Year 10

YEAR 10 [WS Year 10]

The Year 10 students continue with the additional studies and activities, both curricular and extra-curricular, introduced the previous year. The curriculum is designed to draw together the skills and knowledge gained over the previous years.

Core subjects are used to prepare students for both the content and the system of the VCE. The emphasis in all core subjects is on learning to evaluate and utilise the contents of the previous years’ courses.

Specialist subject selections provide a range of choices through which students gain a solid foundation for future VCE courses. Year 10 students have the opportunity to accelerate by studying a VCE subject in Year 10. 

Successful completion of Year 10 is a fine preparation for a life of service to the community and the Lord. For those students planning to study VCE, staff are available for consultation and counsel. The following procedures are suggested:

  • Consult with WCC Staff about possible career paths, requisite courses and subjects. (Information available from Careers Co-ordinator and Library).
  • Discuss subject options with VCE teachers.
  • Make use of Term 1 Parent/Teacher interviews (update on progress).

Staff are also willing to counsel students seeking apprenticeships or employment after Year 10, with a view to assisting each one to find the most fulfilling way of using their God-given abilities.

Waverley Christian College has a rich extra-curricular program, with many opportunities for enrichment and engagement. We encourage all students to get involved in activities of interest to them. See ‘Co-curricular Activities’ for a list of available options.

 

 

WORK EXPERIENCE [WS Year 10]

All students in Year 10 participate in a compulsory one-week Work Experience placement at the end of Term 2.

The aims of the program are:

  • To assist students to learn in a practical way about a particular job and also about the place of work in society
  • To give students experience in coping with new situations and people – thus developing their self-confidence, initiative and independence
  • To give students an opportunity to explore their employment or career options
  • To provide opportunity for parents and children to discuss students’ future.
  • To allow students to observe the use made of skills taught in school subjects

School Work Experience programs are stringently controlled by various legal requirements. These cover such areas as length of placements; payment of Work Experience students; age of students; prohibited tasks and jobs; injury to students, etc.

No Work Experience arrangement can be made without the signed consent of parent, student, school and employer.  Students are also required to complete Occupational Health and Safety Training at the College prior to commencing placements.

To maximise the benefit of the program, students have been encouraged to choose areas that are consistent with both their aptitudes and interests. The DEEWR Job Guide For Victoria is particularly helpful in this respect – go online to www.jobguide.deewr.gov.au .

Students have been asked to take the responsibility for finding their own placements. This may be done through personal contacts of parents, letters seeking work experience, interviews, etc. Where difficulty is experienced in finding a placement, the College will seek to help.

Waverley Christian College students on Work Experience are expected to:

  • Perform the tasks and duties of the job in which they are placed to the best of their ability
  • Follow instructions and abide by all the rules and regulations that apply to full-time employees
  • Dress suitably and behave appropriately
  • Ask questions and make observations concerning their particular job and the place of work in society
  • Carry out the tasks set by the school, i.e., complete and return the Work Placement Report Book, take part in an evaluation of the program afterwards and ensure the school copy of the evaluation sheet is returned to the school


 

BIBLICAL STUDIES Core Subject [WS Year 10]

“A thorough knowledge of the Bible is worth more than a college education.” Theodore Roosevelt

Overview

In Year 10 Biblical Studies, students explore the Christian Biblical Worldview. Students are shown how to look at life issues through the lens of scripture. In the Book of Acts unit, the students explore the development and expansion of the early church. Students are given the opportunity to find their place in the local church by discovering their spiritual gifts. They also look at the powerful role of the Holy Spirit in the spread of the church

Aims

  • To continue to build the discipline of Bible reading in the life of the student
  • For students to gain an understanding of the Christian Biblical Worldview
  • Challenge students to be part of the local church and spread of the Gospel

Topics Include

  • SEMESTER 1: Christian Biblical Worldview
  • SEMESTER 2: Book of Acts

Time Allocation

  • 2 periods per cycle

Requirements

  • Any full translation of the Bible
  • Booklist Items

Assessment

  • Bible Reading Plans
  • Research Assignments

“But in your hearts set apart Christ as Lord. Always be prepared to give an answer to everyone who asks you to give the reason for the hope that you have” 1 Peter 3:15


 

CAREER EDUCATION Core Subject [WS Year 10]

“We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give” Winston Churchill

Overview

The overall goal of Career Education is to assist young people in their career development process. The program consists of the following components:

  • Self-awareness - activities that help students identify their personal attributes
  • Opportunity awareness - activities that involve students in investigating, exploring and experiencing the world of work and the various pathways within it
  • Decision learning – learning to make decisions regarding Career development
  • Transition planning – planning for the stages necessary in their career pathway

Aims

  • To develop a general understanding and appreciation of the world of work
  • To create an opportunity to identify, explore, expand and test career choices before the end of Year 10
  • To provide opportunities for students to gain confidence and better workplace communication skills
  • To introduce students to self-reflection regarding their skills, knowledge and attitudes towards future career choice
  • To develop students understanding of key competencies and employability skills
  • To help students develop job seeking skills
  • To assist students towards exploring pathways beyond Year 10
  • To reinforce the creational mandate from God to be involved in productive work

Topics Include

  • Career Pathways Planning
  • The Nature of Work
  • Work Experience
  • Job Seeking Skills
  • Introduction to VCE/VCAL and Subject Selection
  • Building Your Workplace Skills
  • A Christian view of work

Time Allocation

  • 2 periods per cycle

Requirements

  • Students will need to organise their Work Experience placements with guidance from their class teacher and the Work Experience Coordinator

Assessment

  • Career Pathways Activities
  • Occupational Health and Safety Testing
  • Seminar Reflections
  • Resume and Letter of Application
  • Work Experience Journal

“Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as though you were working for the Lord and not for men” Colossians 3:23

 

 

ENGLISH Core Subject [WS Year 10]

“We must contemplate the import of ignoring the printed word. If you cannot read, you can do only what you are told.” Joseph P. Bean

Overview

SEMESTER 1: Students analyse both written and film texts, utilising their knowledge of text construction including film elements and language devices. Exploring themes of ambition, revenge, freedom, reality and the effects of media, students consider multiple viewpoints on these issues and how they align with a Christian perspective. Students aim to sharpen and hone their vocabulary and expression to present their arguments with sophisticated precision in both written and verbal tasks.

SEMESTER 2: Students employ their analytical skills to compare two texts, considering their construction, themes, approach, style and language. Commenting on themes of mankind’s sinful nature and understanding the other, students consider the impact of these issues on the world from a Christian perspective. Building on their understanding of argument construction, they present a reasoned interpretation of a pair of texts as well as analyse the approach taken by persuasive authors in  regards to their audience, purpose and context. Using these same persuasive techniques, students consider how to defend their own viewpoint in today’s world, presenting a persuasive oral on a current event.

Aims

  • To explore different perspectives on complex issues through reading and viewing a range of texts
  • To draw on a repertoire of strategies to maintain understanding through dense or extended texts
  • To experiment with knowledge of linguistic structures and features
  • To convey detailed information and explore different perspectives on complex, challenging issues through writing for specific and general audiences
  • To consider the contexts in which texts were or are created and how these are reflected in texts
  • To develop the skills of critical and higher-order thinking
  • To use  their God-given gifts of creativity and discernment

Topics Include

  • Shakespeare’s world and texts
  • Creative writing
  • Issues  Oral
  • Analysing persuasive language and images in newspapers
  • Analysing themes and structure in texts
  • Exploring context and its relevance in selected texts
  • Comparing texts and their themes
  • Oral activities

Time Allocation

  • 9 periods per cycle

Requirements

  • Booklist Items

Assessment

  • Text questions and essays
  • Oral presentations
  • Creative writing
  • Class participation
  • Issue analysis
  • Examinations

“They read from the Book of the Law of God, making it clear and giving them meaning so that the people could understand what was being read” Nehemiah 8:8

 

 

GEOGRAPHY Core Subject [WS Year 10]

“For by him all things were created: things in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or powers or rulers or authorities; all things were created by him and for him. He is before all things, and in him all things hold together.” Colossians 1:16-17

Overview

Year 10 Geography investigates how people, through their actions and circumstances, are connected to places throughout the world in a wide variety of ways, and how these connections help to make and change places and their environments. The role of the environment and human modifications in food and fibre production is also studies, as well as the envoronmental challenges and constraints on expanding food production in the future. Spatial differences in human wellbeing is also a key focus of the course, including the different ways we measure wellbeing, the caused of global and regional differences in these measures between countries and places, and programs designed to reduce the gap between differences in wellbeing.

Aims

  • To help students to understand their role in the management of the human and natural environment and resources, especially as God’s stewards on the Earth
  • To understand the causes and consequences of change in places and environments and how can this change be managed
  • To help students understand the complexity of biophysical, managed and constructed environments
  • To evaluate the state of our planet today and in the future, and the impact of human activities on the environment
  • To develop an appreciation of the interconnections and interdependencies important for the future of places and environments

Topics Include

  • Geographies of Interconnections
  • Food Security
  • Geographies of Human Wellbeing

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle for one semester

Requirements

  • Booklist Items
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Research / data analysis
  • Fieldwork
  • Examination

“The earth is the Lord’s, and everything in it, the world, and all who live in it”. Psalm 24:1

 

 

HISTORY Core Subject [WS Year 10]

“What are all histories but God manifesting himself, shaking down and trampling under foot whatsoever he hath not planted.” Oliver Cromwell

Overview

Year 10 History focuses on Australia in the modern world from after WWI, to the present. The course explores Australia’s role in World War II, as well as those events from an opposing perspective. It discusses issues of national identity and investigates the reasons behind global conflicts. Finally, the course looks at Australia’s position in social movements that have swept the world in the 20th century, particularly focusing on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ fight for rights and freedoms.

Aims

  • To examine the impact of major world events on society
  • To develop an understanding of why individual groups and societies have interpreted history in different ways
  • To analyse effects of major values and beliefs on world affairs
  • To evaluate positive and negative aspects of change
  • To use knowledge about the past to explain contemporary events
  • To develop the intellectual skills of inquiry and critical thinking, and apply knowledge to develop and communicate understandings
  • To develop independent research skills in using a variety of sources, including learning technologies
  • To understand that God has a plan to accomplish His ultimate will and purpose for the nations, and is always in control

Topics Include

  • The fight for rights and freedoms in 20th Century and today, particularly pertaining to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples
  • Australia’s role in World War II, Nazism and the Holocaust
  • World War II in Europe and the Pacific
  • Civil Rights movement in the USA and Australia
  • Popular culture in Australia from the 1940’s to 2000’s

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle, for one semester

Requirements

  • Booklist Items

Assessment

  • Research assignments or reports, including oral and multimedia presentations
  • Document Analysis
  • Tests
  • Class participation and group work

“Write on a scroll what you see and send it to the seven churches: to Ephesus, Smyrna, Pergamum, Thyatira, Sardis, Philadelphia and Laodicea.” “Write, therefore, what you have seen, what is now and what will take place later.”

Revelation 1:11,19

 

 

MATHEMATICS Core Subject [WS Year 10]

“God uses mathematics in everything He makes. He makes things in multiples of sevens, elevens, and forties. Everything that God does, He does according to mathematics: the writing of His Bible, the making of Arcturus and establishing the circuit of the earth. He imparts some of that wonderful knowledge to us that we may know something about His grace and love for us is this respect.” Asa Sparks

Overview

Mathematics incorporates skills practice, standard applications, extended problem solving, project work and testing. Students are expected to have access to and become proficient in the use of a CAS calculator. Students are generally expected to complete the coursework designated for their year level; and are encouraged to utilise their talents faithfully. However, it is recognised that there are different levels of mathematical ability. Hence, students may undertake modified work requirements in some cases in order to consolidate fundamental mathematical skills whereas other students may work on an advanced program which develops a deeper understanding of set topics and extends students in more complex topics and applications. This will enable greater access to advanced mathematics options in senior year levels.

Aims

  • To develop each student to their fullest mathematical potential according to their unique God-given talent.
  • To appreciate the way in which mathematics reflects the order in God’s Creation.
  • To appreciate the historical development of Mathematical concepts.
  • To develop the students’ understanding of the concepts of number and space and their inter-relationship
  • To deepen the students’ awareness and understanding of mathematics as a functional tool in solving everyday problems.

Topics common to all students include

  • CAS Calculator Use
  • Indices and Surds
  • Linear functions
  • Measurement
  • Probability
  • Quadratic algebra
  • Trigonometry

In addition, students preparing for advanced levels of VCE Mathematics include the study of:

  • Quadratic functions
  • Non-Linear functions and relations
  • Geometry

Students preparing for other levels of VCE Mathematics include the study of:

  • Financial Mathematics
  • Statistics

Time Allocation

  • 8 periods per cycle, streamed according to ability

Requirements

  • Booklist Items
  • CAS Calculator

Assessment

  • Unit tests
  • Assignments and CAS projects
  • Problem solving tasks
  • Semester examinations

“He determines the number of the stars and calls them each by name” Psalm 147:4

 

 

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT Core Subject [WS Year 10]

“All men have their frailties; and whoever looks for a friend without imperfections, will never find what he seeks.

We love ourselves notwithstanding our faults, and we ought to love our friends in like manner.” Cyrus the Great, founder of the Persian empire

Overview

This subject is structured to capture the enthusiasm of Year 10 students. Topics covered vary from year to year, according to group needs and interests. Students are encouraged to consider their own relationship with the Lord, as well as general areas such as the Gospel, testimonies and missions work. Highlights of the course are the open forums where various topical questions are considered.

Aims

  • To enable students to develop spiritually and emotionally
  • To develop Christian character qualities
  • To encourage growth in relationships with the Lord Jesus Christ
  • To give Biblical guidelines for various areas of development
  • To enable students to grow in confidence through sharing ideas in a group setting
  • To understand Christian character is the product of the Holy Spirit’s work in us
  • To develop a healthy Christian worldview

Topics Include

  • Goal setting
  • Drugs
  • Mental Health
  • Rites of Passage

Time Allocation

  • 1 period per cycle

Requirements

  • None

Assessment

  • None

“Teacher, which is the great commandment in the Law?” Jesus replied, “‘Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind.’ This is the first and greatest commandment. And the second is like it: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’ Matthew 22:36-39

 

 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION Core Subject [WS Year 10]

“The world would have us believe that winning or success is measured by points on a scoreboard or by dollar signs. The Christian realises that winning or success is determined by whether or not a goal has been achieved, and that goal is to bring glory to God.” Thomas M. Boqdon

Overview

Students participate in small-sided games, where they develop a Christian perspective towards cometition with a view to promoting sportsmanship and co-opeartion. The program aims to develop co-ordination, skill and tactical play in more complex situations using a ‘game based’ approach. Promoting fitness for life is an integral part of the program and is addressed by exposing students to a range of different activities and sports from different cultures. Through the Sports Education unit on Basketball, student’s learn the importance of working collaboratively in various roles to create overall success in team sports

Aims

  • To improve skill levels under competitive pressure
  • To improve transfer of skills across games
  • To improve decision-making
  • To improve the use of space in games
  • To develop teamwork and cooperation
  • To develop leadership skills
  • To maximize participation
  • To increase fun, enjoyment and motivation

Topics Include

  • Australian Rules Football
  • Racquet Sports (Bat Tennis
  • Basketball (SEPEP)
  • Cross Country
  • Fitness
  • International Sports (Grid Iron and Hockey)
  • Touch Rugby

Also

  • House Sports: Athletics, Ball Sports, Bat Tennis, Cross Country, Swimming
  • Interschool Sports: Football, Basketball, Soccer, Netball, Tennis, Super 8’s Cricket, Badminton, 5-a-side Soccer, Volleyball, Lawn Bowls
  • Interschool Carnivals: Athletics, Cross Country, Swimming

Time Allocation

  • 3 periods per cycle

Requirements

  • Physical Education uniform as per College Handbook
  • A mouth-guard is recommended to be used for activities that involve a higher level of physical contact
  • A sport levy is charged via the College Fees for Interschool Sport and activities

Assessment

  • Attitude and Application
  • Fitness
  • Skill Acquisition

“Do you not know that in a race all the runners run, but only one gets the prize? Run in such a way as to get the prize. Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever. Therefore I do not run like someone running aimlessly; I do not fight like a boxer beating the air. No, I strike a blow to my body and make it my slave so that after I have preached to others, I myself will not be disqualified for the prize.” 1 Corinthians 9:24-27

 

 

SCIENCE Core Subject [WS Year 10]

“The Christian faith of the early scientists gave them more than presuppositions; it also gave them motivation.

They believed that in studying nature they were discovering the wisdom and power of the Creator and

were thus honouring Him.” James F. Jekel

Overview

Students will extend their knowledge of the natural world and the Laws that govern creation. They will extend their understanding of Chemistry through studying the Periodic Table and investigating a range of chemical reactions. Students gain an appreciation of Biology and the role DNA and Genetics play in storing information and the immensely complex instruction manual that has been majestically designed. Students will be empowered to describe all forms of movement and motion using Newton's Laws. Importantly, students will be reminded of our responsibility to be good stewards of the creation that God has entrusted to us.

Aims

  • To retain awe and wonder when contemplating God's marvelous creation
  • To explore the nature of the biological, physical and chemical worlds
  • To develop skills in communication, investigation and inquiry
  • To gain an understanding of the contemporary cultural significance of science and technology

Topics Include

  • Chemistry and the Periodic Table
  • Origins, Creation and Evolution
  • Biology and Genetics
  • Physics, Force, Movement and Mass
  • Fossils and Geological Time
  • Space Science
  • Structural Engineering
  • Global Systems

Time Allocation

  • 8 periods

Requirements

  • Levy Cost
  • Booklist Items

Assessment

  • Unit tests
  • Assignments
  • Semester examinations
  • Practical investigations and reports

“But ask the animals, and they will teach you, or the birds in the sky, and they will tell you; or speak to the earth, and it will teach you, or let the fish in the sea inform you. Which of all these does not know that the hand of the Lord has done this? In his hand is the life of every creature and the breath of all mankind.” Job 12:7-10

 

 

ART: Fine Art Elective Subject [WS Year 10]

“If God made the flowers, they are worth painting and writing about. If God made the birds, they are worth painting. If God made the sky, the sky is worth painting. If God made the ocean, indeed it’s worth writing poetry about. It is worth man’s while to create works upon the basis of the great works God has already created.” Francis A. Schaeffer

Overview

Students learn and apply skills and techniques to develop a visual language and finished artworks. They explorevisual arts practices and styles as inspiration to develop a personal style, explore, express ideas, and themes in art works. Students select and manipulate materials, techniques and processes to develop their intentions in artworks. In the analysis and interpretation of artworks, they explore different cultures, forms of expression, intentions and viewpoints of artists and how they are viewed by audiences in historical and contemporary contexts. Students experience that their creative abilities demonstrate their uniqueness and they learn to appreciate and respond to the beauty that God has provided through His creation.

Aims

  • To gain a knowledge of the nature of materials, techniques and working methods
  • To manipulate arts elements and principles to effectively realise students’ ideas
  • To demonstrate a level of technical competence in the use of skills, techniques and processes
  • To develop artworks which reflect personal art responses to specific tasks
  • To document thinking and working practices

Topics Include

  • Charcoal drawing
  • Drawing Fundamentals: Portrait, different drawing techniques and sketching
  • Compose a painting: ­Landscape or Still Life
  • Composition Fundamentals
  • Colour Theory workshop
  • Artists and their artworks in society
  • Gelli printing self portrait

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle
  • This unit is offered in Semester 1

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • All class work – research and developmental work, practical projects and resolved artworks
  • Written work and assignments

“Now son of man, take a clay tablet, put it in front of you and draw the city of Jerusalem on it”. Ezekiel 4:1

 

 

ART: Studio Art Elective Subject [WS Year 10]

“If God made the flowers, they are worth painting and writing about. If God made the birds, they are worth painting. If God made the sky, the sky is worth painting. If God made the ocean, indeed it’s worth writing poetry about. It is worth man’s while to create works upon the basis of the great works God has already created.” Francis A. Schaeffer

Overview

Students in Studio Art will explore traditional and non-traditional Art making skills and techniques along with computer methods as a means of exploring, developing and refining art ideas. In the development and process of creating artworks, students are taught the basics of using the digital application ‘fresh paint’ using the Surface Pro. They investigate art elements and principles in creating compositions and learn to refine their visual language using a range of art materials. Students analyse and interpret artworks from Art History and learn how to visually analyse artworks.

Aims

  • To gain a knowledge of the digital equipment ‘Surface Pro 4’, digital art techniques and working methods
  • To manipulate arts elements and principles to effectively realise students’ ideas
  • To demonstrate a level of technical competence in the use of ICT skills, techniques and processes
  • To develop artworks which reflect personal art responses to specific tasks
  • To document thinking and working practices
  • Gain knowledge and understanding of skills used by professionals in the various Art & Design fields

Topics Include

  • Art making techniques: Drawing and Painting
  • Colour mixing techniques and related artwork
  • Personal Digital Artwork using ‘fresh paint’
  • Artists and their artworks in society
  • Art appropriation onto non-conventional surfaces

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle Semester based

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Digital Portfolio
  • All class work – research and developmental work, practical projects and resolved artworks
  • Written work and assignments

“Now son of man, take a clay tablet, put it in front of you and draw the city of Jerusalem on it”. Ezekiel 4:1

 

 

DESIGN TECHNOLOGY: Engineering Elective Subject [WS Year 10]

“In a small way human creative hands imitate this profusion of God, going beyond the minimum requirements of getting the job done. Creative hands are not content to spread on the frosting; they must make a tasteful arrangement of swirls and colour. They don’t just apply a coat of varnish; they polish the surface until it glows like satin.  Creative hands do more than plant seeds; they place them in a tasteful and eye-pleasing garden arrangement.” LeRoy Koopman

Overview

Students in Engineering Design are immersed in the creative process of solving problems by identifying needs and then developing solutions. Depending on the problem, the solution may be a product, technique, structure, process or a combination of multiple elements. This course is intended to stimulate student’s ingenuity, creative and critical thinking and practical skills in devising solutions to engineering design problems. Students use the engineering design process to investigate, design, plan, test, produce and eveluate solutions. Students will be challenged to break problems down into smaller parts, taking risks and playing with their own ideas. The Engineering elective is a practical course which provides opportunities for students to develop knowledge, understanding and skills in relations to general engineering concepts. Students will explore broad topics in Systems, Electricaland Software engineering.

Aims

  • Provide students with opportunities to apply maths, geometry and reasoning skills in practical, relevant and contextualised ways
  • Students will explore computational skills through coding, programming, electronics and robotics
  • Develop Technological, problem-solving and hands-on practical skills
  • To solve an engineering problem, the students would need to design parts, build them, write code and then evaluate their success. This problem solving process will allow them to be inventors of both hardware and software in creative and exciting ways
  • Explore many career fields; including engineering, science, mathematics, computer aided design (CAD) and electronics
  • CAD drawing and designing: Using Autodesk Fusion 360

Topics Include

  • Problem Solving Simulations - Real world scenarios
  • Computer Science – Game Development
  • Electronics and Coding tasks - Using Arduino IDE
  • Engineering Design Process - Mouse Trap Vehicle

Time Allocation

  • 4 periods for the whole year

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Use of technology and equipment
  • Engineering design process - logbook
  • Creative and critical thinking
  • Classroom participation

“Let the favor of the Lord our God be upon us; establish the work of our hands for us. Yes, establish the work of our hands.” Psalm 90:17

 

 

DESIGN TECHNOLOGY: Wood and Composites Elective Subject [WS Year 10]

“In a small way human creative hands imitate this profusion of God, going beyond the minimum requirements of getting the job done. Creative hands are not content to spread on the frosting; they must make a tasteful arrangement of swirls and colour. They don’t just apply a coat of varnish; they polish the surface until it glows like satin. Creative hands do more than plant seeds; they place them in a tasteful and eye-pleasing garden arrangement.” LeRoy Koopman

Overview

This unit aims to introduce and develop a systematic and creative approach to generating technological solutions. Students will gain the ability to apply knowledge and skills by using a variety of equipment tools and materials while incorporating the elements of design. Activities may include: designing and producing practical projects using Wood as the main material; discussions and demonstrations on safe workshop practices; Developing skills and knowledge of hand and power tools.

Aims

  • To understand and use the design process
  • To gain knowledge on the properties and characteristics of various timbers
  • To produce creative projects
  • To develop skills in using tools, machinery and equipment while producing practical work
  • To understand and follow the correct safety procedures in the workshop
  • To develop design and drawing skills

Topics Include

  • Designing and making creative wood projects using complex joints
  • Furniture Design
  • Workshop Safety
  • Crafting techniques- Manual and Mechanical
  • Utilising the design process for each different material

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle Semester based

Prerequisites

  • None
  • A good preparation for further study in Design and Technology (Wood)

Requirements

  • Booklist Items
  • Levy Cost

Assessment 

  • Marks assigned to workshop skills
  • Classroom activities
  • Completed projects
  • Safety in the workshop

“Let the favor of the Lord our God be upon us; establish the work of our hands for us. Yes, establish the work of our hands.” Psalm 90:17

 

 

DESIGN TECHNOLOGY: Engineering Elective Subject [WS Year 10]

“In a small way human creative hands imitate this profusion of God, going beyond the minimum requirements of getting the job done. Creative hands are not content to spread on the frosting; they must make a tasteful arrangement of swirls and colour. They don’t just apply a coat of varnish; they polish the surface until it glows like satin.  Creative hands do more than plant seeds; they place them in a tasteful and eye-pleasing garden arrangement.” LeRoy Koopman

Overview

Students in this course will be introduced to the field of robotics and explore how they are used in our world. The VEX Robotics Design System, combined with Robot C software, teaches students how different aspects of engineering are used in the field of robotics. Students learn how to build, wire and program their robot as they explore how the hardware is entirely controlled by functions they create in software. Students will engage in solving abstract problems in computer programming acticities as well as practical hands on engineering tasks. Together, these will provide opportunities for students to develop, practice and demonstrate creative and critical thinking skills in all aspects of their work.

Aims

  • Provide students with opportunities to apply maths, geometry and reasoning skills in practical, relevant and contextualised ways
  • Students will explore computational skills through C+ programming, electronics and robotics
  • Develop Technological, problem-solving and hands-on practical skills
  • To solve an engineering problem, the students would need to design parts, build them, write code and then evaluate their success. This problem solving process will allow them to be inventors of both hardware and software in creative and exciting ways

Topics Include

  • C+ programming and coding
  • VEX robotics - Design and creating a robot
  • Robot Wars - Challenge
  • Engineering Challenge
  • Inquiry Project - Mechanical Advantage  

Time allocations

  • 4 periods per cycle for a whole year

Pre requisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • C+ Programming and Coding
  • Robot Design
  • Design Process
  • Robot Challenge
  • Team Collaboration

“Let the favor of the Lord our God be upon us; establish the work of our hands for us. Yes, establish the work of our hands.” Psalm 90:17

 

 

DESIGN TECHNOLOGY: Web Design I & II Elective Subject [WS Year 10]

“In a small way human creative hands imitate this profusion of God, going beyond the minimum requirements of getting the job done. Creative hands are not content to spread on the frosting; they must make a tasteful arrangement of swirls and colour. They don’t just apply a coat of varnish; they polish the surface until it glows like satin.  Creative hands do more than plant seeds; they place them in a tasteful and eye-pleasing garden arrangement.” LeRoy Koopman

Overview

This unit is designed to provide students with greater awareness of the implications that technology has on an individual and in society. It is intended to further develop skills that are becoming increasingly more valued and incorporated into many aspects of society. The focus of this course will be on understanding principles of website development and design techniques.

Aims

  • To identify the standards for website development
  • To develop a website that adheres to the standards
  • To be able to integrate commercial computing packages

Topics Include

  • Website design
  • Website development
  • Impact of technology on individuals and society

Time Allocation

  • 4 periods per cycle, year long

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Website development
  • Website
  • Report of the impact of their website

“Let the favor of the Lord our God be upon us; establish the work of our hands for us. Yes, establish the work of our hands.” Psalm 90:17


 

DRAMA Elective Subject [WS Year 10]

“Thinking cannot be clear till it has had expression. We must write, or speak, or act our thoughts, or they will remain in a half torpid form. Our feelings must have expression, or they will be as clouds, which, till they descend as rain, will never bring up fruit or flower. So it is with the inward feelings; expression gives them development.” Henry Ward Beecher

Overview

To cultivate enthusiasm for VCE performance classes and future performances, this course gives students a practical application for all of their cumulative knowledge and skills in Drama. The production will be chosen, cast, rehearsed and developed completely in class time by the students and the teacher. Grades will be based on professionalism, rehearsal attendance and preparation, and effort.

Aims

  • To give students experience in developing a production
  • To prepare students for VCE Drama
  • To cultivate enthusiasm for performance in the students and the school community

Topics Include

  • Acting Skills
  • Stanislavski Training
  • Choosing and casting the play
  • Rehearsal – Documented by workbook entries and group participation
  • Performance – Preparation for maximising audience impact
  • VCE Theory preparation

Time Allocation

  • 9 periods per cycle

Prerequisites

  • Ideally the student will have studied Year 8 or Year 9 Drama, however this is not absolutely essential

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • In-Class Performance
  • Drama folio entries and reflection
  • Professionalism
  • Final Performance
  • Performance Analysis
  • Theory Test

“No-one ever spoke the way this man does.” John 7:4


 

ENGLISH: Literature at the Edge of the Universe Elective Subject [WS Year 10]

Books can be dangerous. The best ones should be labelled ‘This could change your life.’ Helen Exley

Overview

Students will explore the world and origin of the Science Fiction genre of Literature. They will examine defining features of the genre and how culture and the political climate affects and is reflected in both the structure and content of both cinematic and written texts. With a focus on contemporary television and classic and modern Science Fiction texts students will look at how the genre has changed with time. Students will further examine how Science Fiction storytelling has become a part of popular culture and how authors use this genre to advocate for social justice. Students will be challenged to examine the issues that arise in these texts through a Christian perspective and further develop their faith.  In addition to this, students will focus on authorial intent and how writers use different mediums to convey their point of view and impact their audience.

Aims

  • To enhance the literacy standards of students in Year 10
  • To cultivate intellectual curiosity, creativity, critical thinking and discernment
  • To prepare students for VCE English 
  • To understand the role of authorial intent

Topics Include

  • Asimov and Beyond: Classic Science Fiction
  • Doctor Who and Social Justice
  • Authorial Intent: The Social and Political Agendas of Science Fiction
  • Contemporary Science Fiction
  • Responding Creatively
  • The role of Young Adult Science Fiction
  • Vocabulary Development

Time Allocation

  • 4 periods per cycle for a whole year

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Booklist Items 
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Creative Writing
  • Literary Analysis
  • Oral Presentation

“They read from the Book of the Law of God, making it clear and giving them meaning so that the people could understand what was being read” Nehemiah 8:8

 

 

ENGLISH: Journalism - It all Unfolds Here Elective Subject [WS Year 10]

“Newspapers cannot be defined by the second word—paper. They’ve got to be defined by the first word—news.” Arthur Sulzberg, Jr.

Overview

Students will explore the world of Journalism, beginning with the History of the Press. Students will be encouraged to develop an understanding of the changing nature of the News and how the Digital Age has impacted the Press. Language Analysis will be a prominent part of this course, assisting students with their understanding of how argument works and how to effectively write a Language Analysis piece. Students will be encouraged to critically examine articles and the defining features of different types of writing. The social and political agenda of the media will be explored as students continue to work on their analytical skills. Students will also get the opportunity to write and present creatively, with a focus on the different types of journalism. In addition to learning the history of the Press and its impact on society, students will expand and develop their vocabulary.

Aims

  • To enhance the literacy standards of students in Year 10
  • To cultivate intellectual curiosity, creativity, critical thinking and discernment
  • To prepare students for VCE English
  • To encourage students to engage with news media outside of the classroom
  • To have students become more socially and politically aware

Topics Include

  • History of the Press
  • The News in the Digital Age
  • News Broadcasting
  • Language Analysis
  • Creation of a Newspaper
  • Social and Political Agenda
  • Informative Writing
  • Investigative Reporting

Time Allocation

  • 4 periods per cycle, year long

Requirements 

  • Booklist Items 
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Investigative Reporting
  • Informative Writing
  • Language Analysis
  • Creative Writing
  • Oral Presentation
  • Newspaper Creation (Whole Class Assessment)

“They read from the Book of the Law of God, making it clear and giving them meaning so that the people could understand what was being read” Nehemiah 8:8

 

 

FOOD STUDIES: Celebrate Food! Elective Subject [WS Year 10]

“Look to your health; and if you have it, praise God and value it next to a good conscience; for health is the second blessing that we mortals are capable of – a blessing that money cannot buy; therefore value it, and be thankful for it.” Isaak Walton

Overview

Students have the opportunity to demonstrate love for others through the sharing of food and fellowship around shared food and experiences. Students develop skills in the preparation and service of a wide range of foods suitable for hospitality, as they follow the directive in scripture to offer hospitality. The subject is highly practical with theory components relating to food service and hospitality. Theory topics include function planning and sensory perception of food. During practical work, the emphasis is on developing a very high standard of organisational skill, food handling and presentation. Students plan, prepare and cater for a staff function.

Aims

  • To encourage students to utilise their skills and passion for food and cooking to serve and bless others
  • To apply knowledge of a broad range of cooking techniques, employing advanced skills
  • To continually employ safe and hygienic food preparation practices
  • To develop new skills and techniques, particularly in the presentation of food
  • To understand ingredients and their use in cooking
  • To embrace opportunities to exhibit the Biblical example of fellowship around food

Topics Include

  • Kitchen skills
  • Hygiene
  • Function planning
  • Menus and meal preparation
  • Food presentation
  • Organisation and time management
  • Time management

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle Semester based

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Booklist Items
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Practical work and written evaluations
  • Tests
  • Assignment

“Then God said, “I give you every seed bearing plant on the face of the whole earth and every tree than has fruit with seed in it. They will be yours for food.” Genesis 1:29

 

 

FOOD STUDIES: Food As Gifts Elective Subject [WS Year 10]

“Look to your health; and if you have it, praise God and value it next to a good conscience; for health is the second blessing that we mortals are capable of – a blessing that money cannot buy; therefore value it, and be thankful for it.” Isaak Walton

Overview

Students explore the many ways that food can be used as gifts, utilising our skills and resources to bless others. Students are introduced to the functional properties of ingredients that go into making various edible gifts. Practical lessons build on the skills gained in previous Food Studies classes by using more advanced cookery processes and preservation techniques. As the Semester culminates in the Christmas season, the biblical principle of generosity and the example of Jesus’ ultimate gift becomes even more befitting.

Aims

  • To encourage students to utilise their skills and passion for food and cooking to serve and bless others
  • To apply knowledge of a broad range of cooking techniques, employing advanced skills
  • To continually employ safe and hygienic food preparation practices
  • To develop new skills and techniques, particularly in the presentation of food
  • To understand ingredients and their use in cooking, especially those used for preservation purposes
  • To embrace opportunities to exhibit the Biblical example of fellowship around food.

Topics Include

  • Chocolate
  • Cakes
  • Biscuits
  • Preserves and jams
  • Cake decoration
  • Packaging and labelling

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle Semester based

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Booklist Items
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Practical work and written evaluation
  • Tests
  • Major Assessment Piece

“Then God said, “I give you every seed bearing plant on the face of the whole earth and every tree than has fruit with seed in it. They will be yours for food.” Genesis 1:29

 

 

LANGUAGE: Chinese I and II Elective Subject [WS Year 10]

“A man who is ignorant of foreign languages is ignorant of his own.” Johann Goethe

Overview

The Year 10 Chinese course builds on topics covered in Years 8 and 9 and includes such topics as school life, leisure life, travelling, and sickness. Study of culture is an integral part of the curriculum. Students continue to develop and refine their reading in Chinese characters and character writing skills through exposure to a range of documents in the Chinese script and structured study of grammar. Listening and speaking skills are developed through activities such as role-plays, pair work, interviews, and the use of multimedia and technologies such as CDs and DVDs, IPads, and laptops. A student’s progress is assessed in the outcome strands of listening and responding, and speaking; viewing, reading and responding; and writing. Students are taught in mixed ability groups and may choose to continue their studies into Years 11 and 12.

Aims

  • Students will have some understanding of what the Bible has to say about language
  • Students learn about the rich and varied culture of China and Chinese speaking communities around the world. To give the students an understanding of one of our neighbouring nations, its culture, traditions and values
  • Students understand and use Chinese within the world of teenage experience and demonstrate comprehension of factual information from topics of interest

Topics Include

  • Asking school subjects, tests, class
  • Getting around, modes of transport
  • Leisure activities
  • Describing appearances
  • Travel, holidays
  • Feeling sick
  • Celebrations

Time Allocation

  • 9 periods per cycle for the whole year

Prerequisites

  • Recommended prior study: Year 9 LOTE Chinese
  • For students who have not taken Chinese in Year 9: Teaching and learning will support and cater for mixed abilities

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment:

  • Oral and written communication activities
  • Classroom work and activities, workbook/games/role-plays
  • Ability to respond to Chinese instructions
  • Tests and exams

“The Lord said, “If as one people speaking the same language they have begun to do this, then nothing they plan to do will be impossible for them. Come, let us go down and confuse their language so they will not understand each other.” That is why it was called Babel – because there the Lord confused the language of the whole world. From there the Lord scattered them over the face of the whole earth.” Genesis 11:6-7, 9

 

 

LANGUAGE: French I and II Elective Subject [WS Year 10]

“A man who is ignorant of foreign languages is ignorant of his own.” Johann Goethe

Overview

Students will be inspired as they develop their understanding of the important role language plays in our relations with our neighbours, creation, and our Creator. Students continue to use written and spoken French to communicate with teachers, peers and others in a range of settings and for a range of purposes. They use language to access and exchange information on a broad range of social, cultural and youth-related issues. Students recognise and use appropriate terminology to explain some irregularities of grammatical patterns and rules (irregular verb forms, different word order of some adjective-noun combinations), and textual conventions associated with familiar. They produce informative, persuasive and imaginative texts, incorporating relative clauses and adverbial phrases, using some specialised vocabulary and cohesive devices.

Students intending to continue French in Year 11 must undertake three units of French in Year 10.

Aims

  • Students will have some understanding of what the Bible has to say about language
  • Students learn about the rich and varied culture of France and Francophone communities around the world. To give the students an understanding of one of our neighbouring nations, its culture, traditions and values
  • Students understand and use French within the world of teenage experience and demonstrate comprehension of factual information from topics of interest

Topics Include

  • Discussing jobs and money
  • Making holiday plans
  • Hotels and travelling
  • Talking about a healthy lifestyle
  • Talking about family relationships and future plans
  • Talking about world issues and environmental issues

Time Allocation

  • 9 periods for the whole year

Prerequisites

  • Recommended prior study: Year 9 French
  • For students who have not taken French in Year 9: Teaching and learning will support and cater for mixed abilities

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Writing, listening, speaking, reading comprehension and cultural knowledge and understanding tasks
  • End of semester examination

“The Lord said, “If as one people speaking the same language they have begun to do this, then nothing they plan to do will be impossible for them. Come, let us go down and confuse their language so they will not understand each other.” That is why it was called Babel – because there the Lord confused the language of the whole world. From there the Lord scattered them over the face of the whole earth.” Genesis 11:6-7, 9

 

 

LITERATURE Elective Subject [WS Year 10]

“To read without reflecting is like eating without digesting”. Edmund Burke

Overview

Year 10 Literature encourages students to foster a love of reading and writing, developing an appreciation for the aesthetic merit and beauty of texts.  Students consider how texts are a reflection of the world in which they are written and how deeply embedded they are in social, historical and cultural contexts. Through close analysis of texts, students consider how literary elements and techniques construct meaning. Students engage in close reading of texts, using critical thinking to respond to texts analytically and creatively. They consider different ways of reading texts as informed by the views and values of the reader. Year 10 Literature provides students with opportunities to examine the complexity of human experience as represented in a wide range of  texts while comparing this with the Christian experience of journeying with God.

Aims

  • To develop an enjoyment and appreciation of literature
  • To develop creative, innovative and critical thinking through analysis and creation of a range of texts
  • To demonstrate an understanding of how the views and values of the reader and author shape interpretation of text
  • To examine how literary elements and techniques shape interpretation of texts

Topics Include

  •  War Poetry
  •  Analysis of Classic Literature

Time Allocation

  • 4 periods a cycle
  • This unit is offered in both Semester 1 and 2

Requirements

  • Booklist items
  • Levy cost

Assessments

  • Writing folio
  • Oral presentation
  • Creative and analytical essays 

“They read from the Book of the Law of God, making it clear and giving them meaning so that the people could understand what was being read” Nehemiah 8:8


 

MEDIA: Digital Photography Elective Subject [WS Year 10]

“God’s creative activity went far beyond the minimum requirements for getting the job done. Butterflies in the rain forest seldom seen by human eyes are creatures of breathtaking beauty. The delicate transparency of the man-of-war and the hummingbird’s wing are inimitable” Le Roy Koopman

Overview

In this unit, students learn about various cameras, lenses and other accessories. They explore different elements of composition in order to learn to take more interesting photographs and further develop their understanding of camera settings such as shutter speed and aperture. Using their newfound knowledge of manual controls, they participate in a variety of projects to build their photography skills. Students are also introduced to basic editing skills through the use of Lightroom, and learn how to make suitable adjustments and enhancements to their own photos. As part of this unit, students also repurpose images from other photographers to create new works of art, and analyse images created by photographers.

Aims

  • Students will develop camera handling skills, including use of manual controls and compositional framing
  • To use photo processing software to effectively enhance and edit images
  • To practice skills in a wide range of photographic genres
  • To understand the practice of other photographers and examine the design elements and principles of their work
  • To use social media tools to distribute images in order to gain a following and understand how different platforms can be used effectively by the photographer

Topics Include

  • Looking at your digital camera and its functions
  • Using manual controls
  • Understanding and Using Lightroom to import, collect and enhance images
  • Advanced image retouching in Lightroom
  • Sports Photography
  • Using Social Media
  • Photography for Social Change
  • Portrait photography

Time Allocation

  • 5 Periods per cycle
  • This unit is offered only in Semester 1

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy Cost
  • Personal CF Card – at least 4GB

Assessment

  • Series of projects
  • Reflection Questions
  • Photographer Biography and Image Analysis
  • Environmental Collage

“The Lord said, “If as one people speaking the same language they have begun to do this, then nothing they plan to do will be impossible for them. Come, let us go down and confuse their language so they will not understand each other.” That is why it was called Babel – because there the Lord confused the language of the whole world. From there the Lord scattered them over the face of the whole earth.” Genesis 11:6-7, 9


 

PERFORMING ARTS: Music My Way Elective Subject [WS Year 10]

“The aim and final reason of all music should be nothing else but the glory of God and the refreshment of the spirit.” Johann Sebastian Bach

Overview

This unit gives students the freedom to choose and pursue their own path of specialisation in Music at their own level of ability, musical background, and experience. Solo Performance as an instrumentalist or a vocalist could be an area of focus for one student, while another may focus on Digital music creation. Some may choose to focus on Song Writing or Composition, while others may want to specialise in Group Performance (vocal, instrumental, Rock, Worship, or Classical), Music Technology, Film Music, or even Music Investigation on a topic of student’s choice. Students may choose this unit purely out of enjoyment and passion for their favourite area of Music. Also, through their own musical paths, students will greatly increase their level of musicianship and put themselves in a great position to possibly advance into VCE Music the following year, if so desired.

Aims

  • To enable students to develop a musical path of their own specialization and help them progress on their chosen paths
  • To further students’ ability to play an instrument and/or compose digital or traditional music
  • To foster confidence and enjoyment in performing, composing or researching
  • To analyse the use of musical elements in the creation of music
  • To become aware of the continual development in music technology and how it can be used to impact our society for the advancement of the Kingdom of Heaven
  • To develop a leadership role in Music at the school

Topics Include

  • Digital music software
  • Performance
  • Analyse musical styles and forms
  • Theory of Music
  • Aural

Time Allocation

  • 4 periods per cycle

Prerequisites

  • Must be able to sing or play an instrument or compose.

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Performance or Composition or Research task, Listening/written tests

“Praise the Lord, Praise God in his sanctuary; praise him in his mighty heavens. Praise him for his acts of power; praise him for his surpassing greatness. Praise him with the sounding of the trumpet, praise him with the harp and lyre, praise him with tambourine and dancing, praise him with the strings and flute, praise him with the clash of cymbals, praise him with resounding cymbals. Let everything that has breath praise the Lord. Praise the Lord” Psalm 150


 

SCIENCE: Extended Investigations In Science I & II Elective Subject [WS Year 10]

“The Christian faith of the early scientists gave them more than presuppositions; it also gave them motivation. They believed that in studying nature they were discovering the wisdom and power of the Creator and were thus honouring Him.” James F. Jekel

Overview

Students will undertake some guided experiments before designing their own in-depth investigation. They will apply matermatical models and current scientific theory to interpret their data and explain their finings. Students will be metored through the process, but will require motivation and self-direction. The course culminates with a formal presentation and celebration of student work.

Aim

  • To gain an appreciation of creation and to be better stewards of it.
  • To encourage skills of enquiry, hypothesis and testing
  • To promote an interest and understanding of the knowledge and processes of science
  • To understand both the benefits and limits of scientific inquiry
  • To encourage students to consider the ways in which people have used scientific knowledge and methods in the investigation of living creatures
  • To debate controversial scientific discoveries and applications using a biblical framework
  • To plan, design and perform experiments

Topics Include

The major disciplines of Science: Biology, Chemistry and Physics but may include:

  • Nanotechnology
  • Biochemistry
  • Space Science and Rocketry
  • Mechanics
  • Electricity, Light and Sound
  • Solar Energy/Alternative fuels

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Assignments / Project Work

“But ask the animals, and they will teach you, or the birds in the sky, and they will tell you; or speak to the earth, and it will teach you, or let the fish in the sea inform you. Which of all these does not know that the hand of the Lord has done this? In his hand is the life of every creature and the breath of all mankind.” Job 12:7-10


 

SCIENCE: Marine Biology I and II Elective Subject [WS Year 10]

“The Christian faith of the early scientists gave them more than presuppositions; it also gave them motivation. They believed that in studying nature they were discovering the wisdom and power of the Creator and were thus honouring Him.” James F. Jekel

Overview

As part of their learning, students will study the various forms of organisms that inhabit freshwater and marine habitats. From the smallest sea urchin to the largest shark, students will understand the features that assist classification of organisms into their various classes. The students will look at the features that make up freshwater and marine environments and study the of human impact such as overfishing as well as using aquaculture as a means of bringing families out of poverty. They will conduct various scientific practicals including dissections as well as a field trip to a marine habitat where they will use techniques for surveying aquatic organisms.

Aims

  • Investigate the current animal classification system
  • To expose students to university standards of a degree in Marine Biology/Zoology
  • Give an understanding of how scientists use data to assist management of natural resources
  • Demonstrate the effect that aquaculture can have on developing countries
  • Encourage God’s awesome creation of the underwater world

Topics Include

  • Characteristics of the animal classifications
  • Types of water bodies
  • Sharks and tracking devices
  • Conservation and sustainability
  • Aquaculture
  • Ecosystems

Time Allocation

  • 4 periods per cycle for Semester 1 and 2

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Booklist Items
  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Topic tests
  • Practical work and scientific journal
  • Poster presentation

“But ask the animals, and they will teach you, or the birds in the sky, and they will tell you; or speak to the earth, and it will teach you, or let the fish in the sea inform you. Which of all these does not know that the hand of the Lord has done this? In his hand is the life of every creature and the breath of all mankind.” Job 12:7-10

 

 

SPORTS SCIENCE: Body In Motion Elective Subject [WS Year 10]

“I lift up my eyes to the mountains - where does my help come from? My help comes from the Lord, the Maker of heaven and earth.” Psalm 121:1-2

Overview

Students explore the characteristics of the three major energy systems and their role in energy production. They will investigate the relative contribution and interplay of each energy system during performance in physical activity. Student discuss the uniqueness of the human body and its ability to perform under stress as an excellent celebration of our creator God.  Students explore the causes of fatigue and consider different strategies used to postpone fatigue and promote recovery. Students will participate in various practical classes where they will be required to analyse and apply their understanding of the energy systems, fatiguing factors and recovery strategies. They will explore a variety of methods to analyse skill frequencies, movement patterns, heart rates and work to rest ratios to determine the requirements of an activity. This information can be utilised to direct training and lead to improved performance. Students use a variety of tools and techniques to analyse movement skills and apply biomechanical principles to improve and refine movement patterns in physical activity, sport and exercise. They use practical activities to demonstrate how correct application of these principles can lead to improved performance in physical activity and sport.

Aims

  • To explore the characteristics of the three energy systems
  • To discuss the interplay of energy systems
  • To identify key factors responsible for causing fatigue
  • To apply appropriate physiological or dietary recovery strategy
  • To understand the various methods of data collection to aid activity analysis
  • To utilise data collection to direct training and improve performance
  • To understand biomechanical principles and their application in real life sporting activities
  • To undertake a biomechanical analysis to improve performance
  • To explore the role of biomechanics in improving safety and performance in sport

Topics Include

  • ATP-PC Energy System
  • Anaerobic Glycolysis Energy System
  • Aerobic Energy System
  • Fatiguing Factors
  • Recovery Strategies
  • Activity Analysis
  • Biomechanics. include: Newton’s Laws, Impulse, Projectile motion (Magnus), Momentum, Levers, Friction, Force and Stability

Time Allocation

  • 4 periods per cycle

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Energy Systems Test
  • Progressive Workbook Assignment
  • Reflective Folio of Participation in Practical Activities
  • Reflective folio of involvement in activity analysis practical sessions
  • Biomechanics Test
  • Research assignment on Biomechanical advancements in sport

“Do you not know that in a race all the runners run, but only one gets the prize? Run in such a way as to get the prize. Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever. Therefore I do not run like someone running aimlessly; I do not fight like a boxer beating the air. No, I strike a blow to my body and make it my slave so that after I have preached to others, I myself will not be disqualified for the prize.” 1 Corinthians 9:24-27

 

 

TEXTILES: Fashion Revolution Elective Subject [WS Year 10]

“In a small way human creative hands imitate this profusion of God, going beyond the minimum requirements of getting the job done. Creative hands are not content to spread on the frosting; they must make a tasteful arrangement of swirls and colour. They don’t just apply a coat of varnish; they polish the surface until it glows like satin. Creative hands do more than plant seeds; they place them in a tasteful and eye-pleasing garden arrangement.” LeRoy Koopman

Overview

Fashion Revolution is a unit that focuses on fashion design and the fashion industry through the lens of social justice. By looking at the fashion industry from both creative and social perspectives, students will be able to think much more critically about what constitutes as good design, as well as investigate how design can build towards a more sustainable future.

Students will discover how an item of clothing is manufactured, from raw materials all the way through to cut-make-trim, in order to critically analyse the process and generate ideas for improvements. Moreover, students will develop ways to integrate their research and understanding into everyday life (e.g. making decisions as consumers, advocating through social media, educating the public via YouTube).

Students will also learn the fundamentals of textile design, pattern and colour trends. They will create repeat pattern designs using both difital methods (Illustrator and Photoshop), and manual methods such as drawing and printmaking.

Aims

  • To develop critical and creative thinking skills about sustainable and ethical design
  • To understand the global impact that fashion and design has on people and the environment
  • To reflect upon our personal and social responsibility to advocate for social justice in every area of society
  • To explore how to use creativity to establish God’s kingdom on earth

Topics Include

  • Design process
  • Ethics and sustainability in fashion
  • Fashion design and garment construction
  • Sewing Machine
  • Repeat pattern design

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle Semester based

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Design folio and final presentation of upcycled piece
  • Projects
  • Research

Let the favor of the Lord our God be upon us; establish the work of our hands for us - Yes, establish the work of our hands. Psalm 90:17


 

VISUAL COMMUNICATION: Advertising Elective Subject [WS Year 10]

“In a small way human creative hands imitate this profusion of God, going beyond the minimum requirements of getting the job done. Creative hands are not content to spread on the frosting; they must make a tasteful arrangement of swirls and colour. They don’t just apply a coat of varnish; they polish the surface until it glows like satin. Creative hands do more than plant seeds; they place them in a tasteful and eye-pleasing garden arrangement.” LeRoy Koopman

Overview

Students examine how designers in the field of communication design capture the attention of their target audience. This leads to discussion around what God would want us to focus on and draw attention to in our personal lives and in the lives of others. Students apply particular techniques to their own visual designs and use digital applications for their final solutions. Individual creative responses are encouraged as students create typography-based designs and use manual drawing and printing in the development of particular work.

Aims

  • To develop skills in visual perception and communication through drawing
  • To research and find inspiration for design tasks
  • To develop an awareness of appropriate visual representation in design and marketing
  • To be able to effectively use design elements and principles, to learn software tools and apply this knowledge to design tasks
  • To develop analysis skills and visual communication terminology

Topics Include

  • Typography and layout
  • Look at advertisements
  • Manual printing in Design
  • Vector images in Design

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle Semester based

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Typography and layout
  • Analyses of advertisements
  • Manual methods and design
  • Digital methods and design

“Now son of man, take a clay tablet, put it in front of you and draw the city of Jerusalem on it”. Ezekiel 4:1


 

VISUAL COMMUNICATION: Architecture Elective Subject [WS Year 10]

“In a small way human creative hands imitate this profusion of God, going beyond the minimum requirements of getting the job done. Creative hands are not content to spread on the frosting; they must make a tasteful arrangement of swirls and colour. They don’t just apply a coat of varnish; they polish the surface until it glows like satin. Creative hands do more than plant seeds; they place them in a tasteful and eye-pleasing garden arrangement.” LeRoy Koopman

Overview

Students build on their awareness of how architects communicate ideas with a specific purpose, to a targeted audience, using different visual communication design practices and viewpoints. They discover that much inspiration comes from the creation and who we are is reflected in what we create. Students use visual communication design skills and learn creative thinking techniques, conventions and 3D construction processes in model making. A variety of environmental design tasks are undertaken which require experimentation and investigation using both digital and manual methods.

Aims

  • To develop visual thinking and expression through drawing
  • To develop an awareness of appropriate visual representation for different audiences
  • To incorporate effective use of design elements and principles in environmental design tasks
  • To be able to create three-dimensional models from two-dimensional drawings
  • ICT skills – Computer Aided Design (CAD) using Sketch up

Topics Include

  • Creative Thinking Techniques
  • Computer aided design
  • Model making
  • Designer research project

Time allocations

  • 5 periods per cycle Semester based

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Creative design and drawing tasks
  • Three-dimensional models
  • Research and Idea Generation
  • Oral Presentation
  • Creative thinking techniques
  • Environmental designers research
  • Architectural design
  • Model making

“Now son of man, take a clay tablet, put it in front of you and draw the city of Jerusalem on it”. Ezekiel 4:1


 

VCAL APPLIED LEARNING I and II Elective Subject [WS Year 10]

“The world is God’s epistle to mankind – His thoughts are flashing upon us from every direction” Plato (427-347 BC)

Overview

Precursor to VCAL

The concept of applied learning is often equated to ‘hands on’ or practical learning experiences. This broader definition advocates an approach that contextualises learning in a way that empowers and motivates students, while assisting them to develop key skills and knowledge required for employment, further education and active participation in their communities.

Aims

These key concepts underpin the following applied learning principles:

  • Start where students are at
  • Negotiate the curriculum. Engage in a dialogue with students about their curriculum
  • Share knowledge. Recognise the knowledge students bring to the learning environment
  • Connect with communities and real-life experiences
  • Build resilience, confidence and self-worth – consider the whole person
  • Integrate learning – the whole task and the whole person. In life we use a range of skills and knowledge
  • Learning should reflect the integration that occurs in real-life tasks
  • Promote diversity of learning styles and methods. Everyone learns differently. Accept that different learning styles require different learning or teaching methods, but value experiential, practical and ‘hands on’ ways of learning
  • Assess appropriately. Use the assessment method that best ‘fits’ the learning content and context
  • Prepare students for what is expected for VCAL in Year 11 and 12

Topics Include

  • Communication Skills - Presentations
  • Fundraising – Adopt a Cause
  • Hands On Learning – eg. Barista Certificate
  • Real Life Budgeting – Numeracy
  • Leadership
  • Student Directed Topics

Time allocations

  • 9 periods per cycle 

Prerequisites

  • None

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

Students will be assessed throughout the year with a combination of projects and activities.

"Listen to this, Job; stop and consider God's wonders. Job 37:14

 

 

VCE LANGUAGE: Chinese Elective Subject [WS Year 10]

“A man who is ignorant of foreign languages is ignorant of his own.” Johann Goethe

Overview

The study of a language other than English contributes to the overall education of students, most particularly in the area of communication, but also in the areas of cross-cultural understanding, intercultural learning, cognitive development, literacy and general knowledge.  It provides access to the culture of communities which use the language and promotes understanding of different attitudes and values within the wider Australian community and beyond. The ability to communicate in another language, in conjunction with other skills, may provide opportunities for employment in the fields of interpreting, social services, ethnic affairs, the tourism and hospitality industries, international relations, the arts, commerce, technology, science and education.

This study is designed to enable students to:

  • Use Chinese to communicate with others
  • Understand and appreciate the cultural contexts in which Chinese is used
  • Understand their own culture(s) through the study of other cultures
  • Understand language as a system
  • Make connections between Chinese and English, and/or other languages
  • Apply Chinese to work, further study, training or leisure

CONTENT

UNITS 1- 4: COMMON AREAS OF STUDY

  • The Individual: Personal world, Education and aspirations, Personal opinions and values
  • The Chinese-Speaking Communities: Lifestyles, Visiting China, Customs and traditions, Arts and entertainment, Stories from the past
  • The Changing World: Social issues, Environmental issues, Australian and Chinese relations, The world of work
  • Text Types: The student will be expected to be familiar with the various text types.  The student is expected to be familiar with, and be able to produce, the following five kinds of writing: Personal, Imaginative, Persuasive, Informative and Evaluative.

BIBLICAL PERSPECTIVE

Competence in language, both written and oral, is of vital importance in communicating the gospel.  The study of a LOTE should be more than simply memorizing words and structures, especially from a Christian perspective.  Effective communication in a second language takes place when there is a relationship based on levels of empathy and feelings allowing social discussion to effectively take place. Being familiar with phrases, structures, text types and appropriate relationship building strategies, allows us to join communicatively in God’s big vision of impacting people and communities, and seeking and saving the lost. The common worldwide issues we explore in VCE Chinese include: relationships, personal opinions and values, lifestyles, customs and traditions, as well as social and environmental change. Studying these topics and themes will further increase our students’ understanding of our responsibility to God and others in His world.

ASSESSMENT

UNITS 1 & 2

Students will be expected to be familiar with various text types for written and oral assessment.

Text types will be selected from: Advertisement, Article, Conversation, Discussion, Email, Editorial, Formal letter, Interview script, Invitation, Journal entry, Play/role play, Review, Recipe Report, Song, Speech, Story.

UNITS 3 & 4

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks Allocated*

Unit 3

Outcome 1

Express ideas through the production of original texts

 

Outcome 2

Analyse and use information from spoken texts

 

Outcome 3

Exchange information, opinions and experiences

 

Unit 4

Outcome 1

Analyse and use information from written texts

 

Outcome 2

Respond critically to spoken and written texts which reflect aspects of the language and culture of Chinese-speaking communities

 

Units 3 and 4

End of Year Oral examination

 

End of Year Written examination

A 250 word personal or imaginative written piece

10

A response to specific questions, messages or instructions, extracting and using the information requested

5

A three-four minute role-play, focusing on the resolution of an issue

10

A response to specific questions, messages or instructions, extracting and using information requested

5

(a) A 250–300 word informative, persuasive or evaluative, written response, for example, a report, comparison or review

10

AND

(b) A three-four minute interview on an issue related to the texts studied

10

Conversation

Discussion

12.5

Listening & Responding

Part A: Response in English

7.5

Part B: Response in Chinese

7.5

Reading & Responding

Part A: Response in English

10

Part B: Response in Chinese

5

Writing

7.5

TOTAL MARKS

100

*School-assessed coursework for Unit 3 contributes 25% to the study score

*School-assessed coursework for Unit 4 contributes 25% to the study score

“The Lord said, “If as one people speaking the same language they have begun to do this, then nothing they plan to do will be impossible for them. Come, let us go down and confuse their language so they will not understand each other.” That is why it was called Babel – because there the Lord confused the language of the whole world. From there the Lord scattered them over the face of the whole earth.” Genesis 11:6-7, 9


 

VCE DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY: Applied Computing Elective Subject [WS Year 10]

“God’s creative activity went far beyond the minimum requirements for getting the job done. Butterflies in the rain forest seldom seen by human eyes are creatures of breathtaking beauty. The delicate transparency of the man-of-war and the hummingbird’s wing are inimitable” Le Roy Koopman

Overview

This study enables students to:

  • Apply skills, techniques, processes and a methodology to create digital solutions that meet a range of needs and conditions
  • Understand how data can be represented in digital systems and structured and manipulated to become part of a digital solution
  • Become independent and discerning users of digital systems, able to critically appraise the opportunities and appropriateness of different digital systems in a range of settings
  • Understand the components of information systems and the architecture of the associated digital systems
  • Understand how digital systems, processes, legislation and personal behaviours can affect the integrity and security of data and information
  • Apply computational, design and systems thinking skills when creating digital solutions

CONTENT

UNIT 1: COMPUTING AREAS OF STUDY

Data And Graphic Solutions

In this area of study students conduct an investigation into an issue, practice or event and through the systematic collection, interpretation and manipulation of primary data they create a graphic solution, such as an infographic, that represents their findings. Examples of investigations include the social networking habits of people of different age groups, the heritage of a class of students to three generations and music preferences by genre and favourite artists within each. Graphic solutions could include charts, flowcharts, diagrams, images, hierarchies, animations, maps and timelines. Students develop and apply a detailed understanding of data, including its types, characteristics, sources and methods of acquisition. Relevant primary data is collected and then evaluated to determine its suitability for manipulation. When acquiring this data, students consider risks associated with using data owned by other people or organisations, and apply strategies and techniques for acknowledging legal requirements and ethical responsibilities.

Students apply computational thinking skills when extracting meaning from data and apply design thinking knowledge and skills to create graphic information for the purpose of informing, educating or persuading an audience. No restrictions are placed on the software tool used to create these solutions.

Networks

In this area of study students investigate how networks with wireless capability allow data and information to be exchanged locally and within the global environment. Students examine the hardware and software components and procedures required to connect and maintain a wireless network. They focus on ways in which the security of exchanged and stored data and information can be compromised in wireless networks, in order to understand ways of controlling the networked devices they use. Students apply this technical knowledge to create the design for a network with wireless capability that meets a need or opportunity, identifying its components and how data and information are transmitted. Students use a software tool to depict the components of their network and its interactions. When designing network solutions, students apply systems thinking by considering how users will interact with the network and the potential effects of the network on users and their data and information.

Collaboration And Communication

In this area of study students examine how the use of particular information systems within specified contexts can cause tensions and conflicts between different stakeholders. Students develop the ability to critically appraise how information systems are used and how individuals can be empowered to shape their use. Working in virtual (local, national, international) or face-to-face teams, students use web authoring software to create a website, designed for viewing on a mobile device, which presents an overview of an issue associated with one field. When designing their website students apply their knowledge of information architecture such as structuring sets of information to facilitate navigation and allowing users choices about levels of detail. They evaluate the merits of storing their website and its content in the cloud or on a private server. Project plans are prepared to support an organised approach to problem solving. Students use software to record tasks to be completed and team member responsibilities and schedules. Students record and monitor progress of the website development. Students do not have to use dedicated project management software. On their website students present the viewpoints of different stakeholders, drawing on evidence acquired from primary and/or secondary sources. They publish the team’s opinions about the issue and propose actions that can be taken to shape how information systems are used, for example, using social media to encourage actions or inviting comments in a forum. Students use visualising thinking tools to analyse content, online collaborative tools to support sharing of ideas, and techniques to assist in forming team opinions. They use other appropriate software to manipulate acquired data such as image, numeric, text and sound editing tools, and web authoring tools to communicate viewpoints.

UNIT 2: COMPUTING AREAS OF STUDY

Programming

In this area of study students focus on using a programming or scripting language that can support object-oriented programming to create working software modules. These languages provide users with greater flexibility than application software, as specific sets of instructions can be implemented to create solutions that are purpose designed. Flexibility exists regarding the specific language studied. Depending on its nature the language could also be used in Area of Study 2. Students develop skills in interpreting teacher-provided solution requirements and in designing working modules. They apply methods and techniques for completing a series of small discrete tasks or working modules that use features of a programming or scripting language, including predefined classes. They apply knowledge and skills associated with the design and development stages of the problem-solving methodology. Details of this methodology are on pages 14–16. Students also apply computational and design thinking skills when preparing design specifications and transforming them into working modules through the use of programming or scripting languages.

Data Analysis And Visualisation

In this area of study students learn to use software tools to access, select and, where appropriate, manipulate authentic data from large data repositories, and to present the key aspects of the data in an appropriate visual form. Once the data has been isolated and checked for its integrity, students create data visualisations that assist in reducing the complexity of data by using designs that illustrate patterns, connections and structure. These visualisations should minimise the effort required by readers to interpret complex data and they need to be clear, usable and relevant. Some data visualisation tools allow presentations to be dynamic and/or interactive. Appropriate visualisation forms include graphs, charts, spatial relationships, maps, histograms and network diagrams (nodes and edges). Sources of large data repositories include the Bureau of Meteorology, World Development Indicators, Australian Bureau of Statistics, United Nations, CSIRO, OECD. Appropriate tools to extract or structure data and create visualisations include a programming language, database software, spreadsheet software and data visualisation software. It is important that students engage in a two-step approach when creating visualisations: acquiring and preparing data (step one) and manipulating data into a visual form (step two). In response to teacher-provided design briefs, students apply all stages of the problem-solving methodology.

Data Management

In this area of study students are introduced to the structure of databases and their applicability in a range of settings. Databases underpin many applications such as borrowing and booking systems, medical records and social media websites. Students develop an understanding of the purposes of databases by exploring the data and information they supply to and receive from systems such as banking, membership, online purchasing and voting systems. They apply systems thinking skills when considering the effects of their interactions with information systems that use databases. Students develop and apply knowledge and skills in determining data types required to solve specific problems, and in organising and storing data. They examine the flexibility of databases by constructing query searches and sorts, and apply design principles that contribute to effective and efficient data collections tools, input forms and reports. Where appropriate, students apply mathematical calculations to the data and may create macros to automate repetitive tasks. Students devise a need or opportunity for a solution and collect relevant data for manipulation by database management software. This facilitates a deeper understanding of the benefits and risks associated with using database solutions. Students apply all stages of the problem-solving methodology.

BIBLICAL PERSPECTIVE

Students are to be responsible citizens in a global society. Christian character should be demonstrated in the way students collaborate and communicate using technology. They are to be ‘good workman’ in the creative use of the various tools that God has provided and be ‘wise as serpents’ in recognising and avoiding the dangers of technology while being as ‘harmless as doves’ in their personal use of technology.

"Listen to this, Job; stop and consider God's wonders. Job 37:14


 

VCE DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY: Media Studies Elective Subject [WS Year 10]

“God’s creative activity went far beyond the minimum requirements for getting the job done. Butterflies in the rain forest seldom seen by human eyes are creatures of breathtaking beauty. The delicate transparency of the man-of-war and the hummingbird’s wing are inimitable” Le Roy Koopman

Overview

We interact with the media every day, and the way we use the media is always changing.  The media influences the way in which people spend their time and how people perceive themselves and others, both positively and negatively.  This study encourages students to analyse and evaluate media products, production processes and policies through studying media forms which include traditional media forms such as radio, film, print media and television, as well as digital and social media.  This study encourages students to consider the media they consume and create with greater intentionality and thoughtfulness.

CONTENT

UNIT 1: MEDIA FORMS, REPRESENTATIONS AND AUSTRALIAN STORIES

In this unit, students develop an understanding of audiences and the core concepts underpinning the construction of representations and meaning in different media forms. They explore media codes and conventions and the construction of meaning in media products. Students analyse how representations, narrative and media codes and conventions contribute to the construction of the media realities audiences engage with and read. Students gain an understanding of audiences as producers and consumers of media products. They develop research skills to investigate and analyse selected narratives focusing on the influence of media professionals on production genre and style. Students develop an understanding of the features of Australian fictional and non-fictional narratives in different media forms. Students work in a range of media forms and develop and produce representations to demonstrate an understanding of the characteristics of each media form, and how they contribute to the communication of meaning.

Outcome 1: MEDIA REPRESENTATIONS

On completion of this unit, the student should be able to explain how media representations in a range of media products and forms, and from different periods of time, locations and contexts, are constructed, distributed, engaged with, consumed and read by audiences.

Outcome 2: MEDIA FORMS IN PRODUCTION

On completion of this unit, the student should be able to use the media production process to design, produce and evaluate media representations for specified audiences in a range of media forms.

Outcome 3: AUSTRALIAN STORIES

On completion of this unit the student should be able to analyse how the structural features of Australian fictional and non-fictional narratives in two or more media forms engage, and are consumed and read by, audiences.

UNIT 2: NARRATIVE ACROSS MEDIA FORMS

Fictional and non-fictional narratives are fundamental to the media and are found in all media forms. Media industries such as journalism and filmmaking are built upon the creation and distribution of narratives constructed in the form of a series of interconnected images, sounds and/or words, and using media codes and conventions. New media forms and technologies enable participants to design, create and distribute narratives in user-generated content, which challenges the traditional understanding of narrative form and content. In this unit, students further develop an understanding of the concept of narrative in media products and forms in different contexts. Narratives in both traditional and newer forms include film, television, sound, news, print, photography, games, and interactive digital forms. Students analyse the influence of developments in media technologies on individuals and society, examining in a range of media forms the effects of media convergence and hybridisation on the design, production and distribution of narratives in the media and audience engagement, consumption and reception. Students undertake production activities to design and create narratives that demonstrate an awareness of the structures and media codes and conventions appropriate to corresponding media forms.

Outcome 1: NARRATIVE, STYLE AND GENRE

On completion of this unit the student should be able to analyse the intentions of media creators and producers and the influences of narratives on the audience in different media forms.

Outcome 2: NARRATIVES IN PRODUCTION

On completion of this unit the student should be able to apply the media production process to create, develop and construct narratives.

Outcome 3: MEDIA AND CHANGE

On completion of this unit the student should be able to discuss the influence of new media technologies on society, audiences, the individual, media industries and institutions.

UNIT 3: MEDIA NARRATIVES AND PRE-PRODUCTION

AREAS OF STUDY

Narrative and Ideology

Narratives are fundamental to the relationship between the media and its audiences. Ideologies in society frame the nature, form and structure of narratives. Audiences and the media together frame the nature, form and development of discourses in society through the construction, distribution, reception and consumption of narratives that implicitly or explicitly comment on, reflect on, develop, reject or ignore ideologies. Media narratives are the product of creative and institutional practices that represent ideas through media codes and conventions. The use of media codes and conventions influences audience engagement, consumption and reading of narratives. Other influential factors include the social, cultural, ideological and institutional contexts relating to the period of time and location in which the media narrative was produced, the purpose of the media narrative, the genre, style, content, particulars of distribution and consumption and reception. Students examine fictional narratives in the form of two feature length films. On completion of this unit the student should be able to analyse how narratives are constructed and distributed, and how they engage, are consumed and are read by the intended audience and present day audiences.

Media Production Development

Media productions develop out of that which has come before. Media creators and producers frequently reference ideas and techniques that have been developed by others. Collecting, acknowledging and building upon ideas, structures, aesthetics and techniques informs the direction of media productions and an understanding of how audiences are engaged.

Students investigate and research a selected media form to inform the development of their proposed production. This research contributes to the direction of their production design. Students conduct an investigation of aspects of the media form in which they will work, developing knowledge of narrative, genre, style, media codes and conventions and aspects of the works of media practitioners relevant to their proposed production. Students develop production skills that inform the production, design and development of a media product. They record their learning in documented research, annotated production activities, experiments, exercises and reflections.

Media Production Design

Media production designs are a set of written and visual documents that detail the stages of production of a proposed product. The production design communicates both creative vision and thorough planning. Audience engagement consumption and reception is at the heart of media production. Audiences may be delineated by demographic or social factors, identified by their interests and experience in media works, forms, genres or styles, or created by media institutions or individual producers for a particular purpose. Detailed articulation of audience/s and how they will be engaged underpins all aspects of a media production design. Informed by their learning in Area of Study 2, students use industry specific design and planning, both in written and visual documentation, to complete a media production design. The design incorporates a clear fictional and/ or non-fictional narrative for a specified audience in a selected media form as outlined below. Students take into account the relevant media codes and conventions of the selected media form. The production design is developed for one of the following media forms:

  • A video or film production of 3–10 minutes in length
  • An animated production of no more than 10 minutes in length
  • A radio or an audio production of a minimum of 8 minutes in length.
  • A digital or an analogue photographic presentation, sequence or series of a minimum of 10 original sourced images shot, processed and edited by the student
  • A digital or traditional print production of a minimum of 8 pages produced and edited by the student

UNIT 4: MEDIA PRODUCTION AND ISSUES IN THE MEDIA

AREAS OF STUDY

Media Production

The production, post-production and distribution stages of a media product are a natural progression from the pre-production stage of the media production process. Students move from production into post-production where the manipulation, arrangement or layering of the ideas and material generated in pre-production and production leads to the realisation of their production design. Media creators and producers reflect on and work with others to gain insight into whether their products communicate their planned intent, refining their products in the production and post-production stages. Students undertake personal reflection and seek feedback on their work, developing, refining and resolving their product as a result. They document iterations of their production after considering the factors that have influenced the development, refinement of materials, technologies and processes, the resolution of ideas and the effect they have had on the final product. The creation and production of the media product is an individual undertaking. On completion of this unit the student should be able to produce, refine and resolve a media product designed in Unit 3.

Agency and Control in and of the media

The relationship between the media and audiences has never been more complex. The contemporary media landscape poses issues and challenges for the way that academics and commentators have traditionally theorised the nature of communication. The media has always been considered to have the capacity to influence, but now the balance of power is shifting and arguments around who influences who have become highly contested. The media and its audiences are now both thought to exercise agency; the capacity to act and exert power. Today the media not only produces and distributes content to audiences, it also generates and sustains social networks, which have, in turn, enabled new modes of production, distribution, consumption and reception based on the sharing of commercial and user-generated content. As the media increasingly crosses national borders, governments struggle to maintain control over the laws and policies created for their jurisdictions. These issues pose challenges for managing and regulating the use of the media by globalised media institutions, governments and the individual. On completion of this unit the student should be able to discuss issues of agency and control in the relationship between the media and its audience.

BIBLICAL PERSPECTIVE

The media's influence upon society has been profound.  In teaching students to analyse and evaluate the media, this study encourages students to critically examine the media from a Christian worldview. God has also designed us to be creative beings, and students are encouraged to use their God-given creativity to produce thoughtful, inspired media products.

ASSESSMENT

UNITS 1 & 2

Assessment tasks are selected from: Audiovisual or video sequences, Radio or audio sequences, Photographs, Print layouts, Sequences or presentations using digital technologies, Posters, Written responses,Oral reports

UNIT 3

School-Assessed Coursework

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks Allocated*

Outcome 1

Analyse how narratives are constructed and distributed, and how they engage, are consumed and are read by the intended audience and present day audiences.

  • Short responses
  • Structured questions

40

TOTAL MARKS

40

*School–assessed coursework for Unit 3 contributes 10% to the study score

School-Assessed Task

Outcomes

Components of the school-assessed task

Marks Allocated

Outcome 2

Research aspects of a media form and experiment with media technologies and media production processes to inform and document the design of a media production.

  • A research portfolio and accompanying documentation examining aspects of the selected media form
  • Production exercises with accompanying documentation that demonstrate a range of skills in the use of media technologies and production processes relevant to the student selected media form

The School-assessed Task for Units 3 and 4 will contribute 40% to the study score

Outcome 3

Develop and document a media production design in a selected media form for a specified audience.

A media production design plan based on the selected media form identified in Unit 3, Outcome 2.

The School-assessed Task for Units 3 and 4 will contribute 40% to the study score

UNIT 4

School-Assessed Coursework

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks Allocated*

Outcome 2

Discuss issues of agency and control in the relationship between the media and its audience.

  • Short responses
  • Structured questions

40

TOTAL MARKS

40

*School –assessed coursework for Unit 4 contributes 10% to the study score

School-Assessed Task

Outcomes

Components of the school-assessed task

Marks allocated

Unit 4

Outcome 1

Produce, refine and resolve a media product for an identified audience from the media production design plan prepared by the student in Unit 3

A media product developed from the media production design produced in Unit 3

The School-assessed Task for Units 3 and 4 will contribute 40% to the study score

EXTERNAL ASSESSMENT

The level of achievement for Units 3 and 4 is also assessed by an end-of-year examination, which will contribute 40%

"Listen to this, Job; stop and consider God's wonders. Job 37:14


 

VCE HEALTH: Health and Human Development Elective Subject [WS Year 10]

“The world would have us believe that winning or success is measured by points on a scoreboard or by dollar signs. The Christian realises that winning or success is determined by whether or not a goal has been achieved, and that goal is to bring glory to God.” Thomas M. Boqdon

Overview

This study is designed to enable students to:

  • Understand the complex nature of health and wellbeing, and human development
  • Develop a broad view of health and wellbeing, incorporating physical, social, emotional, mental and spiritual dimensions, and biological, sociocultural and environmental factors
  • Examine how health and wellbeing may be influenced across the lifespan by the conditions into which people are born, grow, live, work and age
  • Develop health literacy to evaluate health information and take appropriate and positive action to support health and wellbeing and manage risks
  • Develop understanding of the Australian healthcare system and the political and social values that underpin it
  • Apply social justice principles to identify health and wellbeing inequities and analyse health and wellbeing interventions
  • Apply the objectives of the united nations’ sustainable development goals to evaluate the effectiveness of health and wellbeing initiatives and programs
  • Propose and implement action to positively influence health and wellbeing, and human development, outcomes at individual, local, national and/or global levels

CONTENT

UNIT 1: UNDERSTANDING HEALTH AND WELLBEING

AREAS OF STUDY

Health perspectives and influences

This area of study takes a broad, multidimensional approach to health and wellbeing. Such an approach acknowledges that defining and measuring these concepts is complicated by a diversity of social and cultural contexts. Students consider the influence of age, culture, religion, gender and socioeconomic status on perceptions of and priorities relating to health and wellbeing. They look at measurable indicators of population health, and at data reflecting the health status of Australians. With a focus on youth, students enquire into reasons for variations and inequalities in health status, including sociocultural factors that contribute to variations in health behaviours.

Health and nutrition

This area of study explores food and nutrition as foundations for good health and wellbeing. Students investigate the roles and sources of major nutrients and the use of food selection models and other tools to promote healthy eating. They look at the health and wellbeing consequences of dietary imbalance, especially for youth, and consider the social, cultural and political factors that influence the food practices of and food choices made by youth. They develop strategies for building health literacy and evaluating nutrition information from various sources, including advertisements and social media.

Youth health and wellbeing

In this area of study students focus on the health and wellbeing of Australia’s youth, and conduct independent research into a selected area of interest. Students identify major health inequalities among Australia’s youth and reflect on the causes. They apply research skills to find out what young people are most focused on and concerned about with regard to health and wellbeing. Students inquire into how governments and organisations develop and implement youth health programs, and consider the use of health data and the influence of community values and expectations. Students select a particular focus area and conduct research, interpret data and draw conclusions on how the health and wellbeing of Australia’s youth can be promoted and improved.

UNIT 2: MANAGING HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENT

AREAS OF STUDY

Developmental transitions

This area of study examines the developmental transitions from youth to adulthood, with a focus on expected changes, significant decisions, and protective factors, including behaviours. Students consider perceptions of what it means to be a youth and an adult and investigate the expected physical and social changes. They inquire into factors that influence both the transition from youth to adulthood and later health status. They consider the characteristics of respectful, healthy relationships. Students examine parenthood as a potential transition in life. With a focus on the influence of parents/carers and families, students investigate factors that contribute to development, health and wellbeing during the prenatal, infancy and early childhood stages of the lifespan. Health and wellbeing is considered as an intergenerational concept (that is, the health and wellbeing of one generation affects the next).

Health Care in Australia

This area of study investigates the health system in Australia. Students examine the functions of various entities that play a role in our health system. They inquire into equity of access to health services, as well as the rights and responsibilities of individuals receiving care. Students research the range of health services in their communities and suggest how to improve health and wellbeing outcomes and health literacy in Australia. They explore a range of issues associated with the use of new and emerging health procedures and technologies such as reproductive technologies, artificial intelligence, robotics, nanotechnology, three-dimensional printing of body parts and use of stem cells.

UNIT 3: AUSTRALIA’S HEALTH IN A GLOBALISED WORLD

AREAS OF STUDY

Understanding health and wellbeing

This area of study explores health and wellbeing and illness as complex, dynamic and subjective concepts. While the major focus is on the health of Australians, this area of study also emphasises that Australia’s health is not isolated from the rest of the world. Students inquire into the WHO’s prerequisites for health and wellbeing and reflect on both the universality of public health goals and the increasing influence of global conditions on Australians. Students develop their understanding of the indicators used to measure and evaluate health status, and the factors that contribute to variations between population groups in Australia.

Promoting health and wellbeing

This area of study looks at different approaches to public health over time, with an emphasis on changes and strategies that have succeeded in improving health and wellbeing. Students examine the progression of public health in Australia since 1900, noting global changes and influences such as the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion and the general transition of focus from the health and wellbeing of individuals to that of populations. Students investigate the Australian health system and its role in promoting health and wellbeing. They conduct a detailed study on a successful health promotion campaign or program, and inquire into priorities for health improvements in Australia.

UNIT 4: HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN A GLOBAL CONTEXT

AREAS OF STUDY

Health and wellbeing in a global context

This area of study looks at similarities and differences in major burdens of disease in low- , middle- and high-income countries, including Australia. Students investigate a range of factors that contribute to health inequalities and study the concepts of sustainability, human development and the Human Development Index to further their understanding of health in a global context. Students consider the global reach of product marketing and inquire into the effects of particular global trends on health and wellbeing.

Health and the Sustainable Development Goals

This area of study looks at action for promoting health globally. It looks at the rationale, objectives and interdependencies of the UN’s SDGs, focusing on their promotion of health and wellbeing and human development. Students investigate the priorities and work of the WHO and evaluate Australia’s aid program and the role of non-government organisations, selecting one aid program for detailed research and analysis. They reflect on meaningful and achievable individual actions that could contribute to the work of national and international organisations that promote health and wellbeing.

BIBLICAL PERSPECTIVE

1 Corinthians 6:19 – 20 “Or didn't you realize that your body is a sacred place, the place of the Holy Spirit? Don't you see that you can't live however you please; squandering what God paid such a high price for? The physical part of you is not some piece of property belonging to the spiritual part of you. God owns the whole works. So let people see God in and through your body.” (The Message translation)

The central focus of the Health and Human Development study is to examine the factors that promote wellbeing in individuals, families and the community. This study aims to develop an understanding of the relationship between health and the various aspects of human development. It incorporates the truth that all life originates in God and that our health and wellbeing are important to Him as our Creator. The study explores the physical, social, emotional and mental aspects of health and development, beginning with the individual and progressing to family, local community and finally to the global stage. With the change in values in our society, students will be challenged to assess their responsibilities, and those of the community, in considering God’s word and developing a sense of stewardship and positive interaction for self, family and the community. This study recognises that health and human development are influenced by lifestyle, environment, behaviour, politics, genetics and many other factors and the way these factors interact. It is hoped that students will learn to analyse and filter the information presented to them in a godly way and begin to use these principles to influence our society.

ASSESSMENT

UNITS 1 & 2

All assessments at Units 1 and 2 are school-based. Procedures for assessment of levels of achievement in Units 1 and 2 are a matter for school decision. Suitable tasks for assessment in this unit may be selected from the following:

  • A short written report, such as a media analysis, a research inquiry, a blog or a case study analysis
  • Oral presentation, such as a debate or a podcast
  • A visual presentation such as a graphic organiser, a concept/mind map, an annotated poster, a digital presentation
  • Structured questions, including data analysis

UNIT 3

School-assessed Coursework for Unit 3 will contribute 25% to the study score.

UNIT 4

School-assessed Coursework for Unit 4 will contribute 25% to the study score.

EXTERNAL ASSESSMENT

The level of achievement for Units 3 and 4 is also assessed by an end-of-year examination. The examination will contribute 50%.

“Do you not know that in a race all the runners run, but only one gets the prize? Run in such a way as to get the prize. Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever. Therefore I do not run like someone running aimlessly; I do not fight like a boxer beating the air. No, I strike a blow to my body and make it my slave so that after I have preached to others, I myself will not be disqualified for the prize.” 1 Corinthians 9:24-27

 

 

VCE HEALTH: Outdoor and Environmental Studies Elective Subject [WS Year 10]

“The world would have us believe that winning or success is measured by points on a scoreboard or by dollar signs. The Christian realises that winning or success is determined by whether or not a goal has been achieved, and that goal is to bring glory to God.” Thomas M. Boqdon

Overview

This study is designed to enable students to:

  • Develop experiential relationships with, and knowledge of, outdoor environments
  • Develop an understanding of the ecological, historical, economic and social factors that have affected and will continue to affect outdoor environments over time
  • Develop skills, knowledge and behaviours that promote safe and sustainable interaction with outdoor environments
  • Identify and analyse the strategies used to protect, conserve and manage outdoor environments in a sustainable manner
  • Understand the implications of increasing awareness of sustainable environmental relationships
  • Critically analyse interactions with outdoor environments in shaping Australian cultural practices

CONTENT

UNIT 1: EXPLORING OUTDOOR EXPERIENCES AREAS OF STUDY

Motivations for outdoor experiences

In this area of study students examine motivations for and responses to nature and outdoor experiences. They investigate a range of contemporary uses and meanings of the term ‘nature’, and examine a variety of different types of outdoor environments. Students are introduced to a cultural perspective on the ways humans relate to outdoor environments. Students learn to participate safely in outdoor experiences and develop relevant practical skills including first aid to enable safe participation in practical experiences. Students use these experiences as the basis for reflection.

Influences on outdoor experiences

This area of study focuses on planning and participating in outdoor experiences. Students evaluate how their personal responses are influenced by media portrayals of outdoor environments and perceptions of risk involved in outdoor experiences. Practical outdoor experiences provide students with the opportunity to observe and experience various ways of encountering and understanding outdoor environments. Students consider factors that affect access to outdoor experiences and explain the effect of different technologies on outdoor experiences, examining how all of these influence the ways humans understand nature.

UNIT 2: DISCOVERING OUTDOOR ENVIRONMENTS

AREAS OF STUDY

Investigating outdoor environments

This area of study introduces students to the characteristics of a variety of outdoor environments, including those visited during practical outdoor experiences. Students investigate different types of outdoor environments from a number of perspectives. Students undertake case studies of different types of outdoor environments to observe and experience how changes to nature affect people. They develop appropriate practical skills for safe and sustainable participation in outdoor experiences and for investigations into various outdoor environments. Students use these experiences as the basis for reflection and analysis of theoretical knowledge of natural environments.

Impacts on outdoor environments

This area of study focuses on the human activities undertaken in outdoor environments and their impacts on those environments. Although environmental impacts include both natural and human-induced changes on components of the environment, the focus here is on the impacts of humans – both positive and negative. Students investigate and model individual and group responsibilities for activities in outdoor environments, including community-based environmental action to promote positive impacts on outdoor environments. Practical outdoor experiences enable students to develop skills related to minimal impact travelling and living, and to experience the impact of technology on outdoor environments. Students use these experiences as the basis for reflection and for analysis of theoretical knowledge about the effects of natural and human-induced impacts on outdoor environments.

UNIT 3: RELATIONSHIPS WITH OUTDOOR ENVIRONMENTS

AREAS OF STUDY

Historical relationships with outdoor environments

This area of study explores how Australians have understood and interacted with outdoor environments over time. Students examine the unique nature of Australian outdoor environments and investigate a range of human relationships with outdoor environments, from various Indigenous cultural experiences, through to the influence of a number of major historical events and issues subsequent to European settlement. Case studies are used to analyse the role of environmental movements in changing human relationships with outdoor environments. Students study the foundation and role of environmental and political movements in changing relationships with outdoor environments and the subsequent effects of these on environmental politics. Students engage in practical outdoor experiences that enable them to investigate human relationships with specific outdoor environments.

Relationships with Australian environments since 1990

In this area of study students examine relationships between humans and outdoor environments since 1990. They examine a number of ways outdoor environments are depicted in different media. The dynamic nature of relationships between humans and their environment are considered, as well as the social, cultural, economic and political factors that influence these relationships. Students engage in practical outdoor experiences that enable them to collect information about, reflect on and analyse relationships with outdoor environments since 1990

UNIT 4: SUSTAINABLE OUTDOOR RELATIONSHIPS

AREAS OF STUDY

Healthy outdoor environments

This area of study explores the contemporary state of outdoor environments in Australia and the importance of outdoor environments for individuals and society. Students examine the nature of sustainability and use observations to evaluate the health of outdoor environments. They investigate current and potential damage to outdoor environments and the subsequent impacts. Practical outdoor experiences enable students to further develop and apply their practical knowledge and skills for safe and sustainable interaction with outdoor environments.

Sustainable outdoor environments

In this area of study students focus on the sustainability of environments to support the future needs of ecosystems, individuals and society, and the skills needed to be an environmentally responsible citizen. Students investigate at least two case studies of conflict over uses of outdoor environments and develop a clear understanding of the methods and processes commonly used to resolve these conflicts.

Students develop an understanding that management strategies, together with acts and conventions, contribute to maintaining the health and sustainability of outdoor environments in contemporary Australian society.

Students use their outdoor experiences to reflect on the actions taken by individuals and groups in contemporary Australia to maintain the health of outdoor environments.

BIBLICAL PERSPECTIVE

For students to guard over and appreciate God’s incredible creation, by monitoring and investigating particular features and their environments. Genesis 1:26 Then God said “Let us make man in our image in our likeness and let them rule over the fish of the sea and birds of the air, over the livestock, over the earth, and over all the creatures that move along the ground”.

ASSESSMENT

UNITS 1 & 2

All assessments at Units 1 and 2 are school-based. Procedures for assessment of levels of achievement in Units 1 and 2 are a matter for school decision. The major assessment task for this unit is a journal or report demonstrating links between theoretical content studied and practical experiences undertaken. Additionally, at least one task for assessment of each outcome is to be selected from the following:

  • A case study
  • An oral presentation including the use of multimedia and podcasts
  • Data analysis
  • Structured questions
  • Written responses, including essays and web discussion forums

UNIT 3

School-assessed Coursework for Unit 3 will contribute 25% to the study score.

UNIT 4

School-assessed Coursework for Unit 4 will contribute 25% to the study score

EXTERNAL ASSESSMENT

The level of achievement for Units 3 and 4 is also assessed by an end-of-year examination. The examination will contribute 50%

“Do you not know that in a race all the runners run, but only one gets the prize? Run in such a way as to get the prize. Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever. Therefore I do not run like someone running aimlessly; I do not fight like a boxer beating the air. No, I strike a blow to my body and make it my slave so that after I have preached to others, I myself will not be disqualified for the prize.” 1 Corinthians 9:24-27

 

 

VCE HUMANITIES: Business Management Elective Subject [WS Year 10]

“In a small way human creative hands imitate this profusion of God, going beyond the minimum requirements of getting the job done. Creative hands are not content to spread on the frosting; they must make a tasteful arrangement of swirls and colour. They don’t just apply a coat of varnish; they polish the surface until it glows like satin. Creative hands do more than plant seeds; they place them in a tasteful and eye-pleasing garden arrangement.” LeRoy Koopman

Overview

As the Christian leaders of tomorrow, both in the church and in business, it is important that our students have a strong understanding of what it means to lead and manage. Business Management examines the ways in which people at various levels within a business organisation manage resources to achieve the objectives of the organisation. The study recognises that there is a range of management theories. In each unit students examine some of these theories and, through exposure to real business scenarios and direct contact with business, compare them with management in practice.

CONTENT

Businesses of all sizes are major contributors to the economic and social wellbeing of a nation. Therefore, how businesses are formed and the fostering of conditions under which new business ideas can emerge are vital for a nation’s wellbeing. Taking a business idea and planning how to make it a reality are the cornerstones of economic and social development. In this unit students explore the factors affecting business ideas and the internal and external environments within which businesses operate, and the effect of these on planning a business.

UNIT 1: PLANNING A BUSINESS

AREAS OF STUDY

The Business Idea

In this area of study students investigate how business ideas are created and how conditions can be fostered for new business ideas to emerge. New business ideas are formed through a range of sources, such as identifying a gap in the market, technological developments and changing customer needs. Students explore some of the issues that need to be considered before a business can be established.

External Environment

The external environment consists of all elements outside a business that may act as pressures or forces on the operations of a business. Students consider factors from the external environment such as legal, political, social, economic, technological, global and corporate social responsibility factors and the effects these may have on the decisions made when planning a business. Students investigate how the internal environment relates to the external environment and the effects of this relationship on planning a business.

Internal Environment

The internal environment affects the approach to and success of business planning. The owner will generally have more control over the activities, functions and pressures that occur within a business. These factors, such as business models, legal business structures and staffing, will also be influenced to some extent by the external environment. Students explore the factors within the internal environment and consider how planning decisions may have an effect on the ultimate success of a business.

UNIT 2: ESTABLISHING A BUSINESS

AREAS OF STUDY

Legal Requirements And Financial Considerations

It is essential to deal with legal and financial matters when establishing a business. In this area of study students are introduced to the legal requirements and financial considerations that are vital to establishing a business. They also consider the implications for the business if these requirements are not met.

Marketing a Business

Establishing a strong customer base for a business is an important component of success. In this area of study students develop their understanding that marketing encompasses a wide range of management practices, from identifying the needs of the target market and establishing a brand presence, through to considerations on price, product features and packaging, promotion, place, people, physical evidence and processes. They also consider effective public relations strategies and the benefits and costs these can bring to a business.

Staffing a Business

Staff are one of the business’s greatest assets and are an important consideration when establishing a business. The quantity and quality of staff has a direct link to business productivity and the achievement of business objectives. In this area of study students examine the staffing requirements that will meet the needs and objectives of the business and contribute to productivity and effectiveness. They research the processes undertaken by the business with relation to the recruitment, selection and induction of staff. Students consider the opportunities that the skills and capabilities of staff can contribute to the business, the legal obligations that must be addressed and the relationship between employers and employees within a business.

UNIT 3: MANAGING A BUSINESS

AREAS OF STUDY

Business Foundations

This area of study introduces students to the key characteristics of businesses and their stakeholders. Students investigate potential conflicts between and the different demands of stakeholders on a business. They examine a range of management styles and management skills that may be used when managing a business and apply these to contemporary business case studies.

Managing Employees

In this area of study students investigate essential factors such as motivation and training involved in effectively managing employees during their time at a business to ensure the business objectives are achieved. They consider Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, Locke and Latham’s Goal Setting Theory and Lawrence and Nohria’s Four Drive Theory of motivation. Using the theories and motivation strategies, students propose and justify possible solutions to employee management in contemporary business case studies. Students gain an overview of workplace relations, including the main participants and their roles in the dispute resolution process.

Operations Management

The production of goods and services is the core objective of businesses. Effective management of the process of transforming inputs into outputs is vital to the success of a business, both in terms of maximising the efficiency and effectiveness of the production process and meeting the needs of stakeholders. In this area of study students examine operations management and consider the best and most responsible use of available resources for the production of a quality final good or service in a competitive, global environment.

UNIT 4: TRANSFORMING A BUSINESS

AREAS OF STUDY

Reviewing Performance – The Need For Change

In this area of study students develop their understanding of the need for change. Managers regularly review and evaluate business performance through the use of key performance indicators and use the results to make decisions concerning the future of a business. Managers can take both a proactive and reactive approach to change. Students investigate the ways a business can search for new business opportunities as a source of future business growth and consider current forces for change on a business. They apply Lewin’s Force Field Analysis theory to contemporary case studies and consider approaches to strategic management, using Porter’s (1985) Generic Strategies.

Implementing Change

In this area of study students explore how businesses respond to evaluation data. It is important for managers to know where they want a business to be positioned for the future before implementing a variety of strategies to bring about the desired change. Students consider the importance of leadership in change management, how leaders can inspire change and the effect change can have on the stakeholders in a business. They consider the principles of Senge’s Learning Organisation and apply the Three Step Change Model (Lewin) in implementing change in a business. Using a contemporary business case study from the past four years, students evaluate business practice against theory, considering how corporate social responsibility can be incorporated into the change process.

ASSESSMENT UNITS 1 & 2

Suitable tasks for assessment may be selected from the following:

  • A case study analysis
  • A business research report
  • Development of a business plan and/or feasibility study
  • An interview and a report on contact with business
  • A school-based, short-term business activity
  • A business simulation exercise
  • An essay
  • A business survey and analysis
  • A media analysis
  • Report (written, visual, oral)

BIBLICAL PERSPECTIVE

Biblical leadership principles are examined as students consider the application of management styles and skills to their own lives and to possible careers in a business environment. In addition, students will evaluate social responsibility and ethics in examining change in large organisations. The application of conflict resolution strategies (see Matt 18:15 and 1 Corinthians 6) will be considered. God has created us to be in relationship both with Himself and with our fellow human beings. Therefore, students must consider how strong, Christ-centred relationships can be developed and maintained as an integral part of harmonious interactions within the business organisation.

ASSESSMENT

UNIT 1

Assessment tasks for these units are selected from the following:

  • Case study analysis
  • Business research (print and online)
  • Development of a marketing and/or public relations plan
  • Interview and report on contact with business
  • Business simulation exercise
  • Essay
  • Test
  • Computer applications and simulations
  • Business survey and analysis
  • Analytical exercises
  • Media analysis
  • Report (written, visual, oral)

UNIT 3

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks Allocated*

Outcome 1

Discuss the key characteristics of businesses and stakeholders, and analyse the relationship between corporate culture, management styles and management skills.

The student’s performance on each outcome is assessed using one or more of the following:

  • a case study
  • structured questions
  • an essay
  • a report
  • a media analysis

20

Outcome 2

Explain theories of motivation and apply them to a range of contexts, and analyse and evaluate strategies related to the management of employees.

 

40

Outcome 3

Analyse the relationship between business objectives and operations management, and propose and evaluate strategies to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of business operations.

 

40

TOTAL MARKS

100

*School-assessed coursework for Unit 3 contributes 25%

 

UNIT 4

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks Allocated*

Outcome 1

Explain the way business change may come about, use key performance indicators to analyse the performance of a business, discuss the driving and restraining forces for change and evaluate management strategies to position a business for the future.

The student’s performance on each outcome is assessed using one or more of the following:

  • a case study
  • structured questions
  • an essay
  • a report
  • a media analysis

50

Outcome 2

Evaluate the effectiveness of a variety of strategies used by managers to implement change and discuss the effect of change on the stakeholders of a business.

 

50

TOTAL MARKS

100

*School-assessed coursework for Unit 4 contributes 25%

“Do you not know that in a race all the runners run, but only one gets the prize? Run in such a way as to get the prize. Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever. Therefore I do not run like someone running aimlessly; I do not fight like a boxer beating the air. No, I strike a blow to my body and make it my slave so that after I have preached to others, I myself will not be disqualified for the prize.” 1 Corinthians 9:24-27

 

 

VCE HUMANITIES: Legal Studies Elective Subject [WS Year 10]

“In a small way human creative hands imitate this profusion of God, going beyond the minimum requirements of getting the job done. Creative hands are not content to spread on the frosting; they must make a tasteful arrangement of swirls and colour. They don’t just apply a coat of varnish; they polish the surface until it glows like satin.  Creative hands do more than plant seeds; they place them in a tasteful and eye-pleasing garden arrangement.” LeRoy Koopman

Overview

If Christians are to be educated for service and witness in the world, some knowledge of the political and legal systems which seek to control our society is essential. This course introduces students to the Australian legal system with a view to encouraging interest and a sense of Christian responsibility in these fundamental structures of our community.

CONTENT

UNIT 1:  GUILT AND LIABILITY

AREAS OF STUDY

Legal Foundations

This area of study provides students with foundational knowledge of laws and the Australian legal system. Students explore the role of individuals, laws and the legal system in achieving social cohesion and protecting the rights of individuals. Students consider the characteristics of an effective law, and sources and types of law. They examine the relationship between parliament and the courts, and the reasons for a court hierarchy in Victoria, and develop an appreciation of the principles of justice.

The Presumption of Innocence

The presumption of innocence is the fundamental principle of criminal law and provides a guarantee that an accused is presumed innocent until proven guilty beyond reasonable doubt. In this area of study students develop an understanding of key concepts in criminal law and types of crime, and investigate two criminal offences in detail. For each offence, students consider actual and/or hypothetical scenarios in which an accused has been charged with the offence, use legal reasoning to determine possible culpability and explain the impact of the offence on individuals and society.

Civil Liability

Civil law aims to protect the rights of individuals, groups and organisations, and provides opportunities for a wronged party to seek redress for a breach of civil law. In this area of study students develop an understanding of key concepts in civil law and investigate two areas of civil law in detail. Possible areas of civil law could include negligence, defamation, nuisance, trespass and contracts. For each area of civil law, students consider actual and/or hypothetical scenarios giving rise to a civil claim, apply legal reasoning to determine possible liability for a breach of civil law and explain the impact of a breach of civil law on the parties.

UNIT 2:  SANCTIONS, REMEDIES AND RIGHTS

AREAS OF STUDY

Sanctions

The criminal justice system determines the guilt or otherwise of an accused, and imposes sanctions on a guilty person. In this area of study students investigate key concepts in the determination of a criminal case, including the institutions that enforce criminal law, and the purposes and types of sanctions and approaches to sentencing. Through an investigation of two criminal cases from the past four years, either decided or still being decided, students explore the extent to which the principles of justice were or could be achieved.

Remedies

Remedies may be available to a wronged party where there has been a breach of civil law. In this area of study students develop an appreciation of key concepts in the resolution of a civil case, including the methods used and institutions available to resolve disputes, and the purposes and types of remedies. Through an investigation of two civil cases from the past four years, either decided or still being decided, students explore the extent to which the principles of justice were or could be achieved.

Rights

The protection of rights is fundamental to a democratic society. Rights are protected in Australia through the Australian Constitution, the Victorian Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities and through common law and statute law such as through statutes relating to racial discrimination, sex discrimination and equal opportunity. In this area of study students examine the ways in which rights are protected in Australia and compare this approach with that of another country.

UNIT 3: RIGHTS AND JUSTICE

AREAS OF STUDY

The Victorian Criminal Justice System

The Victorian criminal justice system is used to determine whether an accused person is guilty beyond reasonable doubt of an offence for which they are charged, and to impose sanctions where guilt has been found or pleaded. The system involves a range of institutions including courts (the Magistrates’ Court, County Court and Supreme Court) and others available to assist an accused. In this area of study students explore the criminal justice system, its range of personnel and institutions and the various means it uses to determine a criminal case. Students investigate the rights of the accused and of victims, and explore the purposes and types of sanctions and sentencing considerations. Students consider factors that affect the ability of the criminal justice system to achieve the principles of justice. They examine recent reforms from the past four years and recommended reforms to enhance the ability of the criminal justice system to achieve the principles of justice. Students synthesise and apply legal principles and information relevant to the criminal justice system to actual and/or hypothetical scenarios.

The Victorian Civil Justice System

The Victorian civil justice system aims to restore a wronged party to the position they were originally in before the breach of civil law occurred. The system involves a range of institutions to resolve a civil dispute, including courts (the Magistrates’ Court, County Court and Supreme Court), complaints bodies and tribunals. In this area of study students consider the factors relevant to commencing a civil claim, examine the institutions and methods used to resolve a civil dispute and explore the purposes and types of remedies. Students consider factors that affect the ability of the civil justice system to achieve the principles of justice. They examine recent reforms from the past four years and recommended reforms to enhance the ability of the civil justice system to achieve the principles of justice. Students synthesise and apply legal principles and information relevant to the civil justice system to actual and/or hypothetical scenarios.

UNIT 4: THE PEOPLE AND THE LAW

AREAS OF STUDY

The People and the Australian Consititution

The Australian Constitution establishes Australia’s parliamentary system and provides mechanisms to ensure that parliament does not make laws beyond its powers. In this area of study students examine the relationship between the Australian people and the Australian Constitution and the ways in which the Australian Constitution acts as a check on parliament in law-making. Students investigate the involvement of the Australian people in the referendum process and the role of the High Court in acting as the guardian of the Australian Constitution

The People, the Parliament and the Courts

Parliament is the supreme law-making body, and courts have a complementary role to parliament in making laws. Courts can make laws through the doctrine of precedent and through statutory interpretation when determining cases. In this area of study students investigate factors that affect the ability of parliament and courts to make law. They examine the relationship between parliament and courts in law-making and consider the capacity of both institutions to respond to the need for law reform. In exploring the influences on law reform, students draw on examples of individuals and the media, as well as examples from the past four years of law reform bodies recommending legislative change.

BIBLICAL PERSPECTIVE

Legal Studies purposes to:

  • Cultivate a reasoned and compassionate outlook on social and political behaviour based on Christian principles
  • Encourage a responsibility to, and involvement in, political and social activity which effectively promotes Biblical values while respecting the rights, opinions and interpretations of others
  • Show the difficulties involved in applying God’s absolute standards to a world corrupted by sin to recognise, as a consequence, that sometimes the choice is not between good and evil but a matter of choosing the lesser of two evils
  • Promote an appreciation of the fact that there may be a number of alternative means, political legal and social, of achieving the implementation of  Biblical principles

ASSESSMENT

UNITS 1 & 2

Assessment tasks are selected from:

  • Structured assignment
  • Essay
  • Mock court or role-play
  • Folio and report
  • Case study
  • Test
  • Report (written, visual, oral or multimedia)

UNIT 3

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks Allocated*

Outcome 1

Explain the rights of the accused and of victims in the criminal justice system, discuss the means used to determine criminal cases and evaluate the ability of the criminal justice system to achieve the principles of justice.

The student’s performance on each outcome will be assessed using one or more of the following:

  • A case study
  • Structured questions
  • A test
  • An essay
  • A report in written format
  • A report in multimedia format
  • A folio of exercises

50

Outcome 2

Analyse the factors to consider when initiating a civil claim, discuss the institutions and methods used to resolve civil disputes and evaluate the ability of the civil justice system to achieve the principles of justice

50

TOTAL MARKS

100

*School-assessed coursework for Unit 3 contributes 25% to the study score

 

UNIT 4

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks Allocated*

Outcome 1

Discuss the significance of High Court cases involving the interpretation of the Australian Constitution and evaluate the ways in which the Australian Constitution acts as a check on parliament in law-making

The student’s performance on each outcome will be assessed using one or more of the following:

  • A case study
  • Structured questions
  • A test
  • An essay
  • A report in written format
  • A report in multimedia format
  • A folio of exercises

40

Outcome 2

Discuss the factors that affect the ability of parliament and courts to make law, evaluate the ability of these law-makers to respond to the need for law reform, and analyse how individuals, the media and law reform bodies can influence a change in the law

60

TOTAL MARKS

100

*School-assessed coursework for Unit 4 contributes 25% to the study score

“The Lord said, “If as one people speaking the same language they have begun to do this, then nothing they plan to do will be impossible for them. Come, let us go down and confuse their language so they will not understand each other.” That is why it was called Babel – because there the Lord confused the language of the whole world. From there the Lord scattered them over the face of the whole earth.” Genesis 11:6-7, 9


 

VCE HUMANITIES: Texts and Traditions Elective Subject [WS Year 10]

“A thorough knowledge of the Bible is worth more than a college education.” Theodore Roosevelt

Overview

This subject provides students with an outstanding opportunity to study the Bible as a part of their VCE. This subject is offered at Waverley Christian College with the purpose of empowering students to have a mature and confident grasp of the Bible and the study skills to be able to interpret and apply its message to life today. In Units 1 & 2 students learn about the importance of the Bible’s story for the Christian faith, its authority and the way the Bible relates to contemporary issues in our society. In Units 3 & 4 students study the Gospel of Luke for the entire year. This includes a strong focus on the background of the Gospel which many students find invaluable for their reading of the New Testament.

CONTENT

UNIT 1:  TEXTS AND TRADITIONS

AREAS OF STUDY

Learning To Read The Bible As It Was Intended

This area of study includes:

  • The need to interpret
  • The different types of literature found in the Bible
  • Revisiting famous narratives in the Bible’s storyline
  • Set apart to be a prophet - Jeremiah and the exile of Judah

The Story That Explains All Others. Mastering The Epic Story Of The Bible

This area of study includes:

  • 66 Books + approximately 1500 years + approximately 40 authors = one story
  • Contemporary methods of opening up the Bible’s story
  • The Law and the Gospel - Reconciling two pillars of the Biblical story

Later Uses And Interpretations Of The Bible

This area of study includes:

  • Artistic interpretations of the Exodus and Passover
  • Artistic interpretations of the Gospels
  • Artwork, architecture and the Bible

UNIT 2:  TEXTS IN SOCIETY

AREAS OF STUDY

How Trustworthy Is The Text Of The Bible Today?

This area of study includes:

  • How the Bible was put together and handed down to us
  • Evidence for the accuracy and reliability of the Bible
  • Books that didn’t make it

What Authority Does The Bible Have?

This area of study includes:

  • The God who speaks - Investigating the Doctrine of Revelation
  • The God who can be trusted - Investigating the Doctrine of Inspiration
  • The Reformation and issues of translation

The Other Books. Comparing The Bible To Texts From World Religions

This area of study includes:

  • Differences and similarities between the Bible and the Koran
  • Cults and extreme interpretations of the Bible’s story
  • Mormonism and the Book of Mormon

ASSESSMENT

UNITS 1 & 2

Assessment tasks are selected from:

  • Folio of work
  • Bible overview
  • Film analysis
  • Interview with Senior Pastor
  • Essay
  • Comparative investigation
  • End of semester Examination

UNIT 3: TEXTS AND EARLY TRADITION

AREAS OF STUDY

The Background of Luke’s Gospel

This area of study includes:

  • Students undertaking a social and historical study of the background to Jesus’ life in the first century
  • Students examining texts relating to the origin and early development of Christianity, focusing on events, people and places important to its development

The Historical and Literary Background to Luke’s Gospel

This area of study includes:

  • Students examining issues that relate to the writing of Luke’s Gospel for example, purpose, authorship and intended audience
  • Students developing a knowledge of Luke in terms of its literary structure and major themes.  These major themes will come from the passages for special study but be applicable to the entire set text

Interpreting Luke’s Gospel (Part 1)

This area of study includes:

  • Students applying exegetical methods to develop an interpretation of some of the passages for special study in Luke’s Gospel, and discussing the nature of, and the challenges to, exegetical method

Unit 4:  TEXTS AND THEIR TEACHING

AREAS OF STUDY

Interpreting Luke’s Gospel (Part 2)

This area of study includes:

  • Students continuing the development of the knowledge and skills required for writing competent exegeses of passages from the set texts
  • Students will engage in an exegetical study of texts in light of the above considerations

The Religious Ideas, Beliefs and Social Themes of Luke’s Gospel

This area of study includes:

  • Students investigating a significant religious idea, belief or social theme arising out of the passages for special study in Luke this idea, belief or theme is then investigated over the entire set text

BIBLICAL PERPECTIVES

“All Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness, so that all God's people may be thoroughly equipped for every good work.” - 2 Timothy 3:16-17 (TNIV).

This subject will seek to further train students in their ability to read and apply the scriptures to their life and the world that they live in.

ASSESSMENT

UNIT 1

Assessment tasks for this unit are selected from:

  • Summaries
  • Textual Commentaries
  • Essays
  • Oral Presentations where appropriate, supported by multimedia presentations
  • Short Reports
  • Exegetical Exercises
  • Comparative Tables
  • Short-Answer Questions

UNIT 2

Assessment tasks for this unit are selected from:

  • Summaries
  • Textual commentaries
  • Essays
  • Oral presentations where appropriate, supported by multimedia presentations
  • Short reports
  • Comparative tables
  • Short-answer questions

UNIT 3

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks Allocated*

Outcome 1

Identify and explain social and cultural contexts that influenced early development of the religious tradition.

For each outcome, one or more of the following:

  • Textual commentary
  • Essay
  • Oral presentation, supported, where appropriate, by multimedia presentation
  • Exegetical task
  • Short report
  • Test
  • Short-answer questions

30

Outcome 2

Discuss major themes of the set text, and analyse its literary structure and issues related to the writing of the set text.

30

Outcome 3

Apply exegetical methods to develop an interpretation of some of the passages for special study, and discuss the nature of, and challenges to, exegetical method.

40

TOTAL MARKS

100

*School-assessed coursework for Unit 3 contributes 25% to the study score

 

UNIT 4

Outcomes

Assessment Tasks

Marks Allocated*

Outcome 1

Apply exegetical methods to develop an interpretation of all the passages for special study.

For each outcome, one or more of the following:

  • Textual commentary
  • Essay
  • Oral presentation, supported, where appropriate, by multimedia presentation
  • Exegetical task
  • Short report
  • Test
  • Short-answer questions

50

Outcome 2

Discuss a significant religious idea, belief or social theme in the set text, and analyse and evaluate how related passages from the set text have been interpreted within the tradition at a later stage in the light of the particular idea, belief or theme.

50

TOTAL MARKS

100

*School-assessed coursework for Unit 3 contributes 25% to the study score

"Listen to this, Job; stop and consider God's wonders. Job 37:14


 

VCE PERFORMING ARTS: Music Performance Elective Subject [WS Year 10]

“The aim and final reason of all music should be nothing else but the glory of God and the refreshment of the spirit.” Johann Sebastian Bach

Overview

This unit is designed for students with a love for performing all genres of music. This subject will focus on all the attributes of performance including sound and lighting. The entire class will perform in both solo and group formats culminating in the entire class forming a ‘class band’ where every student will have the opportunity to participate on their major instrument in a contemporary ensemble.  Students who select this unit must be able to sing confidently or play an instrument.  The class may also be called upon to prepare items for special occasions.   The course’s experience will culminate in the creation of a recorded CD of the top pieces performed.  Students will have opportunity to compose and orchestrate for these performances.

Aims

  • To give students a contemporary ensemble experience
  • To be able to cooperate in the creation of original and ‘lifted’ music
  • To further students’ ability to play an instrument
  • To encourage participation in musical groups
  • To foster confidence and enjoyment in performing
  • To understand how the elements of music are manipulated to create many different styles
  • To develop a leadership role in Music at the school particularly to develop a leadership role in Chapel Worship Bands that will help younger students to connect with God through the medium of music

Topics Include

  • Ensemble Performance
  • ‘Lifting pop songs’ from a recording
  • Composition
  • Music Technology
  • History of Rock music
  • Theory and analysis of Western and Folk Music
  • Aural Studies

Time Allocation

  • 5 periods per cycle, Semester based

Prerequisites

  • Must be able to sing confidently or play an instrument

Requirements

  • Levy Cost

Assessment

  • Written Assignment
  • In-Class Performances
  • Theory Packets and Texts
  • Arrangement

“Praise the Lord, Praise God in his sanctuary; praise him in his mighty heavens. Praise him for his acts of power; praise him for his surpassing greatness. Praise him with the sounding of the trumpet, praise him with the harp and lyre, praise him with tambourine and dancing, praise him with the strings and flute, praise him with the clash of cymbals, praise him with resounding cymbals. Let everything that has breath praise the Lord. Praise the Lord” Psalm 150


 

VCE SCIENCE: Psychology Elective Subject [WS Year 10]

“The world is God’s epistle to mankind – His thoughts are flashing upon us from every direction” Plato (427-347 BC)

Overview

This study enables students to:

  • Apply psychological models, theories and concepts to describe, explain and analyse observations and ideas related to human thoughts, emotions and behaviour
  • Examine the ways that a biopsychosocial approach can be applied to organise, analyse and extend knowledge in psychology
  • Understand the cooperative, cumulative, evolutionary and interdisciplinary nature of science as a human endeavour, including its possibilities, limitations and political and sociocultural influences
  • Develop a range of individual and collaborative science investigation skills through experimental and inquiry tasks in the field and in the laboratory
  • Develop an informed perspective on contemporary science-based issues of local and global significance
  • Apply their scientific understanding to familiar and to unfamiliar situations, including personal, social, environmental and technological contexts
  • Develop attitudes that include curiosity, open-mindedness, creativity, flexibility, integrity, attention to detail and respect for evidence-based conclusions
  • Understand and apply the research, ethical and safety principles that govern the study and practice of the discipline in the collection, analysis, critical evaluation and reporting of data
  • Communicate clearly and accurately an understanding of the discipline using appropriate terminology, conventions and formats

CONTENT

UNIT 1: HOW ARE BEHAVIOUR AND MENTAL PROCESSES SHAPED?

AREAS OF STUDY

How Does The Brain Function?

Advances in brain research methods have led to new ways of understanding the relationship between the mind, brain and behaviour. In this area of study students examine how our understanding of brain structure and function has changed over time and how the brain enables us to interact with the external world around us. They analyse the roles of specific areas of the brain and the interactions between different areas of the brain that enable complex cognitive tasks to be performed. Students explore how brain plasticity and brain damage can affect a person’s functioning.

What Influences Psychological Development?

The psychological development of an individual involves complex interactions between biological, psychological and social factors. In this area of study students explore how these factors influence different aspects of a person’s psychological development. They consider the interactive nature of hereditary and environmental factors and investigate specific factors that may lead to development of typical or atypical psychological development in individuals, including a person’s emotional, cognitive and social development and the development of psychological disorders.

Student-Directed Research Investigation

In this area of study students apply and extend their knowledge and skills developed in Areas of Study 1 and/or 2 to investigate a question related to brain function and/or psychological development. Students analyse the scientific evidence that underpins the research in response to a question of interest. They then communicate the findings of their research investigation and explain the psychological concepts, outline contemporary research and present conclusions based on the evidence.

UNIT 2: HOW DO EXTERNAL FACTORS INFLUENCE BEHAVIOUR AND MENTAL PROCESSES?

AREAS OF STUDY

What Influences A Person’s Perception Of The World?

Human perception of internal and external stimuli is influenced by a variety of biological, psychological and social factors. In this area of study students explore two aspects of human perception – vision and taste – and analyse the relationship between sensation and perception of stimuli. They consider how biological, psychological and social factors can influence a person’s perception of visual and taste stimuli, and explore circumstances where perceptual distortions of vision and taste may occur.

How Are People Influenced To Behave In Particular Ways?

A person’s social cognition and behaviour influence the way they view themselves and the way they relate to others. In this area of study students explore the interplay of biological, psychological and social factors that shape the behaviour of individuals and groups. They consider how these factors can be used to explain the cause and dynamics of particular individual and group behaviours, including attitude formation, prejudice, discrimination, helping behaviour and bullying. Students examine the findings of classical and contemporary research as a way of theorising and explaining individual and group behaviour.

Student-Directed Practical Investigation

In this area of study students design and conduct a practical investigation related to external influences on behaviour. The investigation requires the student to develop a question, plan a course of action to answer the question, undertake an investigation to collect the appropriate primary qualitative and/or quantitative data, organise and interpret the data and reach a conclusion in response to the question. The investigation relates to knowledge and skills developed in Areas of Study 1 and/or 2 and is undertaken by the student using either quantitative or qualitative methods, including experiments, surveys, questionnaires, observational studies and/or rating scales.

UNIT 3: HOW DOES EXPERIENCE AFFECT BEHAVIOUR AND MENTAL PROCESSES?

AREAS OF STUDY

How Does The Nervous System Enable Psychological Functioning?

In this area of study, students explore the role of different branches of the nervous system in enabling a person to integrate, coordinate and respond to internal and external sensory stimuli. They explore the specialised structures and functioning of neurons that allow the nervous system to transmit neural information. Students evaluate how biological, psychological and social factors can influence a person’s nervous system functioning. In particular, they consider the ways in which stress can affect the mind and body, the role that the nervous system plays in these processes and how stress can be managed.

How Do People Learn And Remember?

Memory and learning are core components of human identity: they connect past experiences to the present and shape futures by enabling adaption to daily changes in the environment. In this area of study students study the neural basis of memory and learning and examine factors that influence the learning of new behaviours and the storage and retention of information in memory. They consider the influence of biological, psychological and social factors on the fallibility of memory.

UNIT 4: HOW IS WELLBEING DEVELOPED AND MAINTAINED?

AREAS OF STUDY

How Do Levels Of Consciousness Affect Mental Processes And Behaviour?

Differences in levels of awareness of sensations, thoughts and surroundings influence individuals’ interactions with their environment and with other people. In this area of study students focus on states of consciousness and the relationship between consciousness and thoughts, feelings and behaviours. They explore the different ways in which consciousness can be studied from physiological and psychological perspectives and how states of consciousness can be altered. Students consider the nature and importance of sleep and apply biological, psychological and social factors to analyse the effects of sleep disturbances on psychological functioning, including mood, cognition and behaviour.

What Influences Mental Wellbeing?

In this area of study, students examine what it means to be mentally healthy. They explore the concept of a mental health continuum and factors that explain how location on the continuum for an individual may vary over time. Students apply a biopsychosocial approach to analyse mental health and mental disorder, and evaluate the roles of predisposing, precipitating, perpetuating and protective factors in contributing to a person’s mental state. Specific phobia is used to illustrate how a biopsychosocial approach can be used to explain how biological, psychological and social factors are involved in the development and management of a mental disorder. Students explore the concepts of resilience and coping and investigate the psychological basis of strategies that contribute to mental wellbeing.

Practical Investigation

The investigation requires the student to identify a purpose, develop a question, formulate a research hypothesis including operationalised variables and plan a course of action to answer the question and that takes into account safety and ethical guidelines. Students then undertake an experiment that involves the collection of primary qualitative and/or quantitative data, analyse and evaluate the data, identify limitations of data and methods, link experimental results to science ideas, reach a conclusion in response to the question and suggest further investigations which may be undertaken. Results are communicated in a scientific poster format.

BIBLICAL PERSPECTIVE

  • To better understand ourselves in order to further develop our God-given potential
  • To have a better understanding of the behaviour of others in order to relate more effectively in personal and professional life
  • Through an understanding of “scientific” Psychology, to appreciate its relevance to Biblical principles

ASSESSMENT

UNIT 1

Outcome 1: Test

Outcome 2: Empirical Research Activity on Piaget’s Theory of Development

Outcome 3: Report of an investigation

UNIT 2

Outcome 1: Test and Visual perception annotated presentation

Outcome 2: Social behaviour media analysis

Outcome 3: External influences on behaviour scientific poster

UNIT 3

UNIT 4

“Do you not know that in a race all the runners run, but only one gets the prize? Run in such a way as to get the prize. Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever. Therefore I do not run like someone running aimlessly; I do not fight like a boxer beating the air. No, I strike a blow to my body and make it my slave so that after I have preached to others, I myself will not be disqualified for the prize.” 1 Corinthians 9:24-27