VCAL

VICTORIAN CERTIFICATE OF APPLIED LEARNING (VCAL)

WHAT IS THE VCAL?

The Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning (VCAL) is a hands-on alternative to the Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE). The VCAL gives you practical work-related experience, as well as literacy and numeracy skills and the opportunity to build personal skills that are important for life and work. Like the Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE), VCAL is an accredited secondary certificate.

Students who do the VCAL are likely to be interested in going on to training at Technical and Further Education (TAFE) institutes, doing an apprenticeship, or getting a job after completing school. The VCAL’s flexibility enables you to undertake a study program that suits your interests and learning needs. Accredited modules and units are selected from the following four compulsory strands:

  • Literacy and Numeracy Skills
  • Industry Specific Skills
  • Work Related Skills
  • Personal Development Skills.

If you successfully complete your VCAL, you will receive a certificate and a Statement of Results that details the areas of study you have completed.

WHAT DO I NEED TO KNOW?

Why would I choose to do the VCAL?

Just like the VCE, the VCAL is an accredited senior secondary school certificate usually undertaken in Years 11 and 12. The VCAL is based on hands-on learning, also referred to as ‘applied learning’. If you choose to do the VCAL, you will gain practical experience and employability skills, as well as the skills you will need to go onto further training in the workplace or at a TAFE institute.

When can I do the VCAL?

At Waverley Christian College, you will complete your VCAL program in Year 11 or Year 12 of secondary school.

What are the VCAL levels?

The VCAL has three levels – Foundation, Intermediate and Senior. At Waverley Christian College we offer the VCAL at Intermediate and Senior levels only. The Foundation level offers only a very low level of basic skills and is not offered at Waverley Christian College.

How long will the VCAL take me to complete?

You may be able to complete the VCAL in one year if you commenced it in Year 11 or 12, depending on how your program is structured. For example, a student commencing Intermediate level in Year 11 can complete a VCAL Intermediate certificate in one year. However, for entry to TAFE, most students would require a Senior level VCAL and would therefore complete that in one year in Year 12. As such the student would receive a VCAL Intermediate and a VCAL Senior certificate.

What do I get after successfully completing the VCAL?

If you successfully complete your VCAL program you will receive a VCAL certificate for either Intermediate or Senior level, depending on the VCAL level you complete. You will also get a Statement of Results from the Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority (VCAA), listing all completed VCAL, VCE and VCE Vocational Education and Training (VET) units, and a Statement of Attainment from the Registered Training Organisation (RTO) for VET or Further Education (FE) training you have completed.

WHAT DO I STUDY?

With the help of the VCAL Coordinator and the Careers Advisor we will help you to develop a VCAL program that suits your particular learning needs and interests. You have the choice of selecting units and modules from each of the following four compulsory VCAL strands.

Strand 1 – Literacy and Numeracy Skills

Your VCAL program must include literacy and numeracy subjects. At Waverley Christian College, VCAL Literacy & Numeracy skills are covered in VCAL specific courses. However, some students may cover these strands in specific VCE studies.

Strand 2 – Industry Specific Skills

Your VCAL Intermediate or Senior program must include industry specific units from VET certificates. However, you are not required to focus on, or complete, any single VET certificate. For example, you can choose to undertake various modules or units of competence from a range of VET certificates to meet the VCAL requirements, and gain experience in a range of vocational areas. The range of VET options is extensive and includes automotive, engineering, building and construction, hospitality, retail, multimedia, information technology, agriculture, horticulture and hair and beauty.

Strand 3 – Work Related Skills

In order to develop employability skills, VCAL gives you the choice of undertaking a structured workplace learning placement or a School Based Apprenticeship or Traineeship and/or part-time work. You can also study units and modules that will help prepare you for work, for example occupational health and safety or job interview skills. You will also be required to complete training in an accredited Occupational Health and Safety (OH&S) module/unit before commencing a structured workplace learning placement. At Waverley Christian College, the Work Related Skills module is covered in a specific Work Related Skills subject.

Strand 4 – Personal Development Skills

As part of your VCAL program you will participate in community-based projects and/or structured activities that will help develop your teamwork skills, self-confidence and other skills important for life and work. At Waverley Christian College, you will be allocated a supervisor as part of the Personal Development Skills modules.

WHAT COUNTS TOWARDS MY VCAL?

I have already started a VET certificate. Will this count towards my VCAL?

Yes. You should speak to the VCAL Coordinator or Careers Coordinator to work out how much of your prior study counts towards your VCAL and to plan the remainder of your VCAL program.

Can I complete a School Based Apprenticeship or Traineeship as part of my VCAL program?

A School Based Apprenticeship or Traineeship fits very well in a student’s VCAL program. A School Based Apprenticeship or Traineeship can meet two of the four VCAL curriculum strand requirements – Industry Specific and Work Related Skills.

Can I work part-time while enrolled in the VCAL?

You can gain recognition and credit for part-time work while enrolled in the VCAL. This work can include:

  • School Based Apprenticeship or Traineeship
  • Part-time work
  • Structured workplace learning placements.

HOW IS THE VCAL ASSESSED?

All accredited courses/certificates that make up your VCAL program are assessed by your teacher and/or RTO.

Do I need to sit for the General Achievement Test (GAT)?

The GAT is a test of knowledge and skills in writing, mathematics, science and technology, humanities and social sciences and the arts. It is done by all students doing one or more VCE or scored VCE VET Unit 3 and 4 sequences. Students whose only enrolment consists of VCAL units are not required to sit the GAT. However, you can choose to sit the GAT if it is appropriate to your pathway into further education, training or employment.

WHAT MUST I DO TO BE AWARDED A VCAL CERTIFICATE?

To be awarded a VCAL certificate, you must successfully complete a learning program of 1000 nominal hours that is designed to comply with the following credit requirements. The learning program must:

  • Be made up of a minimum of ten credits
  • Include curriculum components to fulfil each of the four VCAL curriculum strands
  • Contain components drawn from accredited curriculum such as:  VCAL units, VCE units, VET accredited curriculum or FE accredited curriculum

(one credit is awarded on successful completion of 100 nominal hours of accredited curriculum)

It also must include:

  • A minimum of two VCAL units
  • A minimum of one credit for literacy and one credit for numeracy; and
  • In each of the remaining three strands, components to the value of at least one credit
  • Components to the value of six credits at the level of the VCAL award, of which one must be for literacy and one credit must be for a VCAL Personal Development Skills unit

HOW ARE MY RESULTS REPORTED TO ME?

Statement of Results

If you are undertaking a VCAL and have not undertaken any VCE Unit 3 or 4 studies, you will receive a Statement of Results through your school. If you have undertaken VCE Unit 3 or 4 studies, then your Statement of Results will be mailed to you by the VCAA in December.

The Statement of Results will list all VCAL units where a satisfactory result was obtained. It will also list all VCE units and whether or not you gained an ‘S’ or ‘N’ for every unit you enrolled in – Units 1, 2, 3 and 4.

Your assessments for Units 3 and 4 VCE School-assessed Coursework, School-assessed Tasks and examinations will be reported as a grade A+ to E or UG (ungraded). If you achieve two or more graded assessments and achieve an ‘S’ result for both Units 3 and 4 in a VCE study you will also receive a study score. The study score is calculated on a scale 0–50 and is a measure of how well you performed in relation to all others who took the study. If you have completed VCE VET units, these will be shown on your Statement of Results and if you have completed a full VCE VET program you will receive a separate certificate from the RTO in addition to your VCAL.

VCAL Certificate

You will also receive a certificate if you have satisfied the requirements for graduating with the VCAL.

WHERE CAN THE VCAL TAKE ME?

What if I haven't decided exactly what I want to do?

If you are undecided, then VCAL is a great option in Year 11. The VCAL is designed to be flexible so that education, training, part-time work, School Based Apprenticeships or Traineeships and some of your personal interests are recognised within the certificate. You can choose to complete a VCAL at Year 11 or Year 12, then do further education or training at the next VCAL certificate level or continue your training or an apprenticeship at work.

What are my options once I have completed the VCAL?

The VCAL will give you practical work-related experience and a qualification that will be recognised by TAFE institutes and employers. Together these will help you move from school into work, an apprenticeship or traineeship and/or further training at TAFE. Alternatively, if you start studying for your VCAL in Year 11 and successfully complete it, you may consider going on to complete a higher level of VCAL in Year 12.

Can I get into higher education if I successfully complete the VCAL?

If you are considering going to university straight from school, VCAL is probably not the best option for you. Students planning to go straight into higher education usually do the VCE which allows them to gain an Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR) from the Victorian Tertiary Admissions Centre (VTAC). If you are studying the VCAL at Senior level and decide that you might be interested in going on to university, check with the Careers Counsellor because some universities will consider students with a VCAL Senior certificate for admission. However, entry straight from school is not the only route into university. Some people study a VET course at TAFE, perhaps leading to a Diploma or Advanced Diploma, and then decide that they would benefit from a university course. VCAL would be a good start along this pathway.

Will the VCAL get me ready to enter a trade?

Once you have completed your VCAL, you will have knowledge and skills that are a useful preparation for a trade or industry certificate. The knowledge and skills you have learnt in VCAL may also count towards a traineeship or apprenticeship. Many students include a School Based Apprenticeship or Traineeship as part of their VCAL.

Where do I get more information about VCAL at Waverley Christian College?

For more information about VCAL at Waverley Christian College you can speak to the following people:

  • Mr Andrew Hindle - Head of Teaching and Learning
  • Mr Andrew Aldous - Careers and VET Coordinator
  • Mr Jeremy Dover - VCAL Coordinator

VCAL CURRICULUM OFFERINGS

The following table outlines curriculum options which, on satisfactory completion, meet minimum requirements for VCAL eligibility.

Strand/Level

Intermediate

Senior

Literacy Skills

VCAL Literacy Skills Reading and Writing Intermediate units

VCAL Literacy Skills Reading and Writing Senior Units

Numeracy Skills

Foundation Maths / VCAL Numeracy

Foundation Maths / VCAL Numeracy

Industry Specific Skills

VET Certificates

VET Certificates

Work Related Skills (WRS)

VCAL Work Related Skills units

VCAL Work Related Skills units

Personal Development Skills (PDS)

VCAL Personal Development Skills Intermediate Units

VCAL Personal Development Skills Senior Units

Structured Workplace Learning (SWL)

Workplace

Workplace

Sample Timetable

Bear in mind that the course has a large proportion of hands-on and interactive work and is likely to include a number of excursions designed to help students learning to intersect well with the wider community.

Monday

VCAL at WCC

Tuesday

VCAL at WCC

Wednesday

VET

Thursday

VCAL at WCC

Friday

SWL

 

VCAL LITERACY SKILLS

PURPOSE

The broad purpose of the Literacy Skills units is to enable the development of skills, knowledge and attitudes in literacy that allows progression in the main social contexts of:

  • Family and social life
  • Workplace and institutional settings
  • Education and training contexts
  • Community and civic life
  • Provide pathways to further study and work

These social contexts are not seen to be autonomous and often overlap.

Four domains of literacy have been identified as corresponding with these social contexts:

  • Literacy for self-expression: focuses on aspects of personal and family life, and the cultures which shape these
  • Literacy for practical purposes: focuses on forms of communication mainly used in workplace and institutional settings and in communication with such organisations
  • Literacy for knowledge: focuses on sociological, scientific, technological, historical and mechanical theories and concepts which are relevant to education and training
  • Literacy for public debate: focuses on matters of public concern, and the forms of argument, reason and criticism used in the public arena

The Literacy Skills units are premised on the understanding that effective literacy skills development occurs within social contexts. The application of literacy skills cannot be separated from social context. The overall purpose is to provide an applied ‘real life’ approach to literacy development. Literacy includes reading, writing and oral communication skills.

CONTENT

Intermediate Unit 1: Reading and Writing

Nominal duration: 100 hours

Unit purpose

The purpose of this unit is to enable students to develop the skills and knowledge to read and write a range of texts on everyday subject matters which include some unfamiliar aspects or material. At this level students, once they have identified the audience and purpose of the text, use the writing process to produce texts that link several ideas or pieces of information. In reading, students identify how, and if, the writer has achieved his or her purpose and express an opinion on the text taking into account its effectiveness. At the end of the unit students will be able to read, comprehend and write a range of texts within a variety of contexts.

Learning Outcomes

  • Writing for Self Expression: Write a recount, narrative or expressive text
  • Writing for Practical Purposes: Write an instructional or transactional text
  • Writing for Knowledge: Write a report, explanatory or expository text
  • Writing for Public Debate: Write a persuasive, argumentative or discursive text
  • Reading for Self Expression: Demonstrate that meaning has been gained from reading a narrative, recount or expressive text
  • Reading for Practical Purposes: Demonstrate that meaning has been gained from reading an instructional or transactional text
  • Reading for Knowledge: Demonstrate that meaning has been gained from reading an explanatory, expository or informative text
  • Reading for Public Debate: Demonstrate that meaning has been gained from reading a persuasive, discursive or argumentative text

BIBLICAL PERSPECTIVE

Competence in language, both written and oral, is of vital importance if students are to become effective communicators of the Gospel. However, Christian students need to develop basic skills not only to communicate the truth, but also to discern truth. Students must be able to comprehend and analyse what they are reading and to be able to clearly explain and justify their responses. Through the study of literature, various social values are examined from a Biblical perspective. Common issues which arise and may be explored may include:

  • Use of resources
  • The family
  • Relationships
  • Environmental Stewardship
  • Being a Christian in the workplace
  • Service

ASSESSMENT

Assessment is conducted through meaningful activities and, wherever possible, integrated into and spread throughout the course. Assessment may be through:

For writing learning outcomes:

  • Written text
  • Teacher observation

For reading learning outcomes:

  • Oral or written explanation of task
  • Teacher observation
  • Oral or written response to text

Intermediate Unit 2: Oral Communication

Nominal duration: 100 hours

Unit Purpose

At the end of this unit students will be able to use and respond to spoken language including some unfamiliar material within a variety of contexts.

Learning Outcomes

  • Oracy for Self Expression: Use and respond to spoken language to communicate to others’ story and life experience
  • Oracy for Knowledge: Use and respond to spoken language in informative talks
  • Oracy for Practical Purposes: Use and respond to spoken language in instructions and transactions
  • Oracy for Exploring Issues and Problem Solving: Use and respond to spoken language in discussions to explore issues or solve problems

A range of assessment methods are used including:

  • Observation and written documentation of oral communication episodes; this may be simplified by using checklists of key features observed
  • Recording of student interactions on video or cassette tape; transcriptions can be made for quality assurance
  • assessment of individual interacting with teacher
  • assessment of individual interacting with peers
  • Self-evaluation of their performance
  • Feedback from peers/audience
  • assessment of individual interacting with a wider community audience

 

VCAL NUMERACY SKILLS

PURPOSE

The broad purpose of the Numeracy Skills units is to enable the development of skills, knowledge and attitudes in numeracy that allows progression in the main social contexts of:

  • Family and social life
  • Workplace and institutional settings
  • Education and training contexts
  • Community and civic life
  • Provide pathways to further study and work

These social contexts are not seen to be autonomous and often overlap.

Four domains of numeracy have been identified as corresponding with these social contexts:

  • Numeracy for Practical Purposes addresses aspects of the physical world to do with designing, making and measuring
  • Numeracy for Interpreting Society relates to interpreting and reflecting on numerical and graphical information of relevance to self, work or community
  • Numeracy for Personal Organisation focuses on the numeracy requirements for personal organisational matters involving money, time and travel
  • Numeracy for Knowledge deals with mathematical skills needed for further study in mathematics, or other subjects with mathematical underpinnings and/or assumptions

The overall purpose is to provide an applied ‘real life’ approach to numeracy development.

CONTENT

NUMERACY SKILLS INTERMEDIATE

Nominal duration: 100 hours

Unit Purpose

The purpose of this unit is to enable students to develop everyday numeracy to make sense of their daily personal and public lives. The mathematics involved includes measurement, shape, numbers, and graphs applied to tasks which are part of the students’ normal routine but also extending to applications outside their immediate personal environment such as the workplace and the community, whether first hand or portrayed by the media. At the end of the unit students would be able to attempt a series of operations or tasks with some confidence, be able to select the appropriate method or approach required, and would be able to communicate their ideas both verbally and in written form. They would be at ease with straightforward calculations either manually and/or using a calculator.

Learning Outcomes

  • Numeracy for Practical Purposes – Design: Can interpret and use the knowledge and conventions of common shapes and their representation for describing, designing or representing real life objects
  • Numeracy for Practical Purposes – Measuring: Can use straight forward measurement and the metric system to estimate and measure for the purpose of interpreting, making or purchasing materials in familiar practical situations
  • Numeracy for Personal Organisation – Money and Time: Can use and interpret whole numbers (including large numbers), simple fractions, decimals and percentages to make decisions about money and time in familiar situations
  • Numeracy for Personal Organisation – Location: Can interpret and use everyday language and symbols of location and direction to give and follow oral and written directions
  • Numeracy for Interpreting Society – Data: Can use and create everyday tables and graphs to represent and interpret public information which is of interest or relevance
  • Numeracy for Interpreting Society – Numerical Information: Can identify and translate everyday numerical concepts to interpret public information which is in texts of interest or relevance

BIBLICAL PERSPECTIVE

The study of numeracy, enables students to develop mathematical confidence and wonder in the world God has created. In studying God’s intentional creation of a world of order, pattern and structure, students can both recognise and be thankful for God’s faithfulness. Exploring the diversity of God’s creation, and their place in it allows students to involve experiences beyond just the classroom or a textbook; God’s grace and truth is present in all spheres of our lives, and students are encouraged to first think, then act like Him – responsively, intentionally and faithfully.

ASSESSMENT

Assessment is undertaken as an ongoing process which integrates knowledge and skills with their practical application over a period of time. A range of assessment options is used according to the needs of the student group and the learning situation.

A folio of evidence is collected through a combination of the following:

  • Records of teacher observations of students’ activities, oral presentations, practical tasks, etc.
  • Samples of students’ written work
  • Written reports of investigations or problem-solving activities
  • Student self assessment sheets, reflections, or journal entries
  • Pictures, diagrams, models created by students
  • Use of technology, for example Microsoft PowerPoint, digital cameras, web-based publishing, accounting software

Numeracy Skills Senior

Nominal duration: 100 hours

Unit purpose

The purpose of this unit is to enable students to explore mathematics beyond its familiar and everyday use to its application in wider, less personal contexts such as newspapers and other media reports, workplace documents and procedures, and specific projects at home or in the community. At the end of the unit students will have the capacity to interpret and analyse how mathematics is represented and used. They can recognise and use some of the conventions and symbolism of formal mathematics. The mathematics involved would include measurement, graphs and simple statistics, use of maps and directions and an introductory understanding of the use of formulae and problem-solving strategies.

Learning Outcomes

  • Numeracy for Practical Purposes – Design: Can translate between two-dimensional and three-dimensional real life objects and their diagrammatic representations for the purposes of measurement, design, and interpretation
  • Numeracy for Practical Purposes – Measuring: Can use measurements, the metric system and simple measurement formulae for the purpose of interpreting, making or purchasing materials in practical situations.
  • Numeracy for Personal Organisation – Location: Can use the conventions of distance, location and direction to read, create and use maps
  • Numeracy for Interpreting Society – Data: Can create, use and interpret tables and graphs, and calculate and use averages, in order to reflect on information of relevance to self, work or community
  • Numeracy for Interpreting Society – Numerical Information:  Can use, and calculate with, fractions, percentages, decimals, rates and large numbers, to reflect on aspects of personal, work or community life
  • Numeracy for Knowledge – Further Study in Maths (formulae): Can develop and use simple formulae to describe and represent relationships between variables in real life contexts
  • Numeracy for Knowledge – Further Study in Maths (problem solving): Can use simple mathematical problem-solving techniques to interpret and solve straightforward mathematical problems

 

VCAL PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT SKILLS

PURPOSE

The Personal Development Skills Strand recognizes the importance of applying knowledge and skills within different social contexts. The purpose of the Personal Development Skills Strand is to develop skills, knowledge and attitudes that lead toward:

  • Social responsibility
  • Building community
  • Civic responsibility eg. through volunteerism and working for the benefit of others
  • Improved self-confidence and self-esteem
  • Valuing civic participation in a democratic society

The Personal Development Skills units have been developed to recognize learning, not recognized within other qualifications, that is valued within the community and that develops the skills, knowledge and attitudes identified in this strand. The units enable students to develop personal development skills through participation in locally developed curriculum, for example the Duke of Edinburgh Awards, Advance, a Victorian youth development program or Landcare Programs.

The Personal Development Skills Strand units are designed to develop:

  • Environmental awareness
  • Commitment to, and achievement of, personal goals
  • Civil and civic responsibility
  • Improved health and physical wellbeing

CONTENT

Intermediate Unit 1: Personal Development Skills

Nominal duration: 100 hours

Unit Purpose

The purpose of this unit is to focus on the development of organisation and planning skills, knowledge, practical skills, problem solving and interpersonal skills through participation in experiences of a practical nature. The focus of the learning program for Intermediate Unit 1 includes:

  • Subject specific knowledge applicable to a relevant personal, social, educational and/or community activity
  • Skills applicable to a relevant personal, social, educational and/or community activity
  • Development of self-management skills
  • Development of learning skills
  • Interpersonal communication skills

Learning Outcomes

  • Plan and organise a complex activity
  • Demonstrate self-management skills for goal achievement
  • Demonstrate knowledge, skills and abilities in the context of an activity or project
  • Describe leadership skills and responsibilities
  • Utilise interpersonal skills to communicate ideas and information

BIBLICAL PERSPECTIVE

Applied or ‘hands on’ learning recognises that education is not simply the development of cognitive abilities, or ‘head knowledge’, within students. Indeed, at its core, Christian education starts with the heart; learning in God’s word is designed to lead students to love God and love others. For each student, personal development is holistic; learning involves head, heart and hand. God calls us to exercise wisdom, serve him faithfully and reflect his nature and character in our lives.

ASSESSMENT

Assessment can occur at any time during the unit when the teacher/trainer is confident that the student is likely to be able to demonstrate successful performance. The learning outcomes for Personal Development Skills Intermediate Units 1 and 2 are not sequential and students may do one or both units within a learning program.

Assessment must be valid in terms of context and methods. Assessment must be reliable in showing consistent results over a number of occasions. Assessment must not unduly disadvantage any student and must provide flexibility in the range of methodologies that cater to the needs of individual students.

Evidence of successful performance of the learning outcomes can in include, but is not restricted to:

  • A portfolio of accumulated evidence, for example photos, timelines, logbooks, peer evaluations
  • Teacher observation and/or checklists
  • Evidence accumulated through project or program participation
  • Awards from recognized programs
  • Self- assessment inventories
  • Oral or written reports
  • Evidence of information and communications technology, including Internet usage

The conditions related to the assessment of the learning outcomes may differ according to the particular learning environment, mode of delivery and subject content.

Intermediate Unit 2: Personal Development Skills

Nominal duration: 100 hours

Unit purpose

The purpose of this unit is to focus on the development of organisation and planning skills, knowledge, practical skills, problem solving and interpersonal skills through participation in experiences of a practical nature. The focus of the learning program for Intermediate Unit 2 includes:

  • Subject specific knowledge applicable to a relevant personal, social, educational and/or community activity
  • Skills applicable to a relevant personal, social, educational and/or community activity
  • Problem solving and comprehension skills
  • Presentation and research skills
  • Communication skills for spoken language and active listening

Learning Outcomes

  • Identify planning and organisation skills relevant for the management of health or community service activities
  • Demonstrate skills relevant to complex problem solving
  • Demonstrate knowledge and skills related to hobby, study or interest
  • Utilise research and development skills to present information to an audience
  • Use spoken language and active listening skills to communicate complex ideas and information

 

VCAL WORK RELATED SKILLS

PURPOSE

The purpose of the Work Related Skills Strand is to develop employability skills, knowledge and attitudes valued within community and work environments as a preparation for employment. The development of employability skills within this strand provides learners with a capacity to consider and choose from the range of pathways.

The Work Related Skills units have been developed to recognize learning that is valued within community and work environments as preparation for employment which may not normally be recognized within other qualifications. Locally developed programs that use different social and work contexts to develop the interests and employability skills of young people can be selected for inclusion in the Work Related Skills units.

The Work Related Skills units are designed to:

  • Integrate learning about work skills with prior knowledge and experiences
  • Enhance the development of employability skills through work related contexts
  • Develop critical thinking skills that apply to problem solving in work contexts
  • Develop planning and work related organizational skills
  • Develop OH&S awareness
  • Develop and apply transferable skills for work related contexts

CONTENT

Intermediate Unit 1: Work Related Skills

Nominal duration: 100 hours

Unit purpose

The purpose of this unit is to provide a focus for more complex development of appropriate skills and knowledge in order to provide the necessary OH&S preparation for the workplace.

The Work Related Skills units have been developed to recognise learning that may not normally be recognised within other qualifications, which is valued within community and work environments as preparation for employment. Locally developed programs that use different social and work contexts to develop interests and employability skills can be selected for inclusion in the Work Related Skills units.

Content will be selected for the achievement of the learning outcomes by the school or educational provider. VCAL programs may include content from accredited and non-accredited curriculum, for example TAFE Taster programs. Teachers must ensure that these programs meet the learning outcomes of the Work Related Skills units.

Learning Outcomes

At Intermediate level, a ‘work related goal’ involves work undertaken at Certificate 1/11 level conducted under supervision and reasonable autonomous in regard to planning and work activities. In this unit there is a strong focus on the development of knowledge regarding OH&S in the workplace.

Students must show competence in all six learning outcomes which are to:

  • Learn basic conditions and entitlements of a specific industry
  • Obtain and communicate information in response to work related OH&S issue
  • Develop knowledge and understanding of OH&S in a work related context
  • Identify problems or safety hazards that can affect the safety of the work environment
  • Contribute to team objectives to achieve safe work procedures
  • Use information and communication technology in relation to a work related activity

BIBLICAL PERSPECTIVE

As an image bearer of God, we are required to actively care for God’s creation and participate in His work. Indeed in Genesis 1 God blesses humanity by giving them everything that grows throughout the earth and commanding them to subdue the earth and rule every living thing. God has created use to work for him. This work extends beyond performing tasks of labour; 2 Corinthians 5 reminds us that we have also been given a ministry of reconciliation. Our calling in all aspects of life, including the workforce, is to be a representative of Christ, and through our lives, point to the redemption of the Gospel.

ASSESSMENT

Assessment can occur at any time during the unit when the teacher/trainer is confident that the student is likely to be able to demonstrate successful performance. To receive and ‘S’ in this unit, students must show competence in all six learning outcomes through satisfactory demonstration of all elements.

The conditions related to the assessment of the learning outcomes may differ according to the particular learning environment, mode of delivery and content.

All elements within each learning outcome must be met in the one assessment task. However, one task may be used to assess a number of learning outcomes.

Intermediate Unit 2: Work Related Skills

Nominal duration: 100 hours

Unit Purpose

The unit provides a focus for more complex development of work related and pre-vocational skills in a context appropriate to the task through:

  • Integrating more complex learning about work related skills with prior knowledge and experiences
  • Enhancing the development of employability skills at a more complex level in relevant problem solving situations
  • Developing more complex critical thinking skills that can be applied to work related problem solving situations
  • Developing more complex work related planning and organisational skills that incorporate evaluation and review
  • Developing more complex work related skills, which can be transferred to other work contexts

The Work Related Skills units have been developed to recognise learning that may not normally be recognised within other qualifications, which is valued within community and work environments as preparation for employment. Locally developed programs that use different social and work contexts to develop interests and employability skills can be selected for inclusion in the Work Related Skills units.

Content will be selected from the achievement of the learning outcomes by the school or educational provider. VCAL programs may include content from accredited and non-accredited curriculum, for example TAFE Taster programs. Teachers must ensure that these programs meet the learning outcomes of the Work Related Skills units.

Content can include structured workplace learning and on-the-job learning/training but must enable the achievement of the Work Related Skills unit learning outcomes.

Learning Outcomes

At Intermediate level, a ‘work related goal’ involves work undertaken at Certificate 1/11 level conducted under supervision and reasonable autonomous in regard to planning and work activities.

In this unit there is a focus on the development of knowledge regarding OH&S in the workplace. In this unit students will:

  • Learn to analyse and organise information for a work related goal
  • Communicate information and ideas for a work related goal
  • Plan, organise and manage activities for a work related goal
  • Identify and solve problems for a work related purpose
  • Work with others and in teams to achieve a work related goal
  • Use information and communications technology in relation to a work related activity