing of ideas and persuasive language.

BIBLICAL PERSPECTIVE

Competence in language, both written and oral, is of vital importance if students are to become effective communicators of the Gospel. However, Christian students need to develop basic skills not only to communicate the truth, but also to discern truth. Students must be able to comprehend and analyse what they are reading and to be able to clearly explain and justify their responses.

Through the study of literature, various social values are examined from a Biblical perspective. Common issues which arise and are explored may include:

  • wealth and poverty
  • the family
  • relationships
  • suffering and adversity
  • race relations; discrimination
  • the spiritual aspect of man's personality
  • ambition and aspirations
  • sanity and insanity

In addition, Literature aims to extend the students' appreciation of the beauty and goodness which exists in God's world. Literature has an important role to play in the development of the students' understanding of themselves and the world, and is a valuable tool in discussions on the nature of man and our Christian responsibility to God and His  Creation.

ASSESSMENT

UNIT 1 and 2

Tasks for assessment in these unit are selected from:

  • Essay (comparative, interpretive, analytical or discursive)
  • Debate
  • Journal entries
  • Close analysis of selected passages
  • An original piece of writing responding to a text(s) studied
  • Oral or written review
  • Multimedia presentation
  • Participation in an online discussion
  • Performance and commentary

UNIT 3

Outcomes

Assessment tasks

Marks Allocated*

Outcome 1

Analyse the extent to which meaning changes when a text is adapted to a different form

An analysis of how the form of a text influences meaning. Students may:

  • compare a dramatised version of a scene or scenes from a text with the original text
  • compare a print text with the text's adaptation into another form
  • compare the performance of either a substantial individual text or group of texts with the original text

50

Outcome 2

Respond creatively to a text and comment on the connections between the text and the response

A creative response to a text. Students may:

  • submit an original piece of writing, presented in a manner
  • consistent with the style and context of the original text
  • re-create or rework an aspect of the text, such as adding to the text, recasting a part of the text in another setting or form, or presenting an episode in the text from another point of view.

AND

Students must submit:

  • A reflective commentary establishing connections with the original text.

40

 

 

 

 

 

 

10

TOTAL MARKS

100

*School-assessed coursework for Unit 3 contributes 25 % to the study score

UNIT 4

Outcomes

Assessment tasks

Marks Allocated*

Outcome 1

Produce an interpretation of a text using different literary perspectives to inform their view

A written interpretation of a text using two different perspectives to inform their response

50

Outcome 2

Analyse features of texts and develop and justify interpretations of texts

Task 1

A written interpretation of a text, upported by close textual analysis.

 

AND

 

Task 2

A written interpretation of a different text from Task 1, supported by close textual analysis.

 

Students may:

  • Select and discuss the role and significance of particular sections of a text in interpreting the text as a whole
  • Analyse how certain literary features contribute to an interpretation of a text
  • Analyse the linkages, parallels and contrasts between different passages from a text

40

10

 

TOTAL MARKS

100

*School-assessed coursework for Unit 4 contributes 25 % to the study score

 

 

 

LOTE CHINESE [VCE Subject]

OVERVIEW

The study of a language other than English contributes to the overall education of students, most particularly in the area of communication, but also in the areas of cross-cultural understanding, intercultural learning, cognitive development, literacy and general knowledge. It provides access to the culture of communities which use the language and promotes understanding of different attitudes and values within the wider Australian community and beyond.

The ability to communicate in another language, in conjunction with other skills, may provide opportunities for employment in the fields of interpreting, social services, ethnic affairs, the tourism and hospitality industries, international relations, the arts, commerce, technology, science and education.

This study is designed to enable students to:

  • Use Chinese to communicate with others
  • Understand and appreciate the cultural contexts in which Chinese is used
  • Understand their own culture(s) through the study of other cultures
  • Understand language as a system
  • Make connections between Chinese and English, and/or other languages
  • Apply Chinese to work, further study, training or leisure

CONTENT

UNITS 1- 4 AREAS OF STUDY

Three Themes

  • The Individual
  • The Chinese-Speaking Communities
  • The World around us

Nine Topics

  • Personal identity
  • Relationships
  • Education and aspirations
  • History and culture
  • Arts and entertainment
  • Living in a Chinese-speaking community
  • Global and contemporary society
  • Communication and media
  • The influence of science and technology

Text Types

The student will be expected to be familiar with the various text types. The student is expected to be familiar with, and be able to produce, the following five kinds of writing: Personal, Imaginative, Persuasive, Informative and Evaluative.

BIBLICAL PERSPECTIVE

Competence in language, both written and oral, is of vital importance in communicating the gospel. The study of a LOTE should be more than simply memorizing words and structures, especially from a Christian perspective. Effective communication in a second language takes place when there is a relationship based on levels of empathy and feelings allowing social discussion to effectively take place. Being familiar with phrases, structures, text types and appropriate relationship building strategies, allows us to join communicatively in God’s big vision of impacting people and communities, and seeking and saving the lost.

The common worldwide issues we explore in VCE Chinese include: relationships, personal opinions and values, lifestyles, customs and traditions, as well as social and environmental change. Studying these topics and themes will further increase our students’ understanding of our responsibility to God and others in His world.

ASSESSMENT

UNITS 1 & 2

Students will be expected to be familiar with various text types for written and oral assessment.

Text types will be selected from the following:

  • Advertisement
  • Article
  • Conversation
  • Discussion
  • Email
  • Editorial
  • Formal letter
  • Interview script
  • Invitation
  • Journal entry
  • Play/role play
  • Review
  • Recipe
  • Report
  • Song
  • Speech
  • Story
   

UNITS 1

For Outcomes 1, 2 and 3

  • Participate in a conversation, interview or role-play
  • Give a talk to the class about selected topic, asking and answering questions
  • Write a descriptive summary of a film including information from a review of the film
  • Listen to a conversation and view a map to write directions
  • Read an article and listen to an announcement to write instructions.
  • Create a written presentation which may include pictures; this may be supported by media
  • Write an imaginative children’s story.
  • Write a personal answer to an email

UNITS 2

For Outcomes 1, 2 and 3

  • Write an informative blog in response to texts
  • Respond in a written letter to a radio announcement or editorial
  • Describe in writing an experience seen from different perspectives
  • Write a reflective article on a cultural insight, such as the attitudes of Chinese-speaking people in Australia and elsewhere to traditional customs
  • Evaluate opposing arguments put forward on an issue, such as attitudes to health or the long-term impact of social media on society
  • Narrate a life story, event or incident that highlights an aspect of culture
  • Tell the class a personal or reflective story about a cultural event
  • Present and explain an aspect of culture referring to a portfolio or a PowerPoint presentation.

UNITS 3 & 4

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks Allocated*

Unit 3

Outcome 1

Participate in a spoken exchange in Chinese to resolve a personal issue.

 

Outcome 2

Interpret information from texts and write responses in Chinese.

 

Outcome 3

Express ideas in a personal, informative or imaginative piece of writing in Chinese.

 

Unit 4

Outcome 1

Share information, ideas and opinions in a spoken exchange in Chinese.

 

Outcome 2

Analyse information from written, spoken and viewed texts for use in a written response in Chinese.

 

Units 3 and 4

Present information, concepts and ideas in evaluative or persuasive writing on an issue in Chinese.

A three- to four-minute role-play, focusing on negotiating a solution to a personal issue.

10

Responses to specific questions or instructions using information extracted from written, spoken and viewed texts on the selected subtopic.

7.5

An approximately 200-character personal, informative or imaginative piece of writing.

7.5

A two- to three-minute interview providing information and responding to questions about a cultural product

or practice.

10

An approximately 150 character written response for a specific audience and purpose, incorporating information from three or more texts.

7.5

An approximately 300-character evaluative or persuasive piece of writing.

7.5

Conversation

Discussion

12.5

Listening & Responding

Part A: Response in English

7.5

Part B: Response in Chinese

7.5

Reading & Responding

Part A: Response in English

10

Part B: Response in Chinese

5

Writing

7.5

TOTAL MARKS                    

100

*School-assessed coursework for Unit 3 contributes 25 % to the study score

*School-assessed coursework for Unit 4 contributes 25 % to the study score

 

 

LOTE FRENCH [VCE Subject]

OVERVIEW

The study of a language other than English contributes to the overall education of students, most particularly in the area of communication, but also in the areas of cross-cultural understanding, intercultural learning, cognitive development, literacy and general knowledge. It provides access to the culture of communities which use the language and promotes understanding of different attitudes and values within the wider Australian community and beyond.

The ability to communicate in another language, in conjunction with other skills, may provide opportunities for employment in the fields of interpreting, social services, ethnic affairs, the tourism and hospitality industries, international relations, the arts, commerce, technology, science and education.

This study is designed to enable students to:

  • Use French to communicate with others
  • Understand and appreciate the cultural contexts in which French is used
  • Understand their own culture(s) through the study of other cultures
  • Make connections between French and English, and/or other languages
  • Apply French to work, further study, training or leisure

CONTENT

UNITS 1 & 2

AREAS OF STUDY

The Individual

Personal identity and lifestyles

Relationships

Aspirations, education and careers

The French-Speaking Communities

The Francophone world

Historical perspectives

French cultural perspectives

The world around us

Global and contemporary society

Communication and media

Technology and science

Text Types

The student will be expected to be familiar with the various text types. The student is expected to be familiar with, and be able to produce, the following five kinds of writing: Personal, Imaginative, Persuasive, Informative and Evaluative.

LEVELS OF ACHIEVEMENT

Unit 1 and 2

  • Individual school decision on levels of achievement

Prerequisites

  • French Year 9 and/or 10

UNIT 3

AREAS OF STUDY

The three outcomes for Unit 3 are to:

  • Participate in a spoken exchange in French to resolve a personal issue
  • Interpret information from texts and write responses in French
  • Express ideas in a personal, informative or imaginative piece of writing in French

UNIT 4

AREAS OF STUDY

The three outcomes for Unit 4 are to:

  • Share information, ideas and opinions in a spoken exchange in French
  • Analyse information from written, spoken and viewed texts for use in a written response in French
  • Present information, concepts and ideas in evaluative or persuasive writing on an issue in French.

ASSESSMENT

  • Satisfactory Completion
  • Demonstrated achievement of the set of outcomes specified for the unit.

LEVELS OF ACHIEVEMENT

Unit 3 & 4

School-assessed coursework and end-of-year examinations:

  • Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 25 %
  • Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 25 %
  • Examinations: oral component (Detailed study + General conversation) 12.5 %
  • Examinations: written component 37.5 %

Prerequisites

  • French Year 10 and/or 11

BIBLICAL PERSPECTIVE

Competence in language, both written and oral, is of vital importance in communicating the gospel. The study of a LOTE should be more than simply memorizing words and structures, especially from a Christian perspective. Effective communication in a second language takes place when there is a relationship based on levels of empathy and feelings allowing social discussion to effectively take place. Being familiar with phrases, structures, text types and appropriate relationship building strategies, allows us to join communicatively in God’s big vision of impacting people and communities, and seeking and saving the lost.

The common worldwide issues we explore in VCE French include: relationships, personal opinions and values, lifestyles, customs and traditions, as well as social and environmental change. Studying these topics and themes will further increase our students’ understanding of our responsibility to God and others in His world.

ASSESSMENT

UNITS 1 & 2

Students will be expected to be familiar with various text types for written and oral assessment.

Text types will be selected from the following:

  • Advertisement
  • Article
  • Conversation
  • Discussion
  • Email
  • Editorial
  • Formal letter
  • Interview script
  • Invitation
  • Journal entry
  • Role play
  • Review
  • Recipe
  • Report
  • Song
  • Speech
  • Story
   

UNITS 1 & 2

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks Allocated*

UNIT 1

Outcome 1

Exchange meaning in a spoken interaction in french.

 

Outcome 2

Interpret information from two texts on the same subtopic presented in french, and respond in writing in french and in english.

 

Outcome 3

Present information, concepts and ideas in writing in french on the selected subtopic and for a specific audience and purpose.

 

UNIT 2

Outcome 1

Respond in writing in french to spoken, written or visual texts presented in french.

 

Outcome 2

Analyse and use information from written, spoken or visual texts to produce an extended written response in french.

 

Outcome 3

Explain information, ideas and concepts orally in french to a specific audience about an aspect of culture within communities where french is spoken.

• Participate in a conversation, interview or role-play

or

• Give a talk to the class about the selected subtopic, asking and answering questions.

15

• Write a descriptive summary of a film including information from a review of the film

or

• Listen to a conversation and view a map to write directions

or

• Read an article and listen to an announcement to write instructions.

10

• Create a written presentation which may include pictures; this may be supported by media such as Photo Story or PowerPoint

or

• Write an imaginative children’s story.

10

• Write a personal answer to an email

or

• Write an informative blog in response to texts

or

• Respond in a written letter to a radio announcement or editorial.

10

• Describe in writing an experience seen from different perspectives

or

• Write a reflective article on a cultural insight, such as the attitudes of French-speaking people in Australia and elsewhere to traditional customs

or

• Evaluate opposing arguments put forward on an issue, such as attitudes to health or the long-term impact of social media on society.

10

• Narrate a life story, event or incident that highlights an aspect of culture

or

• Tell the class a personal or reflective story about a cultural event

or

• Present and explain an aspect of culture, referring to a portfolio or a PowerPoint presentation.

15

End of Year Written examination

30

TOTAL MARKS

100

UNITS 3 & 4

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks Allocated*

UNIT 3

Outcome 1

Participate in a spoken exchange in French to resolve a personal issue.

 

Outcome 2

Interpret information from texts and write responses in French.

 

Outcome 3

Express ideas in a personal, informative or imaginative piece of writing in French.

 

UNIT 4

Outcome 1

Share information, ideas and opinions in a spoken exchange in French.

 

Outcome 2

Analyse information from written, spoken and viewed texts for use in a written response in French.

 

Outcome 3

Present information, concepts and ideas in evaluative or persuasive writing on an issue in French.

 

UNITS 3 & 4

End of Year Oral examination

End of Year Written examination

A three- to four-minute role-play, focusing on

negotiating a solution to a personal issue.

20

A response to specific questions, messages or instructions, extracting and using the information requested

15

An approximately 250-word personal, informative or

imaginative piece of writing.

15

A three- to four-minute interview providing information

and responding to questions about a cultural product

or practice.

20

An approximately 250-word written response for

a specific audience and purpose, incorporating

information from three or more texts.

15

An approximately 300-word evaluative or persuasive

piece of writing

15

Conversation

Discussion

12.5

SECTION 1

Part A – Listening and responding in English

Part B – Listening and responding in French

 

SECTION 2

Part A – Reading, listening and responding in English

Part B – Reading and responding in French

 

SECTION 3

Writing in French

37.5

 

TOTAL MARKS

100

 

 

MATHEMATICS [VCE Subject]

OVERVIEW

Mathematics provides us with many insights into the order of God’s Creation. Physical, biological and economic laws are expressed by explaining that derived functions of quantity behave in a particular way. The study of Mathematics seeks to discover more of God’s wonder by developing an understanding of the predictability of the created world.

Furthermore, since all students will utilise mathematical concepts to differing degrees in their professional and social lives, they should develop a mutual respect for the differing levels of mathematical gifting apparent within the classroom. Group work is undertaken in many problem solving tasks and in project work in order to enhance this appreciation.

ASSESSMENT

UNITS 1 & 2 (All Mathematics Subjects)

Assessment tasks are selected from:

  • Assignments
  • Tests
  • Projects
  • Short written responses
  • Problem-solving tasks
  • Modelling tasks
  • Effective and appropriate use of technology

UNITS 3 & 4

Students will be assessed as follows:

Further Mathematics

  • Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 20 %
  • Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 14 %
  • Units 3 and 4 examination 1: 33 % (duration 90 minutes)
  • Units 3 and 4 examination 2: 33 % (duration 90 minutes)

Mathematical Methods

  • Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 17 %
  • Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 17 %
  • Units 3 and 4 examination 1: 22 % (duration 60 minutes)
  • Units 3 and 4 examination 2: 44 % (duration 120 minutes)

Examination 1 for Mathematical Methods Units 3 and 4 is a technology-free examination. Examination 2 is a technology-enabled examination

Specialist Mathematics

  • Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 17 %
  • Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 17 %
  • Units 3 and 4 examination 1: 22 % (duration 60 minutes)
  • Units 3 and 4 examination 2: 44 % (duration 120 minutes)

Examination 1 for Specialist Mathematics Units 3 and 4 is a technology-free examination. Examination 2 is a technology-enabled examination

Please note the following:

  • Specialist Mathematics Units 3 and 4 must be studied in conjunction with Mathematical Methods Units 3 and 4, not in isolation. It will offer certain students the maximum possible depth of mathematics tuition for entry into specialised tertiary courses.
  • Specialist Mathematics Units 1 and 2 must be studied in conjunction with Mathematical Methods Units 1 and 2.
  • Mathematical Methods Units 3 and 4 cannot be undertaken without Mathematical Methods Units 1 and 2 having been previously completed.
  • Students who only take Units 1 and 2 of General Mathematics may be eligible for some tertiary courses which require two units of mathematics (eg. Physical Education). Students who subsequently progress to Units 3 and 4 of Further Mathematics will have a broader range of tertiary course options.

 

 

MATHEMATICS: General Mathematics Units 1 & 2 [VCE Subject]

OVERVIEW

General Mathematics provides courses of study for a broad range of students and may be implemented in a number of ways. Some students will not study Mathematics beyond Units 1 and 2, while others will intend to study Further Mathematics Units 3 and 4. Others will also be studying Mathematics Methods Units 1 and 2 and intend to study Mathematical Methods Units 3 and 4 as well.

CONTENT

AREAS OF STUDY

  • Arithmetic and Number: Financial Arithmetic
  • Statistics: Analysis of univariate or bivariate data
  • Algebra and Structure: Linear relations and equations
  • Graphs of linear and non-linear relations
  • Discrete Mathematics: Matrices, Graphs and Networks,Number patterns and recursion
  • Geometry, measurement and trigonometry

Units 1 and 2 are constructed to suit the range of students entering the study by selecting material from the six areas of study using the following rules:

  • Courses intended to provide preparation for study at the Units 3 and 4 level include a selection of material from areas of study which provide a suitable background for these studies
  • Selected material from an area of study provide a clear progression in key knowledge and key skills from Unit 1 to Unit 2

The appropriate use of technology to support and develop the teaching and learning of mathematics is incorporated throughout the course.

There are no prerequisites for entry to General Mathematics Units 1 and 2. However, students attempting General Mathematics are expected to have a sound background in number, algebra and functions. Enrolment without satisfactory completion of these studies is subject to approval.

 

 

MATHEMATICS: Mathematical Methods Units 1 & 2 [VCE Subject]

OVERVIEW

Mathematical Methods is designed to provide access to worthwhile and challenging mathematical learning in a way which takes into account the needs and aspirations of a wide range of students. It is also designed to promote students’ awareness of the importance of mathematics in everyday life in a technological society, and confidence in making effecting use of mathematical ideas, techniques and processes.

Units 1 and 2 each deal with specific content and are designed to enable students to achieve a set of outcomes.

Students attempting Mathematical Methods are expected to have a sound background in algebra, function, and graphs, calculus probability and statistics.

Some additional preparatory work will be advisable for any student who is undertaking Mathematical Methods Units 1 and 2 without meeting a satisfactory standard of Year 10 Mathematics.

CONTENT

AREAS OF STUDY

  • Functions and graphs
  • Algebra
  • Calculus
  • Probability and statistics

The appropriate use of Computer Algebra Systems (CAS) technology via a hand-held calculator to support and develop the teaching and learning of mathematics is incorporated throughout the course.

Mathematical Methods Units 1 and 2 are designed as preparation for Mathematical Methods Units 3 and 4, and must be satisfactorily completed before Units 3 and 4 are commenced.

 

 

MATHEMATICS: Specialist Mathematics Units 1 & 2 [VCE Subject]

OVERVIEW

Specialist Mathematics is designed to provide a course of study for students who wish to undertake an in-depth study of mathematics, with an emphasis on concepts, skills and processes related to mathematical structure, modeling, problem solving and reasoning. This study has a focus on interest in the discipline of mathematics in its own right and investigation of a broad range of applications, as well as development of a sound background for further studies in mathematics and mathematics related fields.

Each unit deals with specific content and is designed to enable students to achieve a set of outcomes.

Enrolment in Specialist Mathematics Units 1 and 2 assumes a current enrolment in, or previous completion of Mathematical Methods Units 1 and 2.

CONTENT

AREAS OF STUDY

  • Number systems and recursion
  • Geometry in the plane and proof
  • Vectors in the plane
  • Graphs of non-linear relations
  • Transformations, trigonometry and matrices
  • Principles of counting
  • Kinematics
  • Simulations, sampling and sampling distributions

The appropriate use of technology to support and develop the teaching and learning of mathematics is to be incorporated throughout the units. In particular, students are required to use CAS calculators and other technologies both in the learning of new material and the application of this material in a variety of different contexts.

 

 

MATHEMATICS: Further Mathematics Units 3 & 4 [VCE Subject]

OVERVIEW

Further Mathematics is designed to provide access to worthwhile and challenging mathematical learning in a way which takes into account the needs and aspirations of a wide range of students. It is also designed to promote students’ awareness of the importance of mathematics in everyday life in a technological society, and confidence in making effecting use of mathematical ideas, techniques and processes.

Each unit deals with specific content and is designed to enable students to achieve a set of outcomes. Each outcome is described in terms of key knowledge and skills.

CONTENT

AREAS OF STUDY

CORE

  • Data analysis
  • Recursion and financial modelling

APPLICATIONS

  • Matrices
  • Networks and decision mathematics

Assumed knowledge and skills for Further Mathematics Units 3 and 4 are drawn from General Mathematics Units 1 and 2. Students who have completed only Mathematical Methods Units 1 and 2 will have limited knowledge and skills in some content relevant to Further Mathematics. Some additional preparatory work will be necessary for any student who decides to undertake Further Mathematics Unit 3 & 4 without completing General Mathematics Units 1 & 2.

The assumed knowledge and skills for the Core areas of study are contained in the topics: Investigating and comparing distributions, Investigating relationships between two variables, Linear graphs and modeling, Linear equations and relations, Number Patterns and Recursion and Computation & Practical Arithmetic topics from General Mathematics Units 1 and 2.

Relevant skills for the Modules chosen at the College are contained in the topics: Matrices and Graphs and Networks topics from General Mathematics Units 1 and 2.

The appropriate use of Computer Algebra Systems (CAS) technology via a hand-held calculator to support and develop the teaching and learning of mathematics, and in related assessments, is incorporated throughout the course.

 

 

MATHEMATICS: Mathematics Methods Units 3 & 4 [VCE Subject]

OVERVIEW

Mathematical Methods is designed to provide access to worthwhile and challenging mathematical learning in a way which takes into account the needs and aspirations of a wide range of students. It is also designed to promote students’ awareness of the importance of mathematics in everyday life in a technological society, and confidence in making effecting use of mathematical ideas, techniques and processes.

Units 3 and 4 each unit deal with specific content and are designed to enable students to achieve a set of outcomes. Each outcome is described in terms of key knowledge and skills.

Students must undertake Unit 3 prior to undertaking Unit 4.

CONTENT

AREAS OF STUDY

  • Functions and graphs
  • Algebra
  • Calculus
  • Probability and statistics

Assumed knowledge and skills for Mathematical Methods Units 3 and 4 are contained in Mathematical Methods Units 1 and 2.

The appropriate use of Computer Algebra Systems (CAS) technology via a hand-held calculator to support and develop the teaching and learning of mathematics, and in related assessments, is incorporated throughout the course.

 

 

MATHEMATICS: Specialist Mathematics Units 3 & 4 [VCE Subject]

OVERVIEW

Specialist Mathematics is designed to provide access to worthwhile and challenging mathematical learning in a way which takes into account the needs and aspirations of a select group of students. It is also designed to promote students’ awareness of the importance of mathematics in everyday life in a technological society, and confidence in making effective use of mathematical ideas, techniques and processes.

Each unit deals with specific content and is designed to enable students to achieve a set of outcomes.

Enrolment in Specialist Mathematics Units 3 and 4 assumes a current enrolment in, or previous completion of Mathematical Methods Units 3 and 4.

In addition, students attempting Specialist Mathematics Units 3 and 4 are expected to have successfully completed Specialist Mathematics Units 1 and 2.

CONTENT

AREAS OF STUDY

  • Functions and graphs
  • Algebra
  • Calculus
  • Vectors
  • Mechanics
  • Probability and statistics

The appropriate use of technology to support and develop the teaching and learning of mathematics is to be incorporated throughout the units. In particular, students are required to use CAS calculators and other technologies both in the learning of new material and the application of this material in a variety of different contexts.

SPECIAL NOTE FOR MATHEMATICS STUDIES

Various combinations of units are possible. Students should be guided by their Mathematics teachers and select units very carefully. In addition, the careers adviser should be consulted in order to determine pre-requisites for further courses of study. The standard sequences of mathematics which can be studied are as follows:

Please note the following:

  • Please note that General Mathematics and Specialist Mathematics cannot BOTH be undertaken as separate subjects. They are both different expressions of the same subject, designed to cater for different student needs. Therefore only one can be undertaken for the purposes of VCE subject accreditation.
  • Specialist Mathematics Units 3 and 4 must be studied in conjunction with Mathematical Methods Units 3 and 4, not in isolation. It will offer certain students the maximum possible depth of mathematics tuition for entry into specialised tertiary courses.
  • Specialist Mathematics Units 1 and 2 must be studied in conjunction with Mathematical Methods Units 1 and 2.
  • Specialist Maths
  • Mathematical Methods Units 3 and 4 cannot be undertaken without Mathematical Methods Units 1 and 2 having been previously completed.
  • Students who only take Units 1 and 2 of General Mathematics may be eligible for some tertiary courses which require two units of mathematics (eg. Physical Education). Students who subsequently progress to Units 3 and 4 of Further Mathematics will have a broader range of tertiary course options

 

 

MEDIA [VCE Subject]

OVERVIEW

We interact with the media every day, and the way we use the media is always changing. The media influences the way in which people spend their time and how people perceive themselves and others, both positively and negatively. This study encourages students to analyse and evaluate media products, production processes and policies through studying media forms which include traditional media forms such as radio, film, print media and television, as well as digital and social media. This study encourages students to consider the media they consume and create with greater intentionality and thoughtfulness.

CONTENT

UNIT 1: MEDIA FORMS, REPRESENTATIONS AND AUSTRALIAN STORIES

In this unit, students develop an understanding of audiences and the core concepts underpinning the construction of representations and meaning in different media forms. They explore media codes and conventions and the construction of meaning in media products. Students analyse how representations, narrative and media codes and conventions contribute to the construction of the media realities audiences engage with and read. Students gain an understanding of audiences as producers and consumers of media products. They develop research skills to investigate and analyse selected narratives focusing on the influence of media professionals on production genre and style. Students develop an understanding of the features of Australian fictional and non-fictional narratives in different media forms. Students work in a range of media forms and develop and produce representations to demonstrate an understanding of the characteristics of each media form, and how they contribute to the communication of meaning.

Outcome 1: MEDIA REPRESENTATIONS

On completion of this unit, the student should be able to explain how media representations in a range of media products and forms, and from different periods of time, locations and contexts, are constructed, distributed, engaged with, consumed and read by audiences.

Outcome 2: MEDIA FORMS IN PRODUCTION

On completion of this unit, the student should be able to use the media production process to design, produce and evaluate media representations for specified audiences in a range of media forms.

Outcome 3: AUSTRALIAN STORIES

On completion of this unit the student should be able to analyse how the structural features of Australian fictional and non-fictional narratives in two or more media forms engage, and are consumed and read by, audiences.

UNIT 2: NARRATIVE ACROSS MEDIA FORMS

Fictional and non-fictional narratives are fundamental to the media and are found in all media forms. Media industries such as journalism and filmmaking are built upon the creation and distribution of narratives constructed in the form of a series of interconnected images, sounds and/or words, and using media codes and conventions. New media forms and technologies enable participants to design, create and distribute narratives in user-generated content, which challenges the traditional understanding of narrative form and content.

In this unit, students further develop an understanding of the concept of narrative in media products and forms in different contexts. Narratives in both traditional and newer forms include film, television, sound, news, print, photography, games, and interactive digital forms. Students analyse the influence of developments in media technologies on individuals and society, examining in a range of media forms the effects of media convergence and hybridisation on the design, production and distribution of narratives in the media and audience engagement, consumption and reception. Students undertake production activities to design and create narratives that demonstrate an awareness of the structures and media codes and conventions appropriate to corresponding media forms.

Outcome 1: NARRATIVE, STYLE AND GENRE

On completion of this unit the student should be able to analyse the intentions of media creators and producers and the influences of narratives on the audience in different media forms.

Outcome 2: NARRATIVES IN PRODUCTION

On completion of this unit the student should be able to apply the media production process to create, develop and construct narratives.

Outcome 3: MEDIA AND CHANGE

On completion of this unit the student should be able to discuss the influence of new media technologies on society, audiences, the individual, media industries and institutions.

UNIT 3: MEDIA NARRATIVES AND PRE-PRODU

AREAS OF STUDY

Narrative and Ideology

Narratives are fundamental to the relationship between the media and its audiences. Ideologies in society frame the nature, form and structure of narratives. Audiences and the media together frame the nature, form and development of discourses in society through the construction, distribution, reception and consumption of narratives that implicitly or explicitly comment on, reflect on, develop, reject or ignore ideologies.

Media narratives are the product of creative and institutional practices that represent ideas through media codes and conventions. The use of media codes and conventions influences audience engagement, consumption and reading of narratives. Other influential factors include the social, cultural, ideological and institutional contexts relating to the period of time and location in which the media narrative was produced, the purpose of the media narrative, the genre, style, content, particulars of distribution and consumption and reception. Students examine fictional narratives in the form of two feature length films.

On completion of this unit the student should be able to analyse how narratives are constructed and distributed, and how they engage, are consumed and are read by the intended audience and present day audiences.

Media Production Development

Media productions develop out of that which has come before. Media creators and producers frequently reference ideas and techniques that have been developed by others. Collecting, acknowledging and building upon ideas, structures, aesthetics and techniques informs the direction of media productions and an understanding of how audiences are engaged.

Students investigate and research a selected media form to inform the development of their proposed production. This research contributes to the direction of their production design. Students conduct an investigation of aspects of the media form in which they will work, developing knowledge of narrative, genre, style, media codes and conventions and aspects of the works of media practitioners relevant to their proposed production. Students develop production skills that inform the production, design and development of a media product. They record their learning in documented research, annotated production activities, experiments, exercises and reflections.

Media Production Design

Media production designs are a set of written and visual documents that detail the stages of production of a proposed product. The production design communicates both creative vision and thorough planning. Audience engagement consumption and reception is at the heart of media production. Audiences may be delineated by demographic or social factors, identified by their interests and experience in media works, forms, genres or styles, or created by media institutions or individual producers for a particular purpose. Detailed articulation of audience/s and how they will be engaged underpins all aspects of a media production design. Informed by their learning in Area of Study 2, students use industry specific design and planning, both in written and visual documentation, to complete a media production design. The design incorporates a clear fictional and/ or non-fictional narrative for a specified audience in a selected media form as outlined below. Students take into account the relevant media codes and conventions of the selected media form. The production design is developed for one of the following media forms:

  • A video or film production of 3–10 minutes in length
  • An animated production of no more than 10 minutes in length
  • A radio or an audio production of a minimum of 8 minutes in length
  • A digital or an analogue photographic presentation, sequence or series of a minimum of 10 original sourced images shot, processed and edited by the student
  • A digital or traditional print production of a minimum of 8 pages produced and edited by the student 

UNIT 4: MEDIA PRODUCTION AND ISSUES IN THE MEDIA

AREAS OF STUDY

Media Production

The production, post-production and distribution stages of a media product are a natural progression from the pre-production stage of the media production process. Students move from production into post-production where the manipulation, arrangement or layering of the ideas and material generated in pre-production and production leads to the realisation of their production design.

Media creators and producers reflect on and work with others to gain insight into whether their products communicate their planned intent, refining their products in the production and post-production stages. Students undertake personal reflection and seek feedback on their work, developing, refining and resolving their product as a result. They document iterations of their production after considering the factors that have influenced the development, refinement of materials, technologies and processes, the resolution of ideas and the effect they have had on the final product.

The creation and production of the media product is an individual undertaking. On completion of this unit the student should be able to produce, refine and resolve a media product designed in Unit 3.

Agency and Control in and of the media

The relationship between the media and audiences has never been more complex. The contemporary media landscape poses issues and challenges for the way that academics and commentators have traditionally theorised the nature of communication. The media has always been considered to have the capacity to influence, but now the balance of power is shifting and arguments around who influences who have become highly contested. The media and its audiences are now both thought to exercise agency; the capacity to act and exert power.

Today the media not only produces and distributes content to audiences, it also generates and sustains social networks, which have, in turn, enabled new modes of production, distribution, consumption and reception based on the sharing of commercial and user-generated content.

As the media increasingly crosses national borders, governments struggle to maintain control over the laws and policies created for their jurisdictions. These issues pose challenges for managing and regulating the use of the media by globalised media institutions, governments and the individual.

On completion of this unit the student should be able to discuss issues of agency and control in the relationship between the media and its audience.

BIBLICAL PERSPECTIVE

The media's influence upon society has been profound. In teaching students to analyse and evaluate the media, this study encourages students to critically examine the media from a Christian worldview. God has also designed us to be creative beings, and students are encouraged to use their God-given creativity to produce thoughtful, inspired media products.

ASSESSMENT

UNITS 1 & 2

Assessment tasks are selected from:

  • Audiovisual or video sequences
  • Radio or audio sequences
  • Photographs
  • Print layouts
  • Sequences or presentations using digital technologies
  • Posters
  • Written responses
  • Oral reports

UNIT 3

School-Assessed Coursework

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks Allocated*

Outcome 1

Analyse how narratives are constructed and distributed, and how they engage, are consumed and are read by the intended audience and present day audiences.

  • Short responses
  • Structured questions

40

TOTAL MARKS

40

*School–assessed coursework for Unit 3 contributes 8 % to the study score

School-Assessed Task

Outcomes

Components of the school-assessed task

Marks Allocated

Outcome 2

Research aspects of a media form and experiment with media technologies and media production processes to inform and document the design of a media production.

  • A research portfolio and accompanying documentation examining aspects of the selected media form
  • Production exercises with accompanying documentation that demonstrate a range of skills in the use of media technologies and production processes relevant to the student selected media form

The School-assessed Task for Units 3 and 4 will contribute 40 % to the study score

Outcome 3

Develop and document a media production design in a selected media form for a specified audience.

A media production design plan based on the selected media form identified in Unit 3, Outcome 2.

The School-assessed Task for Units 3 and 4 will contribute 40 % to the study score

UNIT 4

School-Assessed Coursework

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks Allocated*

Outcome 2

Discuss issues of agency and control in the relationship between the media and its audience.

  • Short responses
  • Structured questions

40

TOTAL MARKS

40

*School –assessed coursework for Unit 4 contributes 12 % to the study score

School-Assessed Task

Outcomes

Components of the school-assessed task

Marks allocated

Outcome 1

Produce, refine and resolve a media product for an identified audience from the media production design plan prepared by the student in Unit 3

A media product developed from the media production design produced in Unit 3

The School-assessed Task for Units 3 and 4 will contribute 40 % to the study score

EXTERNAL ASSESSMENT

The level of achievement for Units 3 and 4 is also assessed by an end-of-year examination, which will contribute 40 %.

 

OUTDOOR AND ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES [VCE Subject]

OVERVIEW

This study is designed to enable students to:

  • Develop experiential relationships with, and knowledge of, outdoor environments
  • Develop an understanding of the ecological, historical, economic and social factors that have affected and will continue to affect outdoor environments over time
  • Develop skills, knowledge and behaviours that promote safe and sustainable interaction with outdoor environments
  • Identify and analyse the strategies used to protect, conserve and manage outdoor environments in a sustainable manner
  • Understand the implications of increasing awareness of sustainable environmental relationships
  • Critically analyse interactions with outdoor environments in shaping Australian cultural practices

CONTENT

UNIT 1: EXPLORING OUTDOOR EXPERIENCES

AREAS OF STUDY

Motivations for outdoor experiences

In this area of study students examine motivations for and responses to nature and outdoor experiences. They investigate a range of contemporary uses and meanings of the term ‘nature’, and examine a variety of different types of outdoor environments. Students are introduced to a cultural perspective on the ways humans relate to outdoor environments.

Students learn to participate safely in outdoor experiences and develop relevant practical skills including first aid to enable safe participation in practical experiences. Students use these experiences as the basis for reflection.

Influences on outdoor experiences

This area of study focuses on planning and participating in outdoor experiences. Students evaluate how their personal responses are influenced by media portrayals of outdoor environments and perceptions of risk involved in outdoor experiences.

Practical outdoor experiences provide students with the opportunity to observe and experience various ways of encountering and understanding outdoor environments. Students consider factors that affect access to outdoor experiences and explain the effect of different technologies on outdoor experiences, examining how all of these influence the ways humans understand nature.

UNIT 2: DISCOVERING OUTDOOR ENVIRONMENTS

AREAS OF STUDY

Investigating outdoor environments

This area of study introduces students to the characteristics of a variety of outdoor environments, including those visited during practical outdoor experiences. Students investigate different types of outdoor environments from a number of perspectives.

Students undertake case studies of different types of outdoor environments to observe and experience how changes to nature affect people. They develop appropriate practical skills for safe and sustainable participation in outdoor experiences and for investigations into various outdoor environments. Students use these experiences as the basis for reflection and analysis of theoretical knowledge of natural environments.

Impacts on outdoor environments

This area of study focuses on the human activities undertaken in outdoor environments and their impacts on those environments. Although environmental impacts include both natural and human-induced changes on components of the environment, the focus here is on the impacts of humans – both positive and negative.

Students investigate and model individual and group responsibilities for activities in outdoor environments, including community-based environmental action to promote positive impacts on outdoor environments.

Practical outdoor experiences enable students to develop skills related to minimal impact travelling and living, and to experience the impact of technology on outdoor environments. Students use these experiences as the basis for reflection and for analysis of theoretical knowledge about the effects of natural and human-induced impacts on outdoor environments.

UNIT 3: RELATIONSHIPS WITH OUTDOOR ENVIRONMENTS

AREAS OF STUDY

Historical relationships with outdoor environments

This area of study explores how Australians have understood and interacted with outdoor environments over time. Students examine the unique nature of Australian outdoor environments and investigate a range of human relationships with outdoor environments, from various Indigenous cultural experiences, through to the influence of a number of major historical events and issues subsequent to European settlement. Case studies are used to analyse the role of environmental movements in changing human relationships with outdoor environments. Students study the foundation and role of environmental and political movements in changing relationships with outdoor environments and the subsequent effects of these on environmental politics. Students engage in practical outdoor experiences that enable them to investigate human relationships with specific outdoor environments.

Relationships with Australian environments since 1990

In this area of study students examine relationships between humans and outdoor environments since 1990. They examine a number of ways outdoor environments are depicted in different media. The dynamic nature of relationships between humans and their environment are considered, as well as the social, cultural, economic and political factors that influence these relationships. Students engage in practical outdoor experiences that enable them to collect information about, reflect on and analyse relationships with outdoor environments since 1990

UNIT 4: SUSTAINABLE OUTDOOR RELATIONSHIPS

AREAS OF STUDY

Healthy outdoor environments

This area of study explores the contemporary state of outdoor environments in Australia and the importance of outdoor environments for individuals and society. Students examine the nature of sustainability and use observations to evaluate the health of outdoor environments. They investigate current and potential damage to outdoor environments and the subsequent impacts.

Practical outdoor experiences enable students to further develop and apply their practical knowledge and skills for safe and sustainable interaction with outdoor environments.

Sustainable outdoor environments

In this area of study students focus on the sustainability of environments to support the future needs of ecosystems, individuals and society, and the skills needed to be an environmentally responsible citizen. Students investigate at least two case studies of conflict over uses of outdoor environments and develop a clear understanding of the methods and processes commonly used to resolve these conflicts.

Students develop an understanding that management strategies, together with acts and conventions, contribute to maintaining the health and sustainability of outdoor environments in contemporary Australian society.

Students use their outdoor experiences to reflect on the actions taken by individuals and groups in contemporary Australia to maintain the health of outdoor environments.

BIBLICAL PERSPECTIVE

For students to guard over and appreciate God’s incredible creation, by monitoring and investigating particular features and their environments.

Genesis 1:26 Then God said “Let us make man in our image in our likeness and let them rule over the fish of the sea and birds of the air, over the livestock, over the earth, and over all the creatures that move along the ground”.

ASSESSMENT

UNITS 1 & 2

All assessments at Units 1 and 2 are school-based. Procedures for assessment of levels of achievement in Units 1 and 2 are a matter for school decision. The major assessment task for this unit is a journal or report demonstrating links between theoretical content studied and practical experiences undertaken.

Additionally, at least one task for assessment of each outcome is to be selected from the following:

  • A case study
  • An oral presentation including the use of multimedia and podcasts
  • Data analysis
  • Structured questions
  • Written responses, including essays and web discussion forums

UNIT 3

School-assessed Coursework for Unit 3 will contribute 25 % to the study score.

 

UNIT 4

School-assessed Coursework for Unit 4 will contribute 25 % to the study score

 

EXTERNAL ASSESSMENT

The level of achievement for Units 3 and 4 is also assessed by an end-of-year examination. The examination will contribute 50 %

 

 

MUSIC [VCE Subject]

OVERVIEW

VCE Music offers students opportunities to approach the study of music as a performer, as a creator of music works or arrangements and as a person who studies music works from diverse cultural and historical traditions. Through a study of the music of others and experimentation in their own music making, students are able to demonstrate and discuss meaning in music.

Each unit of Music includes:

  • Music making: the study of ways of making music through developing skills in playing one or a number of instruments or singing, performing in solo and group contexts, composing, arranging and/or improvising
  • Listening and aural perception: developing skills in listening, aural comprehension and making a critical response to music by analysing the characteristics of music of a wide range of styles and geographical locations
  • Music language: the elements of music, compositional devices, and ways of preserving a record of works, and
  • The study of music works and approaches to music making in diverse historical and cultural contexts: researching and considering information and scenarios surrounding the creation of musical compositions and performances, and perceiving and understanding trends and patterns in the way music styles emerge from different cultures, geographical locations and eras

To supplement the educational and musical development taking place in the classroom it is expected that all VCE Music students will be having private instrumental lessons with a teacher of their choosing either inside or outside of school. This is a particularly important step in their musical development over the VCE Music process. It is also expected that all VCE students be involved in at least one ensemble at the Waverley Christian College to further their abilities in working with others musically.

CONTENT

MUSIC PERFORMANCE

UNIT 1

This unit focuses on performance in solo and group contexts, studying approaches to performance and performing, and developing skills in aural comprehension. Students present a solo and a group performance, demonstrate prepared technical work and perform previously unseen music. Students study the elements of music and further their inner-hearing through the development of aural studies and musicianship.

UNIT 2

This unit further develops skills in practical music and performance in solo and group contexts.

Students present a prepared program/s of solo and group works, demonstrate prepared technical work, perform previously unseen music and develop skills in aural comprehension.

Selected works are analysed to enhance performance interpretation and to understand their context, influences, characteristics and styles. This unit also focuses on music language that is relevant to performance and used to analyse, compose or improvise music.

Students use their knowledge of music language to compose an original work of composition or improvisation based around the music selected for performance.

UNIT 3

This unit focuses on the preparation and presentation of solo works. Students use performance techniques to develop understanding of interpretation of a range of styles. Music performance skills are broadened by ensemble performance, solo technical work and unprepared performance. Music language knowledge, aural comprehension skills and understanding of the structure and characteristics of an ensemble work are also developed.

UNIT 4

This unit focuses on the preparation and presentation of a solo program of works, demonstrating through performance an understanding of interpretation. Music performance skills are extended by development of technical work in ensemble performance and unprepared performance skills, and studies in aural comprehension. Understanding and recognition of musical characteristics of and ensemble work are further developed.

MUSIC INVESTIGATIONS

UNITS 3 AND 4

Students who select Music Investigations are primarily concerned with recreating music represented as published notated solo or group works and the interpretation of the musical techniques found within those works. Units 3 and 4 Music Investigations focus on the preparation and presentation of performances in solo and ensemble contexts, demonstrating through performance and understanding of interpretation and authenticity. A Focus Area will be selected by the student in collaboration with their classroom music teacher and their private music instructor. This Focus Area will shape the choice of selected repertoire for the final recital as well as the research and musical direction the student will take throughout the year.

UNIT 3

This unit focus on the preparation and presentation of solo or group works. Students use performance techniques to develop understanding of interpretation of a range of styles. Music performance skills are broadened by ensemble performance, student composition and unprepared performance. Music language knowledge and understanding of the structure and characteristics of an ensemble work are also developed. Students will select a specific Focus Area that is of particular interest to them and will help continue their musical development. Students select one song off the list of notated works and build their program around the selected work demonstrating specific techniques relevant to their instrument and musical development.

UNIT 4

This unit continues to focuses on the preparation and presentation of solo or group works. Students use performance techniques to develop understanding of interpretation of a range of styles. Music performance skills are broadened by ensemble performance, student composition and unprepared performance. Music language knowledge and understanding of the structure and characteristics of an ensemble work are also developed. Students will continue researching and developing their program within their specific Focus Area culminating in a final end of year performance and presentation of their written focus statement.

BIBLICAL PERSPECTIVE

Because music is an integral part of worship and fellowship within the body of Christ and in regard to our relationship with God, the music course purposes to:

  • Instill and develop an attitude of excellence in presenting our best to God
  • Raise an awareness of the creativity of our God and the potential for creativity that He has placed within each of us, to be used for His glory and for the building up of others

ASSESSMENT

UNIT 1

Assessment tasks for this unit will include:

  • A solo technique test that includes material that supports development of the student as an instrumentalist (or vocalist) and preparation of solo and/or group works for performance
  • A solo performance of at least two works
  • A group performance of at least two works
  • A performance of unprepared material

The duration of the solo and group performance will vary depending on the works selected and whether the student is focusing mainly on solo or group performance. A report in one of the following formats:

  • Written report
  • Aural and written reports
  • Multimedia report
  • A test that includes aural, written and practical components

UNIT 2

Assessment tasks for this unit will include:

  • A solo technique test that includes material that supports development of the student as an instrumentalist (or vocalist) and preparation of solo and/or group works for performance
  • A solo performance of at least two works
  • A performance of unprepared material
  • A report in one of the following formats: Written, Aural and written, Multimedia
  • A test that includes aural, written and practical components
  • A folio of composition and/or improvisation exercises and accompanying documentation that describes the use of music language in one of the exercises

MUSIC INVESTIGATIONS

UNIT 3

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks Allocated*

Outcome 1

Demonstrate understanding of performance practices, contexts and influences on musical works

Present a report (multimedia/written/performance) that discusses characteristics, techniques and performance practices of works representative of their Focus Area, including:

  • Analysis of a sample of works
  • Audio/visual excerpts to support analysis
  • Discussion of characteristics and practices and others issue that influence interpretation of works

20

Outcome 3

Present a performance of music works that communicates understanding of the Focus Area

Performance of technical work and exercises relevant to the Focus Area and description of how this technical work is informing development of the performance program

5

TOTAL MARKS

25

*School-assessed coursework for Unit 3 contributes 25 % to the study score

UNIT 4

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks Allocated*

Outcome 2

Compose/improvise/arrange and perform a music work and discuss the use of music characteristics, instrumental techniques, performance techniques and conventions in the work.

Present a composition, improvisation or arrangement of a music work that uses characteristics, performance techniques and other conventions relevant to the Focus Area

AND

10

An explanation of how the work is representative of the Focus Area. The explanation may be in one or more of the following formats:

  • Written
  • Oral
  • Multimedia

10

Outcome 3

Demonstrate artistic intent and understanding of the Focus Area in a cohesive and engaging performance of musical works.

Demonstration of performance techniques, technical work and exercises relevant to preparing for performance of a program of works that relate to the Focus Area, and the discussion of how this technical work relates to the Focus Area.

5

TOTAL MARKS

25

*School-assessed coursework for Unit 4 contributes 25 % to the study score


 

MUSIC PERFORMANCE

UNITS 3 & 4

  • Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 15 %
  • Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 10 %
  • End-of-year Solo performance recital examination: 50 %
  • End-of-year Aural and written examination: 25 %

UNIT 3

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks Allocated*

Outcome 2

Perform a study, technical work and exercises on their main instrument, which will enhance the performance of the selected solo and/or ensemble works, and works that demonstrate unprepared performance skills.

Performance of a study or unaccompanied work with a technical focus.

AND

25

Performance of solo technical work and exercises unaccompanied.

AND

20

Unprepared performance of previously unseen material.

10

Outcome 3

Contribute to interpretation in a performance of a prepared ensemble program.

Ensemble performance.

20

TOTAL MARKS

75

*School-assessed coursework for Unit 3 contributes 15 % to the study score

UNIT 4

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks Allocated*

Outcome 2

Perform technical work and exercises on their main instrument, which will enhance the performance of the selected solo and/or ensemble works, and works that demonstrate unprepared performance skills.

Performance of solo technical work and exercises unaccompanied.

AND

20

Unprepared performance of previously unseen material.

10

Outcome 3

Contribute to interpretation in a performance of a prepared ensemble program.

Ensemble performance.

20

TOTAL MARKS

50

*School-assessed coursework for Unit 4 contributes 10 % to the study score

 

 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION [VCE Subject]

OVERVIEW

This study enables students to:

  • Use practical activities to underpin contemporary theoretical understanding of the influences on participation and performance in physical activity, sport and exercise
  • Develop an understanding of the anatomical, biomechanical, physiological and skill acquisition principles, and of behavioural, psychological, environmental and sociocultural influences on performance and participation in physical activity across the lifespan
  • Engage in physical activity and movement experiences to determine and analyse how the body systems work together to produce and refine movement
  • Critically evaluate changes in participation from a social-ecological perspective and performance in physical activity, sport and exercise through monitoring, testing and measuring of key parameters

CONTENT

UNIT 1: THE HUMAN BODY IN MOTION

AREAS OF STUDY

How Does The Musculoskeletal System Work To Produce Movement?

In this area of study students examine the musculoskeletal system of the human body and how the muscles and bones work together to produce movement. Through practical activities they explore the major components of the musculoskeletal system and their contributions and interactions during physical activity, sport and exercise.

Students evaluate the social, cultural and environmental influences on movement, and how the capacity and functioning of the muscular and skeletal systems may act as an enabler or barrier to participation in physical activity. Sedentary behaviour, overtraining and participation at the elite and recreational level are investigated as possible causes of illness and injury to the musculoskeletal system. Students consider a variety of legal and illegal practices and substances used to enhance performance from an ethical and a biophysical perspective.

How Does The Cardiorespiratory System Function At Rest And During Physical Activity?

In this area of study students examine the cardiovascular and respiratory systems of the human body and how the heart, blood vessels and lungs function at rest and during physical activity. Through practical activities students explore the structure and function of the cardiorespiratory system and their contributions and interactions during physical activity, sport and exercise. Enablers and barriers to the capacity and functioning of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems are investigated from a sociocultural, environmental and physical perspective. Students explore the ethical and performance considerations of the use of a variety of legal and illegal practices and substances specific to each system.

UNIT 2: PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, SPORT AND SOCIETY

AREAS OF STUDY

What Are The Relationships Between Physical Activity, Sport, Health And Society?

In this area of study students focus on the role of physical activity, sport and society in developing and promoting healthy lifestyles and participation in physical activity across the lifespan. Students explore the social, cultural and historical influences on participation in various forms of physical activity, including sport. They investigate at the individual and population levels the physical, social, mental and emotional benefits of participation in regular physical activity and the potential negative physical, social, mental and emotional consequences of physical inactivity and sedentary behaviour, including hypokinetic diseases such as Type 2 diabetes and obesity.

Students investigate sociocultural factors that influence physical activity and consider opportunities and barriers to participation for various population groups and settings. They develop an understanding of the use of subjective and objective methods for assessing physical activity and sedentary behaviour at the individual and population level and compare these to physical activity and sedentary behaviour guidelines. Students identify and describe the components of a social-ecological model and/or the Youth Physical Activity Promotion Model to assist in the critique and creation of strategies purposed at increasing physical activity and/or reducing sedentary behaviour within a given population. Students create and implement an individual activity plan that meets the physical activity and sedentary behaviour guidelines.

What Are The Contemporary Issues Associated With Physical Activity And Sport?

In this area of study students focus on a range of contemporary issues associated with physical activity and/or sport at the local, national and global level. They investigate in detail one issue relevant to physical activity and/ or sport. Possible issues suitable for investigation include declining levels of physical activity across the lifespan, active transport, gender equity in physical activity and sport, cultural diversity and inclusion in physical activity, risk management and safety in physical activity and sport, children and competitive sport, the community and recreation, access to physical activity for population groups such as children, rural and remote communities, cultural groups, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders and people with disabilities.

Students select and explore one issue from a social-ecological perspective to evaluate the affect of individual, social, policy and physical environmental factors on participation in physical activity. Students develop an understanding of the historical, and current perspectives of the issue and forecast future trends. They form conclusions in relation to the impact these factors have on physical activity and sport in society.

UNIT 3: MOVEMENT SKILLS AND ENERGY FOR PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

AREAS OF STUDY

How Are Movement Skills Improved?

In this area of study students examine the biomechanical and skill acquisition principles that can be applied when analysing and improving movement skills used in physical activity and sport. Through coaching and involvement in a variety of practical activities, students investigate and analyse movements to develop an understanding of how the correct application of biomechanical and skill acquisition principles leads to greater efficiency and accuracy in movement skills.

How Does The Body Produce Energy?

In this area of study students explore the various systems and mechanisms associated with the production of energy required for human movement. They consider the cardiovascular, respiratory and muscular systems and the roles of each in supplying oxygen and energy to the working muscles. They examine the way in which energy for activity is produced by the three energy systems and the associated fuels used for activities of varying intensity and duration. Students also consider the many factors contributing to fatigue as well as recovery strategies used to return to pre-exercise conditions. Through practical activities students explore the interplay of the energy systems during physical activity.

UNIT 4: TRAINING TO IMPROVE PERFORMANCE

AREAS OF STUDY

What are the foundations of an effective training program?

In this eare of study, students focus on the information required to form the foundation of an effective training program. They use data from an activcity analysis and determine the fitness requirements of a selected physical activity. They also use data collected from participating in a series of fitness tests to inform the design of the training program. Students determined the relevant factors that affect each of the fitness components, and conduct a series of tifness tests that demonstrate correct and ethical impletmentation of testing protocols and procedures.

How is training implemented effectively to improve fitness?

In this area of study, students focus on the implementation and evaluation of training principles and methods from a practical and theoretical perspective. They consider the manner in which fitness can be improved through the application of appropriate training principles and methods. Students identify and consider components of an exercise training session, they monitor, record and adjust training. Students explain the chronic adaptations to the cardiovascular, respiratory and muscular systems.

BIBLICAL PERSPECTIVE

  • God has made each and every one of us in his image. We are designed with great intricacy and detail to help us live and fulfil God's plan for our lives.
  • In Unit 1, students will learn how God has created our musculoskeletal system to work together to allow movement to occur. They will aso learn how God has designed the cardiorespiratory system to function at both rest and during physical activity.
  • In Unit 2, students will learn about the relationships between physical activity, sport, health and society and the role they play in helping us look after the body which God has given to us.
  • In Unit 3, students will learn about how God has designed the human body in a way that allows for movement skills to be improved and to produce energy.
  • In Unit 4, students will learn about how God has created our body to adapt to training and improve function and performance.

ASSESSMENT

UNIT 1

The core assessment task for Outcomes 1 and 2 is:

  • A written report analysing participation in at least four physical activities that demonstrate how the musculoskeletal and cardiorespiratory systems work together to produce movement

Additionally, at least one task for the assessment of each of Outcomes 1 and 2 is to be selected from the following:

  • A practical laboratory report linking key knowledge and key skills to a practical activity or practical activities
  • A case study analysis
  • A data analysis
  • A critically reflective folio/diary of participation in practical activities
  • A visual presentation such as a graphic organiser, concept/mind map, annotated poster, presentation file
  • A multimedia presentation, including two or more data types (for example, text, still and moving images, sound) and involving some form of interaction or simulation
  • A physical simulation or model
  • An oral presentation such as podcast, debate
  • A written report
  • Structured questions

UNIT 2

The assessment task for Outcome 1 is:

  • A written plan and a reflective folio demonstrating participation in a program designed to either increase physical activity levels and/or reduce sedentary behaviour based on the physical activity and sedentary behavior guidelines for an individual or a selected group

Suitable tasks for assessment of Outcome 2 may be selected from the following:

  • A visual presentation such as a graphic organiser, concept/mind map, annotated poster, presentation file
  • A multimedia presentation, including two or more data types (for example, text, still and moving images, sound) and involving some form of interaction or simulation
  • An oral presentation
  • A written report

UNIT 3

 

UNIT 4

 

 

PHYSICS [VCE Subject]

OVERVIEW

Physics seeks to explain and understand the physical world. The models and concepts developed are fundamental to the other natural sciences, and so the study of Physics is an ideal foundation for a person planning a career in the sciences. The course encompasses atomic physics, electricity, fields, mechanics, thermodynamics, quantum physics and waver. Students also have options for study related to astrophysics, bioelectricity, biomechanics, electronics, flight, medical physics, nuclear energy, nuclear physics, optics, sound and sports science.

By looking at how matter and energy interact, through observation, measurements and experiments, physicists seek to uncover the principles governing the physical universe. The scope of physics is enormous: ranging from the quarks inside nucleons in the nucleus of the atom, to the galaxies 46 billion light years away. A student of physics will learn about the laws and forces which govern these diverse forms of matter, as well as how to harness those laws in useful technology for everyday life.

CONTENT

UNIT 1: WHAT IDEAS EXPLAIN THE PHYSICAL WORLD?

AREAS OF STUDY

How Can Thermal Effects Be Explained?

Students investigate the thermodynamic principles related to heating processes, including concepts of temperature, energy and work.

Students examine the environmental impacts of Earth’s thermal systems and human activities with reference to the effects on surface materials, the emission of greenhouse gases and the contribution to the enhanced greenhouse effect.

They analyse the strengths and limitations of the collection and interpretation of thermal data in order to consider debates related to climate science.

How Do Electric Circuits Work?

Modelling is a useful tool in developing concepts that explain physical phenomena that cannot be directly observed. Students develop conceptual models to analyse electrical phenomena and undertake practical investigations of circuit components. Students apply and critically assess mathematical models during experimental investigations of DC circuits.

Concepts of electrical safety are developed through the study of safety mechanisms and the effect of current on humans.

What Is Matter And How Is It Formed?

Students explore the nature of matter, and consider the origins of atoms, time and space. They examine the currently accepted theory of what constitutes the nucleus, the forces within the nucleus and how energy is derived from the nucleus.

UNIT 2: WHAT DO EXPERIMENTS REVEAL ABOUT THE PHYSICAL WORLD?

AREAS OF STUDY

How Can Motion Be Described And Explained?

Students observe motion and explore the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on motion. They analyse motion using concepts of energy, including energy transfers and transformations, and apply mathematical models during experimental investigations of motion.

Students model how the mass of finite objects can be considered to be at a point called the centre of mass. They describe and analyse graphically, numerically and algebraically the motion of an object, using specific physics terminology and conventions. In this unit, students investigate “How do instruments make music?”.

Practical Investigation

Systematic experimentation is an important aspect of physics inquiry. Students design and conduct a practical investigation related to knowledge and skills developed in Area of Study 1 and/or Area of Study 2.

The investigation requires the student to develop a question, plan a course of action that attempts to answer the question, undertake an investigation to collect the appropriate primary qualitative and/or quantitative data, organise and interpret the data, and reach a conclusion in response to the question. A practical logbook must be maintained by the student for recording, authentication and assessment purposes.

UNIT 3

AREAS OF STUDY

How do things move without contact?

In this area of study students examine the similarities and differences between three fields: gravitational, electric and magnetic. Field models are used to explain the motion of objects when there is no apparent contact. Students explore how positions in fields determine the potential energy of an object and the force on an object. They investigate how concepts related to field models can be applied to construct motors, maintain satellite orbits and to accelerate particles.

How are fields used to move electrical energy?

The production, distribution and use of electricity has had a major impact on human lifestyles. In this area of study students use empirical evidence and models of electric, magnetic and electromagnetic effects to explain how electricity is produced and delivered to homes. They explore magnetic fields and the transformer as critical to the performance of electrical distribution systems.

How fast can things go?

In this area of study students use Newton’s laws of motion to analyse relative motion, circular motion and projectile motion. Newton’s law of motion give important insights into a range of motion both on Earth and beyond. At very high speeds, however, these laws are insufficient to model motion and Einstein’s theory of special relativity provides a better model. Students compare Newton’s and Einstein’s explanations of motion and evaluate the circumstances in which they can be applied. They explore the relationships between force, energy and mass.

UNIT 4

AREAS OF STUDY

How can waves explain the behaviour of light?

In this area of study students use evidence from experiments to explore wave concepts in a variety of applications. Wave theory has been used to describe transfers of energy, and is important in explaining phenomena including reflection, refraction, interference and polarisation. Do waves need a medium in order to propagate and, if so, what is the medium? Students investigate the properties of mechanical waves and examine the evidence suggesting that light is a wave. They apply quantitive models to explore how light changes direction, including reflection, refraction, colour dispersion and polarisation.

How are light and matter similar?

In this area of stud students explore the design of major experiments that have led to the development of theories to describe the most fundamental aspects of the physical world - light and matter. When light and matter are probed they appear to have remarkable similarities. Light, which was previously described as an electromagnetic wave, appears to exhibit both wave-like and particle-like properties. Findings that electrons behave in a wave-like manner challenged thinking about the relationship between light and matter, where matter had been modelled previously as being made up of particles.

Practial investigation

A student-designed practical investigation related to waves, fields or motion is undertaken either in Unit 3 or 4, or across both Units 3 and 4. The investigation relates to knowledge and skills developed across Units 3 and 4 and is undertaken by the student through practical work. The investigation requires the student to develop a question, formulate a hypothesis and plan a course of action to answer the question and that complies with safety and ethical guidelines. Students then undertake an experiment that involves the collection of primary quantitative data, analysis and evaluate the data, identify limitations of data and methods, link experimental results to science ideas, reach a conclusion in response to the question and further investigations that may be undertaken. The student is expected to design and undertake an investigation involving two continuous independent variables. Results are communicated in a scientific poster format according to the template provided on VCAA study design. A practical logbook must be maintained by the student for record, authentication and assessment purposes.

BIBLICAL PERSPECTIVE

This course should enable students to see the beauty and harmony of God’s creation. Students will be better equipped to fulfil the Genesis commission to subdue (control) the earth by having a greater understanding of the laws that govern the physical world. Students will learn to analyse and question scientific ideas put forward by others and be less likely to be deceived by proposals that are contrary to God’s word or nature.

Students will see that scientific ideas are continually changing and that the only eternal truth is in God’s word. Students will learn study and inquiry skills that may be applied to all aspects of their life

ASSESSMENT

UNITS 1 & 2

Assessment tasks for this unit include a practical investigation (student designed or adapted) and a selection from the following:

  • An annotated folio of practical activities
  • A data analysis
  • A multimedia or webpage presentation
  • A response to a media article
  • A summary report of selected practical investigations including maintenance of a logbook
  • A written report
  • A test (short answer and extended response)

NOTE: Unit 3 and 4 Assessment to be confirmed for 2018

UNIT 3

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks Allocated*

Outcome 1

Analyse gravitational, electric and magnetic fields, and use these to explain the operation of motors and particle accelerators and the orbits of satelites

At least one task (which is different from the task/s selected for Outcomes 2 and 3) selected from:

  • Annotations of at least two practical activities from a practical logbook
  • A report of a student investigation
  • A report of a physics phenomenon
  • Data analysis
  • Media analysis/response
  • Design, building, testing and evaluation of a device
  • A proposed solution to a scientific or technological problem
  • A response to structured questions
  • A reflective learning journal or blog related to selected activities or in response to an issue
  • A test (shore answer and extended responses) (approximately 50 minutes or not exceeding 1000 words for each task)

30

Outcome 2

Analyse and evaluate an electricity generation and distribution system

Analysis and evaluation of stimulus material. At least one task (which is different from the task/s selected for Outcomes 1 and 3) selected from:

  • Annotations of at least two practical activities from a practical logbook
  • A report of a student investigation
  • A report of a physics phenomenon
  • Data analysis
  • Media analysis/response
  • Design, building, testing and evaluation of a device
  • A proposed solution to a scientific or technological problem
  • A response to structured questions
  • A reflective learning journal or blog related to selected activities or in response to an issue
  • A test (shore answer and extended responses) (approximately 50 minutes or not exceeding 1000 words for each task)

30

Detailed study

Investigate motion and related energy transformations experimentally, analyse motion using Newton’s laws of motion in one and two dimentions, and explain the mpotion of objects moving at very large speeds using Einstein’s theory of special relativity

At least one task (which is different from the task/s selected for Outcomes 2 and 2) selected from:

  • Annotations of at least two practical activities from a practical logbook
  • A report of a student investigation
  • A report of a physics phenomenon
  • Data analysis
  • Media analysis/response
  • Design, building, testing and evaluation of a device
  • A proposed solution to a scientific or technological problem
  • A response to structured questions
  • A reflective learning journal or blog related to selected activities or in response to an issue
  • A test (shore answer and extended responses) (approximately 50 minutes or not exceeding 1000 words for each task)

30

TOTAL MARKS

90

*School-assessed coursework for Unit 3 contributes 21 % to the study score

UNIT 4

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks Allocated*

Outcome 1

Apply wave concepts to analyse, interpret and explain the behaviour of light

At least one task (which is different from the task/s selected for Outcome 2) selected from:

  • Annotations of at least two practical activities from a practical logbook
  • A report of a student investigation
  • A report of a physics phenomenon
  • Data analysis
  • Media analysis/response
  • Design, building, testing and evaluation of a device or physical model
  • An explanation of the operation of a device or physical model
  • A proposed solution of a scientific or technological problem
  • A response to structured questions
  • A reflective learning journal or blog related to selected activities or in response to an issue
  • A test (shore answer and extended responses) (approximately 50 minutes or not exceeding 1000 words for each task)

30

Outcome 2

Provide evidence for the nature of light and matter, and analyse the data from experiments that support this evidence

Response to stimulus material. At least one task (which is different from the task/s selected for Outcome 1) selected from:

  • Annotations of at least two practical activities from a practical logbook
  • A report of a student investigation
  • A report of a physics phenomenon
  • Data analysis
  • Media analysis/response
  • Design, building, testing and evaluation of a device or physical model
  • An explanation of the operation of a device or physical model
  • A proposed solution of a scientific or technological problem
  • A response to structured questions
  • A reflective learning journal or blog related to selected activities or in response to an issue
  • A test (shore answer and extended responses) (approximately 50 minutes or not exceeding 1000 words for each task)

30

Outcome 3

Design and undertake a practical investigation related to waves, fields or motion, and present methodologies, findings and conclusions in a scientific poster

Structured scientific poster according to VCAA template (not exceeding 1000 words)

35

TOTAL MARKS

95

*School-assessed coursework for Unit 4 contributes 19 % to the study score

 

 

PSYCHOLOGY [VCE Subject]

OVERVIEW

This study enables students to:

  • Apply psychological models, theories and concepts to describe, explain and analyse observations and ideas related to human thoughts, emotions and behaviour
  • Examine the ways that a biopsychosocial approach can be applied to organise, analyse and extend knowledge in psychology
  • Understand the cooperative, cumulative, evolutionary and interdisciplinary nature of science as a human endeavour, including its possibilities, limitations and political and sociocultural influences
  • Develop a range of individual and collaborative science investigation skills through experimental and inquiry tasks in the field and in the laboratory
  • Develop an informed perspective on contemporary science-based issues of local and global significance
  • Apply their scientific understanding to familiar and to unfamiliar situations, including personal, social, environmental and technological contexts
  • Develop attitudes that include curiosity, open-mindedness, creativity, flexibility, integrity, attention to detail and respect for evidence-based conclusions
  • Understand and apply the research, ethical and safety principles that govern the study and practice of the discipline in the collection, analysis, critical evaluation and reporting of data
  • Communicate clearly and accurately an understanding of the discipline using appropriate terminology, conventions and formats.

CONTENT

UNIT 1: HOW ARE BEHAVIOUR AND MENTAL PROCESSES SHAPED?

AREAS OF STUDY

How Does The Brain Function?

Advances in brain research methods have led to new ways of understanding the relationship between the mind, brain and behaviour. In this area of study students examine how our understanding of brain structure and function has changed over time and how the brain enables us to interact with the external world around us. They analyse the roles of specific areas of the brain and the interactions between different areas of the brain that enable complex cognitive tasks to be performed. Students explore how brain plasticity and brain damage can affect a person’s functioning.

What Influences Psychological Development?

The psychological development of an individual involves complex interactions between biological, psychological and social factors. In this area of study students explore how these factors influence different aspects of a person’s psychological development. They consider the interactive nature of hereditary and environmental factors and investigate specific factors that may lead to development of typical or atypical psychological development in individuals, including a person’s emotional, cognitive and social development and the development of psychological disorders.

Student-Directed Research Investigation

In this area of study students apply and extend their knowledge and skills developed in Areas of Study 1 and/or 2 to investigate a question related to brain function and/or psychological development. Students analyse the scientific evidence that underpins the research in response to a question of interest. They then communicate the findings of their research investigation and explain the psychological concepts, outline contemporary research and present conclusions based on the evidence.

UNIT 2: HOW DO EXTERNAL FACTORS INFLUENCE BEHAVIOUR AND MENTAL PROCESSES?

AREAS OF STUDY

What Influences A Person’s Perception Of The World?

Human perception of internal and external stimuli is influenced by a variety of biological, psychological and social factors. In this area of study students explore two aspects of human perception – vision and taste – and analyse the relationship between sensation and perception of stimuli. They consider how biological, psychological and social factors can influence a person’s perception of visual and taste stimuli, and explore circumstances where perceptual distortions of vision and taste may occur.

How Are People Influenced To Behave In Particular Ways?

A person’s social cognition and behaviour influence the way they view themselves and the way they relate to others. In this area of study students explore the interplay of biological, psychological and social factors that shape the behaviour of individuals and groups. They consider how these factors can be used to explain the cause and dynamics of particular individual and group behaviours, including attitude formation, prejudice, discrimination, helping behaviour and bullying. Students examine the findings of classical and contemporary research as a way of theorising and explaining individual and group behaviour.

Student-Directed Practical Investigation

In this area of study students design and conduct a practical investigation related to external influences on behaviour. The investigation requires the student to develop a question, plan a course of action to answer the question, undertake an investigation to collect the appropriate primary qualitative and/or quantitative data, organise and interpret the data and reach a conclusion in response to the question. The investigation relates to knowledge and skills developed in Areas of Study 1 and/or 2 and is undertaken by the student using either quantitative or qualitative methods, including experiments, surveys, questionnaires, observational studies and/or rating scales.

UNIT 3: HOW DOES EXPERIENCE AFFECT BEHAVIOUR AND MENTAL PROCESSES?

AREAS OF STUDY

How Does The Nervous System Enable Psychological Functioning?

In this area of study, students explore the role of different branches of the nervous system in enabling a person to integrate, coordinate and respond to internal and external sensory stimuli. They explore the specialised structures and functioning of neurons that allow the nervous system to transmit neural information. Students evaluate how biological, psychological and social factors can influence a person’s nervous system functioning. In particular, they consider the ways in which stress can affect the mind and body, the role that the nervous system plays in these processes and how stress can be managed.

How Do People Learn And Remember?

Memory and learning are core components of human identity: they connect past experiences to the present and shape futures by enabling adaption to daily changes in the environment. In this area of study students study the neural basis of memory and learning and examine factors that influence the learning of new behaviours and the storage and retention of information in memory. They consider the influence of biological, psychological and social factors on the fallibility of memory.

UNIT 4: HOW IS WELLBEING DEVELOPED AND MAINTAINED?

AREAS OF STUDY

How Do Levels Of Consciousness Affect Mental Processes And Behaviour?

Differences in levels of awareness of sensations, thoughts and surroundings influence individuals’ interactions with their environment and with other people. In this area of study students focus on states of consciousness and the relationship between consciousness and thoughts, feelings and behaviours. They explore the different ways in which consciousness can be studied from physiological and psychological perspectives and how states of consciousness can be altered. Students consider the nature and importance of sleep and apply biological, psychological and social factors to analyse the effects of sleep disturbances on psychological functioning, including mood, cognition and behaviour.

What Influences Mental Wellbeing?

In this area of study, students examine what it means to be mentally healthy. They explore the concept of a mental health continuum and factors that explain how location on the continuum for an individual may vary over time. Students apply a biopsychosocial approach to analyse mental health and mental disorder, and evaluate the roles of predisposing, precipitating, perpetuating and protective factors in contributing to a person’s mental state. Specific phobia is used to illustrate how a biopsychosocial approach can be used to explain how biological, psychological and social factors are involved in the development and management of a mental disorder. Students explore the concepts of resilience and coping and investigate the psychological basis of strategies that contribute to mental wellbeing.

Practical Investigation

The investigation requires the student to identify an purpose, develop a question, formulate a research hypothesis including operationalised variables and plan a course of action to answer the question and that takes into account safety and ethical guidelines. Students then undertake an experiment that involves the collection of primary qualitative and/or quantitative data, analyse and evaluate the data, identify limitations of data and methods, link experimental results to science ideas, reach a conclusion in response to the question and suggest further investigations which may be undertaken. Results are communicated in a scientific poster format.

BIBLICAL PERSPECTIVE

Through studying VCE Psychology, we hope to better understand ourselves in order to further develop our God-given potential (Psalm 139:13-16). Our God has created an orderly world and we strive to interpret this as best we can (Genesis 1:14). By having a better understanding of our behaviour and the behaviours of others, we can relate more effectively in our personal and professional lives. Our physical health is affected by our mental, emotional and spiritual well-being (Proverbs 16:24). It is vital that we understand all of these facets in life and how they interact with each other.

ASSESSMENT

UNIT 1

Outcome 1: Test

Outcome 2: Empirical Research Activity on Piaget’s Theory of Development

Outcome 3: Report of an investigation

UNIT 2

Outcome 1: Test and Visual perception annotated presentation

Outcome 2: Social behaviour media analysis

Outcome 3: External influences on behaviour scientific poster

UNIT 3

UNIT 4

EXTERNAL ASSESSMENT

The level of achievement for Units 3 and 4 is also assessed by an end-of-year examination. The examination will contribute 60 %.

 

 

TEXT AND TRADITIONS [VCE Subject]

OVERVIEW

This subject provides students with an outstanding opportunity to study the Bible as a part of their VCE. This subject is offered at Waverley Christian College with the purpose of empowering students to have a mature and confident grasp of the Bible and the study skills to be able to interpret and apply its message to life today. In Units 1 & 2 students learn about the importance of the Bible’s story for the Christian faith, its authority and the way the Bible relates to contemporary issues in our society. In Units 3 & 4 students study the Gospel of Luke for the entire year. This includes a strong focus on the background of the Gospel which many students find invaluable for their reading of the New Testament.

CONTENT

UNIT 1:  TEXTS AND TRADITIONS

AREAS OF STUDY

Learning To Read The Bible As It Was Intended
This area of study includes:

  • The need to interpret
  • The different types of literature found in the Bible
  • Revisiting famous narratives in the Bible’s storyline
  • Set apart to be a prophet - Jeremiah and the exile of Judah

The Story That Explains All Others. Mastering The Epic Story Of The Bible
This area of study includes:

  • 66 Books + approximately 1500 years + approximately 40 authors = one story
  • Contemporary methods of opening up the Bible’s story
  • The Law and the Gospel - Reconciling two pillars of the Biblical story

Later Uses And Interpretations Of The Bible
This area of study includes:

  • Artistic interpretations of the Exodus and Passover
  • Artistic interpretations of the Gospels
  • Artwork, architecture and the Bible

UNIT 2:  TEXTS IN SOCIETY

AREAS OF STUDY

How Trustworthy Is The Text Of The Bible Today?
This area of study includes:

  • How the Bible was put together and handed down to us
  • Evidence for the accuracy and reliability of the Bible
  • Books that didn’t make it

What Authority Does The Bible Have?
This area of study includes:

  • The God who speaks - Investigating the Doctrine of Revelation
  • The God who can be trusted - Investigating the Doctrine of Inspiration
  • The Reformation and issues of translation

The Other Books. Comparing The Bible To Texts From World Religions
This area of study includes:

  • Differences and similarities between the Bible and the Koran
  • Cults and extreme interpretations of the Bible’s story
  • Mormonism and the Book of Mormon

ASSESSMENT

UNITS 1 & 2

Assessment tasks are selected from:

  • Folio of work
  • Bible overview
  • Film analysis
  • Interview with Senior Pastor
  • Essay
  • Comparative investigation
  • End of semester Examination

UNIT 3:  TEXTS AND EARLY TRADITION

AREAS OF STUDY

The Background of Luke’s Gospel

This area of study includes:

  • Students undertaking a social and historical study of the background to Jesus’ life in the first century
  • Students examining texts relating to the origin and early development of Christianity, focusing on events, people and places important to its development

The Historical and Literary Background to Luke’s Gospel

This area of study includes:

  • Students examining issues that relate to the writing of Luke’s Gospel for example, purpose, authorship and intended audience
  • Students developing a knowledge of Luke in terms of its literary structure and major themes. These major themes will come from the passages for special study but be applicable to the entire set text

Interpreting Luke’s Gospel (Part 1)

This area of study includes:

  • Students applying exegetical methods to develop an interpretation of some of the passages for special study in Luke’s Gospel, and discussing the nature of, and the challenges to, exegetical method

Unit 4:  Texts and their teaching

AREAS OF STUDY

Interpreting Luke’s Gospel (Part 2)

This area of study includes:

  • Students continuing the development of the knowledge and skills required for writing competent exegeses of passages from the set texts
  • Students will engage in an exegetical study of texts in light of the above considerations

The Religious Ideas, Beliefs and Social Themes of Luke’s Gospel

This area of study includes:

  • Students investigating a significant religious idea, belief or social theme arising out of the passages for special study in Luke this idea, belief or theme is then investigated over the entire set text

BIBLICAL PERPECTIVES

“All Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness, so that all God's people may be thoroughly equipped for every good work.” - 2 Timothy 3:16-17 (TNIV).

This subject will seek to further train students in their ability to read and apply the scriptures to their life and the world that they live in.

ASSESSMENT

UNIT 1

Assessment tasks for this unit are selected from:

  • Summaries
  • Textual Commentaries
  • Essays
  • Oral Presentations where appropriate, supported by multimedia presentations
  • Short Reports
  • Exegetical Exercises
  • Comparative Tables
  • Short-Answer Questions

UNIT 2

Assessment tasks for this unit are selected from:

  • summaries
  • textual commentaries
  • essays
  • oral presentations where appropriate, supported by multimedia presentations
  • short reports
  • comparative tables
  • short-answer questions

UNIT 3

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks Allocated*

Outcome 1

Identify and explain social and cultural contexts that influenced early development of the religious tradition.

For each outcome, one or more of the following:

  • Textual commentary
  • Essay
  • Oral presentation, supported, where appropriate, by multimedia presentation
  • Exegetical task
  • Short report
  • Test
  • Short-answer questions

30

Outcome 2

Discuss major themes of the set text, and analyse its literary structure and issues related to the writing of the set text.

30

Outcome 3

Apply exegetical methods to develop an interpretation of some of the passages for special study, and discuss the nature of, and challenges to, exegetical method.

40

TOTAL MARKS

100

*School-assessed coursework for Unit 3 contributes 25 % to the study score

 

UNIT 4

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks Allocated*

Outcome 1

Apply exegetical methods to develop an interpretation of all the passages for special study.

For each outcome, one or more of the following:

  • Textual commentary
  • Essay
  • Oral presentation, supported, where appropriate, by multimedia presentation
  • Exegetical task
  • Short report
  • Test
  • Short-answer questions

50

Outcome 2

Discuss a significant religious idea, belief or social theme in the set text, and analyse and evaluate how related passages from the set text have been interpreted within the tradition at a later stage in the light of the particular idea, belief or theme.

50

TOTAL MARKS

100

*School-assessed coursework for Unit 3 contributes 25 % to the study score

 

 

 

VETA MORPHUS PROGRAM

WHAT IS THE Veta?

Veta (or Veta morphus) provides students with the opportunity to grow in the Christian life, develop skills for employment, and gain academic credit at the same time.

Veta Morphus enables you to complete the 10741NAT - Certificate III in Christian Ministry and Theology, offered through Evolation Learning Pty Ltd RTO #45219. This may contribute to your Secondary School senior certificate and ATAR. Veta Morphus is a structured course that promotes the Christian growth of Senior Secondary Students (Years 11-12) and which develops in students the critical capacities required for work in ministry settings.

WHAT DO I NEED TO KNOW?

Why would I choose to do the Veta?

Students who do the Veta are likely to be interested in the Bible, Christian service and ministry. Veta is a course that combines academic studies and experienced based learning. Veta It is not merely about learning a bunch of Bible facts, or passing a course. Veta is an action and reflection experience, where the truths of the Bible are lived in everyday experience and then formed into your character through deep reflection and Godly relationships. It is a powerful and life-changing opportunity.

You will be placed into situations where your heart, your mind and your imagination can be captured by Christ and then, once captured, transformed by the experience of the radical life you are challenged to live, which is what lies at the heart of the Christian vocation.

Do not conform to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind.” Romans 12:2a

When can I do the Veta?

At Waverley Christian College, you will complete your Veta program in Year 11 (recommended) or Year 12 of Secondary School.

How long will the Veta take me to complete?

You should be able to complete Veta in one year if you commenced it in Year 11 (recommended) or Year 12.

WHAT DO I STUDY?

Students study six strands.

Strand 1 - Retreats

Retreats “… encourage one another and build each other up …” 1 Thessalonians 5:11

Definition: Successful completion of the course requires students to participate in three weekend retreats or equivalent training approved by the State Coordinator, and competently complete any associated work. These are community experiences where students gather together for worship, input, group activities, discussion and workshops … plus down time to spend with friends!

Purpose:

  • To share experience and mutual encouragement beyond your local setting.
  • To receive guidance re: course requirements/competencies.
  • To receive specialist training.
  • To build a sense of community and support.

Specific Tasks:

  • Participate in Retreats or approved alternative assessment
  • Check off course requirements with PGS
  • Complete reflection, after Retreat, in online Workbook.

Time Commitment: Three weekend Retreats, consisting of 60 hours of active engagement, or similar total.

Strand 2 – Bible Engagement 

Fix these words of mine in your hearts and minds; ...” Deuteronomy 11:18a

Definition: Successful completion of the course requires students to read the allotted Bible readings throughout the program and journal on their experience. There are Old Testament readings, New Testament readings and Psalms included in your Bible engagement plan in order to give you a good overview of the Bible during the course of the year.

Purpose:  To develop an understanding of Scripture. To integrate personal story with the biblical story. To gain skills in applying acquired knowledge.

Specific Tasks:

Engage the Bible readings and complete journaling. Encouraged to engage in different styles of journaling.

Time Commitment: 45 hours total consisting of work completed outside of Peer Group:

Bible Engagement:

  • As per the Bible Reading plan.
  • Journaling on your Bible reading: 84 entries (minimum)
  • 30 mins a day x three per week x 30 weeks = 45 hours
  •  You will have five chapters or more of reading per week over the year. You may choose to read one chapter a day, or complete all five in one sitting. However, you must complete three separate journal entries over the course of the week on those readings.

Strand 3 – Peer Group  

“… encourage one another and build each other up …” 1 Thessalonians 5:11aDefinition:  A Peer Group is a small group (normally 4-8 people) who meet together as part of the Veta experience. The Peer Group is guided by a Peer Group Supervisor (PGS). Successful completion of the course requires students to meet with a Peer Group and their PGS to engage in discussion around ministry, faith and biblical reflection. A goal of the Veta program is that students apply and continue to research what they have discovered. To achieve this goal we have included, in the Learning Exercises, a component for you to work on outside of your Peer Group time.

 

Purpose: To integrate ministry experience with biblical reflections and personal faith journey. To build a peer relationship of challenge, encouragement and support. To access resources through an experienced PGS. To receive guidance/input re course requirements.

Specific Tasks:

  • Participate in 30 x 90 minute Peer Group sessions (or equivalent)
  • Invest in peer relationships.
  • Complete:
    • 15 x Learning Exercises completed through Online Quizzes
    • 3 x Spiritual Practice Exercises (found in Online Workbook A) 
    • 3 x Seminar Presentations (Biblical issue, Cultural issue and Personal issue).
    • Check off course requirements with PGS.
    • Maintain student hours tracker on a weekly basis.
    • Complete the prior reading and research of the Learning Exercises before attending Peer Group. These are designed to assist you in understanding the Christian life and often include additional reading material.
    • 3 x Seminar Presentations - You have been allocated five hours per seminar to prepare for your presentation.

 

Accountability: Your PGS is required to maintain records of attendance, check satisfactory completion of reading material and online activity exercises, participation in Christian community, mentoring sessions and ministry placement.

Time Commitment:

Peer Group Sessions:

  • 30 sessions x 90 mins = 45 hours.
  • Activity Research and Preparation: 15 hours.
  • Three Seminar Presentations, Preparation, Research and Development: 15 hours.

Peer Group meetings general outline: Peer Group is the lynch-pin that holds the Veta experience together. These meetings are your primary time for discussion, reflection and integration of the material you are learning. They are also the place where you cover important course administration. It is important that you make the most of this opportunity to grow.

Three Types of Activities:

  • Learning Exercises - These are exercises or activities to help you in your own spiritual walk and to deepen your knowledge of God, your faith and how you live that out! They are also designed to help you in practical skills that you can put into place during your Ministry Placement.
  • This component is to be discussed within your Peer Group after completion.
  • Seminar Presentation(s) - Seminars help you engage life at a deeper level in areas that are of interest to you. The three Seminar Presentations focus on a Biblical issue, Cultural issue and Personal issue. By applying the skills required to deliver a seminar, you will not only discover new information for your life, but the skills needed to communicate your new found knowledge to others. You will be expected to prepare, research and develop your Seminar Presentations outside of Peer Group in your own time.
  • Spiritual Practice - A spiritual discipline or exercise is practised or explored as a group. These are designed to help you grow in your relationship with God.

A Peer Group Session:

You can expect to have the following components in your Peer Group:

  • A discussion on life in general. Discussion points from your Bible Engagement.
  • Clarification of any problem, point of interest or question/s you may have arising from your Bible Engagement.
  • Weekly focus which may be a Learning Exercise, Seminar or Spiritual Practice.
  • Pray about whatever has come up in the meeting.
  • Administration of the group and group activities.
  • Next meeting information.

Strand 4 – Ministry Placements

“… I will show you my faith by what I do.” James 2:18

Definition:  Successful completion of the course requires students to undertake practical application of ministry skills and work in an environment that serves for reflection. The is sometimes referred to as ‘Work Placement’ or ‘On-the-Job Training’.

Purpose:

  • To help students engage in God’s mission to the world.
  • To provide students with opportunity to express, explore and develop their gifts.
  • To encourage students to test and challenge their personal direction and sense of God’s call on their life.
  • To provide work place experience.

Planning:

When planning their Major and Short Term Ministry Placements, students need to be able to do the following in their Ministry Placement:

  • Engage with other people in this ministry.
  • Be the next step for their growth in this particular ministry e.g. not something they have been doing for years.
  • Able to mentor others involved in this ministry.
  • Things that they can move toward that will force them out of their comfort zone and to rely more on God.
  • For students, to meet the criteria listed in the Major and Short Term Ministry reviews in Online Workbook A. Students are to use this opportunity to not just do what is comfortable, but to expand their ministry in ways that they would not normally engage.

Specific Tasks:

Major Ministry Placement (Minimum 40 hours).

All students must engage in one Major Ministry Placement. This may be an ongoing role in a leadership team or a personal ministry usually on a weekly or fortnightly basis for at least six months.

This activity must:

  • Take a minimum of 40 hours of active service.
  • Grow and develop the student and allow reflection on how this ministry fits in with the mission of God.
  • Require the student to take specific responsibility for a substantial part of the ministry involving a group of at least five people.The level of engagement will depend upon the student’s personal capacity; however it is clearly not enough to simply ‘turn up and help out’.
  • Involve the student in all aspects of planning, preparation, implementation and evaluation.
  • Utilise a broad range of gifts and skills requiring effort and creativity by the student . The student should challenge themselves to go beyond their current level of ministry experience and not merely repeating what they have done before.
  • Ministry hours must be recorded.
  • Students are expected to fulfil all obligations associated with any ministry role/s they adopt. Participating in meetings, training activities, events and taking on responsibilities appropriate to their gifts, experience and skills is expected.
  • YOUR MAJOR MINISTRY PLACEMENT CANNOT BEGIN AND WILL NOT BE RECOGNISED UNTIL THE MAJOR MINISTRY START UP ASSIGNMENT HAS BEEN COMPETENTLY COMPLETED. This is a legal requirement for your protection.

Your Major Ministry Placement may include the following:

  • Being on the planning team for a major event.
  • Leading a regular small group.
  • Participating in the leadership of youth/children’s/worship etc. team at church.
  • Running a prayer group/outreach activity at school.
  • Running an after school club for Primary Students.
  • Teaching Sunday school.
  • Leading a community care ministry.
  • Teaching an ESL class. *These are examples. Major Ministry placements are not limited to the above options. If you are unsure if your choice of Major Ministry Placement is suitable, you may need to discuss this with your Peer Group Supervisor.

Short Term Ministry Placement (Minimum 16 hours): All students must engage in one Short Term Ministry Placement which contributes a minimum of 16 hours (including any training leading up to the ministry experience and debrief at the conclusion) towards the overall 56 Ministry Placement hours.

This activity must:

  • Be of an intensive nature.
  • Run across a minimum of two days including one night.
  • Take a minimum of 16 hours of active service. Hours spent sleeping cannot be counted as part of the Ministry Placement.
  • Grow and develop the student and allow reflection on how this ministry fits in with the mission of God.
  • Involve the student in all aspects of planning, preparation, implementation and evaluation.
  • Involve engaging in intentional community with a group of at least five people e.g. sharing meals and accommodation.
  • Utilise a broad range of gifts and skills requiring effort and creativity by the student. The student should challenge themselves to go beyond their current level of ministry experience and not merely repeat what they have done before.
  • Ministry hours must be recorded.
  • Students are expected to fulfil all obligations associated with any ministry role/s they adopt. Participating in meetings, training activities, events and taking on responsibilities appropriate to their gifts, experience and skills is expected.
  • YOUR SHORT TERM MINISTRY PLACEMENT CANNOT BEGIN AND WILL NOT BE RECOGNISED UNTIL THE SHORT TERM MINISTRY START UP ASSIGNMENT HAS BEEN COMPETENTLY COMPLETED. This is a legal requirement for your protection.

Your Short Term Ministry Placement may include the following:

  • Leading on a camp.
  • Participating in beach mission.
  • Running a holiday program.
  • Helping on a school camp.
  • Taking a team to an event.

Accountability: You need to find someone to be your Ministry Placement Supervisor for each Major and Short Term Ministry Placement.

Total Time Commitment:

Ministry Placement contributes a minimum of 56 hours total for Veta Morphus students, consisting of the Major Ministry Placement (40 hours) and the Short Term Ministry Placement (16 hours).

For your Major Ministry Placement all students must complete:

Major Ministry Placement Plan, Student Hours Tracker, Major Ministry Placement Reflections, Student Hours Log and Mid-Year and End of Year Reviews.

For your Short Term Ministry Placement all students must complete:

Short Term Ministry Project Plan, Student Hours Tracker, Student Hours Log, and Short Term Ministry Placement Review.

Strand 5 – Mentoring

“As iron sharpens iron, so one person sharpens another.” Proverbs 27:17

Definition:  Successful completion of the course requires students to meet monthly with a Mentor.

Purpose: To promote Christian growth in the student. To provide a role model for the student.

Specific Tasks:

Meetings between the Mentor and the student. Complete Mentoring reflections and associated assessment work. MENTORING SESSIONS CANNOT BEGIN AND WILL NOT BE RECOGNISED UNTIL THE MENTORING START UP ASSIGNMENT HAS BEEN COMPETENTLY COMPLETED. This is a legal requirement for your protection.

Accountability: The student needs to find someone to be their Mentor. Veta Youth asks your Mentor to respect your privacy and ethical responsibilities in regards to confidentiality, by not talking about your conversations with others inappropriately. Confidentiality, however, is not secrecy. If you tell them about issues where there is reason to believe you have been harmed, are being harmed or are harming others, Veta Youth requires these adults to report this to the relevant reporting body. If possible, we ask the adult to tell you that they are passing on or reporting information.

Time Commitment: 10 hours with a minimum of seven meetings plus reflections.

Strand 6 – Christian Community

“… you are the body of Christ …” 1 Corinthians 12:27

Definition: Successful completion of the course requires students to participate in the life of a Christian Community. Christian Community is a group of people who gather together in the spirit of Christ to worship, to grow in experience and understanding of the way of Jesus, to care for one another, and to participate in mission for their community.

Purpose:  To receive ongoing support in Christian life. To further ground your Veta experience and learning within the context of a local Christian community.

Specific Tasks:

  • Participate in community life.
  • Grow in knowledge and experience through the various elements of the regular corporate gathering of Christians.
  • Complete Christian Community Hour’s Tracker and Christian Community Reflections. If you complete the required hours early in the year, you will still need to complete the Christian Community reflections in online Workbooks 1, 2 and 3.

Accountability: Your PGS is required to check your participation with Christian Community.

Time Commitment: You are required to complete a minimum of 30 hours over a minimum of 10 sessions throughout Terms 1, 2 and 3, plus Reflections.

HOW IS THE Veta ASSESSED?

Veta is assessed through online submissions based on your six strands. All assessments are Externally assessed (non-school based) and on a Compentent / Not-Yet-Compentent basis.

Assessment work will come in the form of Online Workbooks. Online Learning Workbooks

Students will have access to their four Student Assessment Workbooks online during the year. Workbooks 1 and A will be available in Term 1 once the student’s enrolment process is complete. It is the student’s responsibility to keep these up to date and bring the electronic device on which they are completing their Workbooks to all Peer Group meetings. Each Activity in the Workbook must be submitted for assessment after completion.

Students should also be aware that they will not have access to work submitted after they complete the entire course. Students should download a copy of their work for their own records prior to end of the course if they wish to keep what they have done.

WHAT MUST I DO TO BE AWARDED A Veta CERTIFICATE?

To be awarded a Veta certificate, you must successfully complete assessments and placements based on the six strands.

 

HOW ARE MY RESULTS REPORTED TO ME?

Statement of Results

Students and parents are able to track their results via the Veta online platform. The final Veta Statement of Results will be mailed to you by the RTO/Veta in December.

Veta Certificate

You will also receive a certificate if you have satisfied the requirements for graduating with the Veta.

WHERE CAN THE Veta TAKE ME?

This opens the doorway to a variety of ministry and community service employment opportunities. It can also be used as credit for some diploma’s and ministry degrees.

Where do I get more information about Veta at Waverley Christian College?

For more information about Veta at Waverley Christian College you can speak to the following people:

  • Mr Andrew Hindle -  Head of Teaching and Learning
  • Mr Andrew Aldous -  Careers and VET Coordinator
  • Mr Jeremy Dover - Veta Coordinator

 

 

VISUAL COMMUNICATION DESIGN [VCE Subject]

OVERVIEW

This unit focuses on using visual language to communicate messages, ideas and concepts. This involves acquiring and applying design thinking skills as well as drawing skills to make messages, ideas and concepts visible and tangible. Students practise their ability to draw what they observe and they use visualisation drawing methods to explore their own ideas and concepts. Students develop an understanding of the importance of presentation drawings to clearly communicate their final visual communications.

Through experimentation and through exploration of the relationship between design elements and design principles, students develop an understanding of how design elements and principles affect the visual message and the way information and ideas are read and perceived. Students review the contextual background of visual communication through an investigation of design styles. This research introduces students to the broader context of the place and purpose of design.

CONTENT

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO VISUAL COMMUNICATION

AREAS OF STUDY

Drawing as a means of Communication

This area of study introduces the skill set that underpins the discrete design process stages of generating ideas, developing concepts and refining drawings

Design Elements and Design Principles

This area of study focuses on design elements and design principles. Students experiment with these elements and principles when using freehand and image-generation methods such as photography, digital photography, printmaking and collage to visualise ideas and concepts.

Visual Communication in Context

Visual communication design draws on a broad range of sources to support creativity and innovation. Historical and cultural practices and the values and interests of different societies influence innovation in visual communication designs. Through a case study approach, students explore how visual communications have been influenced by social and cultural factors and past and contemporary visual communication practices.

UNIT 2: VISUAL COMMUNICATION DESIGN

AREAS OF STUDY

Technical Drawing in Context

This area of study focuses on the acquisition and application of presentation drawing skills that incorporate the use of technical drawing conventions.

Type and Imagery

In this area of study students develop knowledge and skills in manipulating type and images when communicating ideas and concepts in the design field of communication.

Applying the Design Process

This area of study focuses on the application of specific stages of the design process to organise thinking about approaches to solving design problems and presenting ideas. Students respond to a given brief addressing communication, environmental or industrial fields of design that outlines the messages or information to be conveyed to a target audience.

UNIT 3: DESIGN THINKING AND PRACTICE

AREAS OF STUDY

Analysis And Practice In Context

In this area of study students explore a range of existing visual communications in the communication, environmental and industrial design fields. Students analyse how design elements, design principles, methods, media and materials are used in visual communications in these fields to achieve particular purposes for targeted audiences. Students draw on their findings from the analysis to inform the creation of their own visual communications and they articulate these connections. In response to given stimulus material, students apply skills to create visual communications for different purposes, audiences and contexts using a range of manual and digital methods, media and materials. The visual communications created by students include a two- and/or three-dimensional presentation drawing.

Design Industry Practice

In this area of study students investigate how the design process is applied in industry to create visual communications. Students develop an understanding of the processes and practices used to support collaboration between clients, designers and specialists when designing and producing these visual communications. Contemporary Australian and international designers from the communication, environmental and industrial design fields should be considered for study. Students develop an understanding of the function of the brief and approaches to its development. They examine how design and production decisions made during the design process are influenced by a range of factors.

Students develop an understanding of the legal obligations of designers and clients with respect to ownership of intellectual property and how these obligations may affect decision making.

Developing A Brief And Generating Ideas

In this area of study students gain a detailed understanding of three stages of the design process:development of a brief, research and the generation of ideas. Students develop an understanding of the contents of a brief and the critical role that it plays in forming the direction and boundaries for their research and generation of ideas. They apply this knowledge when developing a single brief that proposes and defines two distinct communication needs for a real or imaginary client.

UNIT 4:  VISUAL COMMUNICATION DESIGN DEVELOPMENT AND PRESENTATION

AREAS OF STUDY

Development, Refinment and Evaluation

In this area of study students focus on the design process stages of the development of concepts and refinement. Using separate design processes, students develop and refine design concepts that satisfy each of the communication needs of the brief established in Unit 3. When selecting ideas to develop as concepts, students must ensure that ideas for each communication need are discernibly different in intent and presentation format. Students manipulate and apply design elements and design principles to create concepts that attract the interest of their target audience and convey the messages, ideas and information required to satisfy the brief.

Final Presentations

This area of study focuses on the final stage in the design process, the resolution of presentations. Students produce two final visual communication presentations, which are the refinements of the concepts developed in Outcome 1 Unit 4. This involves selecting and applying materials, methods, media, design elements and design principles appropriate to the designs and selected presentation formats. Students explore ways of presenting their final visual communications that attract and engage the target audiences.

ASSESSMENT

UNIT 1

  • Drawing as a means of communication
  • Design elements and design principles
  • Visual Communication Design in Context

UNIT 2

Assessment tasks for this unit include:

  • Folio of instrumental drawings of objects that include paraline drawing, scale, Australian Standard conventions in dimensioning, cross-sectioning and circular representations, conversion of two-dimensional orthogonal views into three-dimensional drawing systems and vice versa.
  • Folio of  freehand drawings of objects that shows development of three-dimensional images.
  • A folio of visual communication solutions to set tasks.
  • A written response, supported by visual material, that describes and analyses contemporary and historical examples of visual communications.

UNIT 3 & 4

EXAMINATION

The examination will contribute 35 %.